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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

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Child of the pure unclouded brow 

And dreaming eyes of wonder! 

Though time may be fleets and I thou 

Are half a life asunder, 

Thy loving smile will surely hail 

Thelove-'gift of a fairy-tale. 

I have not seen thy sunny facey 
Nor heard thy silver laughter; 
No thought of me shall find a place 

In thy young lifes hereafter- 

Enough that now thou wilt not fail 

To listen to my fairy-tale. 

A tale begun in other days. 
When summer suns were glowing- 
A simple chime y that served to time 
The rhythm of our rowing- 
Whose echoes live in memory yety 
ufh envious years would say forget. ' 




Come, hearken theriy ere voice of dread, 
With bitter tidings laden, 
Shall summon to unwelcome bed 

A melancholy maidenl 

We are but older children, dear. 

Who fret to find our bedtime near. 

Without, the frost, the blinding snow, 

The storm-wind's moody madness- 

Within, the firelight's ruddy glow, 

A childhood's nest of gladness. 

The magic words shall hold thee fast: 

Thou shalt not heed the raving blast. 

And though the shadow of a sigh 
May tremble through the story. 
For 'happy summer days gone by. 
And vanished summer glory- 
It shall not touch with breath of bale 
The pleasance of our fairy -tale. 

-From Through the Looking Glass, Louis Carroll 





Dear Members of the Class of 1999: 



When you came to Boston College in August, 1995, each of you brought 
hopes and expectations that the next four years would be among the most 
enriching of your lives. You were confident that at the Heights you would begin 
to make your mark on the world, to make a difference. 

Today, your wealth of memories, personal achievements, and strong 
friendships confirms the expectations you held for yourself and Boston College. 
But as happy as we all are to reflect upon the past four years, these satisfactions 
are tempered by the knowledge of just how challenging it is to work for justice, 
peace, and a better world. 

You have been blessed with many talents and gifts. Our society needs 
men and women like you - generous, faithful, determined, and caring. 

I wish you the best in the years ahead. May you always draw sustenance 
from Boston College. And may God be with you now and in the future. 

Sincerely, 



ivdi^ ^ ^.M 



William P. Leahy, S.J. 
President , — 



RWimmP, Leahy; President 





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Outside /fe Gates 



Editors - Samantha Steel &C Lauren Prinfrle 



T 

JL he 



headlines of 



the "outside" world, beyond the 
gates of Boston College, seem 
distant and removed during 
your four years on the Heights. 
It is the events on and around 
campus which play important 
roles in your lives. Once you 
graduate and walk out the gates, 
the daily national and 
international events will become 
experiences which influence you 
and your decisions. 



Current Events 



President William Jefferson 
Clinton became the second 
president in U.S. history to be 
impeached. The U.S. House of 
Representatives approved two 
articles of impeachment— accusing 
President ofClinton of perjury and 
obstruction of justice. Each steamed 
from his sworn testimony in the 
Paula Jones sexual harassment case 
concerning his relationship with 
former White House intern Monica 
Lewinsky. 




In December the United States and 
Britain fired hundreds of missiles 
at Iraq after the country reneged on 
its promises of full cooperation with 
U.N. weapons inspectors. The 
"substantial" military strike was in 
an effort to destroy the country's 
weaponry. 




28 Current Events 




On Friday, August 7, 1998, more 
rhan 250 people were killed and 
more than 5,500 were wounded in 
twin bombings at United States 
embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. 
Secretary of State Madeline 
Albright called for punishment of 
the terrorists responsible. 




Albanian children continue to grow 
up surrounded by war, as thousands 
of homes were destroyed during 
offensives by Serb forces attempting 
to crush the Kosovo Liberation 
Army. Strikes in October prompted 
NATO to threaten airstrikes against 
Serb military positions in Kosovo. 



Current Events 29 



President William Jefferson 
Clinton became the second 
president in U.S. history to be 
impeached. The U.S. House of 
Representatives approved two 
articles of impeachment— accusing 
President ofClintonofperjury and 
obstruction of justice. Each steamed 
from his sworn testimony in the 
Paula Jones sexual harassment case 
concerning his relationship with 
former White House intern Monica 
Lewinsky. 




In December the United States and 
Britain fired hundreds of missiles 
at Iraq after the country reneged on 
its promises of full cooperation with 
U.N. weapons inspectors. The 
"substantial" military strike was in 
an effort to destroy the country's 
weaponry. 




28 Current Events 




On Friday, August 7, 1998, more 
than 250 people were killed and 
more than 5,500 were wounded in 
twin bombings at United States 
embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. 
Secretary of State Madeline 
Albright called for punishment of 
the terrorists responsible. 




Albanian children continue to grow 
up surrounded by war, as thousands 
of homes were destroyed during 
offensives by Serb forces attempting 
to crush the Kosovo Liberation 
Aimy. Strikes in October prompted 
NATO to threaten airstrikes against 
Serb military positions in Kosovo. 



Current Events 29 



Hurricane George and Hurricane 
Mitch brought devastation and 
damage to the Southern United 
States and most of Central America 
and the Caribbean. Hundreds were 
killed and injured as the fierce 
storms struck the coasts and islands 
in their path. 




1998 was a roller-coaster ride for 
Wall Street as the Asian market 
crisis moved across Europe to New 
York. The Dow plunged 554 points 
in October and investors managed 
to storm the market back up again. 
The plunge caused many to evaluate 
the b'.inpy ride. 




30 Current Events 




Exon Corp. and Mobil Corp. 
announced that the two major oil 
companies have agreed to a record 
$77.2 billion merger. The corporate 
marriage reunites two of the biggest 
pieces of John D. Rockerfeller's 
Standard Oil empire creating the 
world's largest company. 




Swissair Flight 1 1 1, en route from 
New York to Geneva, crashed into 
the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of 
Nova Scotia on September 2, 1998. 
All 229 people aboard were killed. 



Current Events 3 1 



St. Louis Cardinal Mark McGuire 
and Chicago Cub Sammy Sosa 
brought baseball back to its glory as 
the national pastime as the two 
went head-to-head to capture the 
new single-season homerun record. 
McGuire succeeded ending the 
season with 62 homeruns while 
Sosa had 58 home runs on the 
season. 




The space shuttle Discovery lifted 
offfrom Kennedy Space Station on 
October 29, 1998. The shuttle 
carried a crew of 7 including Sen. 
John Glenn, who rocketed back 
into orbit on a mission of science 
and sentiment, returning as the 
world's oldest astronaut to the high 
frontier he pioneered for America 
36 years ago. 




32 Current Events 




On January 13, 1999 at the United 
Center in Chicago, Michael Jordan 
announced his retirement from the 
Chicago Bulls and the NBA. Jordan 
has been regarded as the greatest 
player and the greatest draw in 
NBA history. 




World Cup Soccer took the world 
by storm. The French national team 
captured the World Cup 98 by 
beating Brazil in the final match 3- 
0. Thousands of French fans 
celebrated their first World Cup 
Championship, overtaking the city 
streets of Paris. 



Current Events 33 








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TheFinePrint 



Editor - Lauren Prinp;le 



g 



E 



oston College is 
a university which strives for 
academic excellence. Year after 
year, our graduates rank among 
the best in the country and are 
recruited by top companies both 
nationally and internationally. 
Students achieve success 
through hard vv'ork and 
dedication. The curriculum 
offered at BC, develops a well- 
rounded individual with a 
strong liberal arts background. 



ACADEJVIICS 




When a family member or a friend from home asks us how school is going, what is the first 
thing we think of" The party we went to Friday night, the play we saw over the weekend, the 
day we spent in the city, the friendships we've made. . . Classes don't even enter our minds! It 
is all too easy for us to take for granted the amazing professors that are a part of our lives each 
and every day, yet they, too, are a large part of our college experience. Faculty, perhaps even more 
so than our friends, can have a strong influence on our development. They not only teach us and 
challenge us, but they help us grow into a person who will be ready to take on life after Boston 
College. 

The people presented on the following pages were nominated by seniors for the outstanding 
work they have done for the student body. Many of the professors were nominated for their 
teaching style or class content, while others were singled out for the care and concern they show 
students both in and out of the classroom. They are united by their desire to help students reach 
their potential and explore every possible opportunity. 

This is only the second year this section has been included in the yearbook. Seniors responded 
enthusiastically to our call for nominations of outstanding faculty members. For the first time, 
a nonteaching faculty member, Mary Hehir of the University Chaplaincy, has been included in 
the section, making it all too obvious that professors are not the only "teachers" on campus. 
Thank you to the students whose nominations are included on the following pages, and to the 
faculty members for their participation in obtaining their photo. 



Judith SkinduL'l^otksckLtd 



Judy Kothschild is, in my opinion, the greatest employee Boston College will ever have to represent 
this refined institution. I firmly believe that a college professor should go beyond the realms of a 
normal teacher-student relationship, and Judy fiilfilled all my expectations of not only what a good 
teacher should be, but of a truly amazing person. 

Judy was my psychiatric clinical instructor, but her actions extended beyond the classroom. 
Outside of clinical, Judy's door was always open to us, eager to help us in our studies or to just listen 
when we needed to talk. She knew all of our troubles and joys, and she would give advice or praise, 
but yet she would never involve herself beyond that fine line between "professional" and "unprofes- 
sional." 

Judy is intelligent and experienced, and is knowledgeable not only in psych but in all areas of life 
and the world itself She has been interviewed on "Good Morning America" and New England Cable 
News recently, as well as on other networks in the past. She cares about her students, and wants them 
to excel. She is passionate in her beliefs in nursing and her excitement about the nursing field is 
infectious. 

Before I met Judy, I had lost my faith and joy in nursing, and was beginning to doubt myself in 
my abilities as a nurse. Judy instilled confidence and independence in me once again, and now I love 
my career choice. 

Judy Rothschild is a hero, and should be recognized in the BC community so others may know 
how fortunate we all are to have her with us. 



thanks to Kate '^enoit 




36 Faculty Perspectives 



Qokn ^Leincif jZarixf ^atpetn Aiancif toilets 



Any suidciu who lias liccn ciuglit by politi- 
t.il science professor John Ticrncy has been 
quite tortunate. He leaves a lasting impression 
on his students and his classes are remembered 
long after they are completed. I have met quite 
a few Boston College alumni who graduated 
with degrees in political science and all are 
adamant that Professor Ticrney was their favor- 
ite professor at BC. Former students say they 
still remember things that they learned in his 
I class and often reread books they used in his 
class. 

Professor Tierney's classes are extremely 
popular as can be seen by the frequent demand 
for overrides. He is passionate about the mate- 
rial he teaches and this passion extends to his 
students. His wit is matched only by his great 
sense of humor. His teaching style allows 
material that sometimes appears dry to seem 
interesting instead. 

Using personal anecdotes and widespread 
P political experience, Professor Tierney teaches 
his class with charisma. His innovative assign- 
ments such as following the life of a specific 
congressman for the entire semester contribute 
greatly to his students' learning. He is always 
available for help outside of class and often 
assists students in obtaining political intern- 
ships or law school recommendations. 

Even after he suffered a heart attack two 
years ago, Professor Tierney still kept in touch 
with his students while at home and showed 
how much he cared for them and the Boston 
College community. 



I iiomiii.iieti prolessor I lalpcrii lor iliis sclihiu 
because I teel he was the best professor I had 
during my four years at Boston C'ollege. 

When I was registering lor my senior year 
classes, someone told me that 1 should not take 
Strategy and Policy unless I have professor Halpern 
as my teacher. It turns out that it was a great piece 
of advice. 

Professor Halpern teaches because he truly 
loves teaching. He is not a professor that teaches 
for the money or because that is what he choose his 
career field to be a long time ago. In fact, he was 
the CEO of a major apparel company and prob- 
ably has more than enough money to settle down 
and retire. However, he loves challenging his 
students and makes them want to be in his class- 
room as much as he wants to be there. 

It was great learning from a man each one of us 




thanks to ^ara KiLssik 



is aspiring to be like. He brought his real world 
experiences into the classroom and taught cases 
that he thought would keep us interested. Profes- 
sor Halpern is not a textbook teacher. Knowing 
that the majority of students retain a marginal 
amount of knowledge when using text books, he 
eliminated them from the class structure. 

Instead, he used discussions about major com- 
panies based on short Harvard Business School 
Readings. He expected each of us to read the case 
and to be prepared to discuss it. What was great 
about Professor Halpern was that he got every- 
body to do the work without threatening the 
students. Very rarely would a student be unpre- 
pared to discuss the case in class. He knew 
everybody's name and made it a point to get the 
shy people involved. He often added some twist 
to class like bringing in props that not only baffled 
the students, but got discussions rolling. 



I^hanks to j2-en Scatoia 




I had Professor Zollers for my Early Child- 
hood Education Senior Seminar. She was an 
amazing professor because she was able to create 
a relationship between herself and her students 
that was more than an academic relationship. 
She was available for us to come and talk to her 
about anything and was very encouraging when 
we had problems with our student teaching. It 
was also nice having a professor relate to what 
we were going through while we were student 
teaching. The whole class would laugh together 
or mourn together when we shared stories about 
our student teaching experiences. When it 
came to assignments, she let us rewrite our 
papers because she would rather have us under- 
stand the assignment than receive a grade with- 
out knowing what we did wrong. 

I am so happy she has received this award 
because she deserves it. She is probably one of 
the best professors I have had at Boston College 
and 1 think she will be one of the professors I will 
always remember because she is a great example 
that all teachers should follow. 



^lianks to Xleslle ^sai 



Faculty Perspectives 37 



^dwatd /Kuttl^an y^ticia /Kunndt "^atket <Hi^c^ 



I knew from the first day of Sign Language 
class that Professor MulUgan was a great profes- 
sor. He started our first class with story time 
and made sign language fun for us to learn. He 
used a variety of teaching methods, including 
technology, visual aids, films, collaborative 
projects, deaf simulations and songs. 

Learning a song in sign language seemed 
difficult at first, but Professor Mulligan took 
time on a Saturday morning to help each of us 
with our projects. Professor Mulligan was al- 
ways available to answer a question and took 
class time to review when one of us didn't 
understand something. Professor Mulligan is 
unique in that his class is always different. He 
portrays his love of teaching and truly makes his 
students want to learn. 

His enthusiasm is contagious. I nominated 
Professor Mulligan for this award because he is 
by far one of the most captivating and interest- 
ing teachers I have had at Boston College. He 
truly cares about the student in his classes. 
From him, I not only learned sign language but 
I learned to appreciate the culture of deaf people. 



Professor Alicia Munnell is an amazing at- 
tribute to the Boston College community. Not 
only does she entertain her students with her 
tales from Washington during her time as a 
member of the President's Council of Eco- 
nomic Advisors, she also spends much of her 
time answering questions from "Newsweek", 
"Business Week", and the Wall Street Journal . 

I have had the opportunity to work with 
Professor Munnell as a research assistant and 
have taken her course on monetary and fiscal 
policy — a course that is quickly becoming very 
difficult to get into because of word of mouth. 
As her research assistant, I helped write the 
grant proposal for a Retirement Research Cen- 
ter that brought $5.25 million to BC. Working 
in her office, I often spoke with Professor 




'thanks to ''Jen yAiden 



Munnell's "friends" on the phone — many of 
the authored of my readings in my economics 
courses. I was always treated as a coworker 
rather than a subordinate, often being given 
more credit for our projects than was deserved. 
Professor Munnell acts as a tremendous role 
model to me, as the focus of her career is often 
to fight for policies that help to fight poverty 
and inequality in our country. Time and again, 
she puts her current project on hold to compose 
a testimony for the Senate to aid their decision- 
making. Yet she is amazingly able to schedule 
her trips to Washington around her class, as it is 
her top priority. And in this whirlwind of 
activity, she can always find time to take a call 
from a family member. To me, she is a balanced 
woman who is making a tremendous difference 
in the world. 



thanks to (3-indif ^ei7i^ 



I have had the pleasure of taking two classes with Fr, 
Michael J. Himes, Christian Theology and Beliefs in ;; 
Modernity. I have participated in a countless number 
of his masses Wednesdays at noon in the St. Mary's ji 
chapel, and I have been so lucky as to sit down at a table ^ 
with him and enjoy a meal and an unforgettable conver- 
sation. 

Fr. Himes has not always taught at BC. Before he 
came to Chestnut Hill he taught at another private 
Catholic University in a little town called South Bend 
in Indiana. Fr. Himes left Notre Dame and came to B.C. 
for many reasons including the school's history, the 
students, the Jesuit foundation and its location, which 
allowed him to be close to his mother. Notre Dame did 
not easily hand him over, however. When it came down 
to his departure from the school, its president said to Fr. 
Himes, "Notre Dame is not prepared to lose one of its 
best professors, humanitarians and friends. We are 
prepared to offer you anything for you to remain at 
Notre Dame. What can we do?" Fr. Himes smiled and 
said in his educated and slightly British voice, "My good 
man, move Notre Dame to Chestnut Hill, MA and I 
will remain at your University." To make a long story 
short, Notre Dame is still in South Bend and Fr. Himes 
is in Chestnut Hill where he is admired, loved and in 
demand. 

Fr. Himes brings something to his lectures, homilies 
and speeches that is unique and memorable. I can 
honestly say that he has been the most powerfiil, influ- 
ential and breathtaking professor I have had at BC. His 
lectures are exhilarating and his homilies, earth shatter- 
ing. He speaks with enthusiasm and energy. His every 
word is spoken as if it were more important than the 
last. He begins his stories with gripping introductions 
and builds them to a crescendo only to conclude with a 
meaningful and powerful message. 

Fr. Himes is the epitome of the Jesuit motto, "Men 
and women for others." There are no words to give him 
credit for the immense morass of knowledge that fill; 
his head. He uses that knowledge to bring to the 
student an opportunity to grow as a person, a studeni 
and an instrument of God. Fr. Himes is a great man 
a valuable mentor and a true sign of God's love. 



thanks to ^at 



38 Faculty Perspectives 



'^Axf Kin^ 



I have had Dr. Kuig lor three courses at BC '., 
and of all the teachers I've been taught by over 
the past four years, he has made the largest 
impression on me by far. Unlike many profes- 
sors, Dr. King has a very unique teaching style. 
He knows the material inside and out, and gets 
students excited about attending class. When 1 
took his class last semester, I truly looked tor- 
ward to attending each class. 

Looking back, the material he has taught mc 
is the most clear of all the knowledge I've gained 
at BC. The material has been the most appli- 
cable to my life. I feel spoiled to have had him 
as my professor for three courses! He brought 
humor, knowledge, and talent to the classroom, 
challenging his students daily. Countless times 
I remember being awestruck by his intelligence. 

Unfortunately, this is his last semester teach- 
ing at BC, but he will be long remembered for 
his influence on the lives of myself and my 
fellow students. For these reasons and others I 
didn't mention, Dr. King has left a lasting 
impression on me. Thanks Dr. King!! 



(Zaiot ^etUlo Kevin Qoknson 




Willi. nil A. Ward once said, "I he iiKilKJiie 
fe.icher lelLs; the great teacher inspires." Tliis 
hill, I was one of the nineteen lucky seniors w Im 
speni iheir Wednesday afternoons in the Wniie 
lounge with a great teacher. Professor C^.irol 
Petillo was not only inspirational, but her 
Capstone entitled "Lessons from a War Zone " 
left a profound impact on her students. 

Professor Petillo has been in the history 
department at Boston College since the early 
1980s. Her classes include " Lessons from a "War 
Zone," "The War in Vietnam," "Topics in 20th 
Century Foreign Policy: Vietnam," and "The 
Study and Writing of History: Military Biogra- 
phy." Her teaching style is unlike any I have 
experienced. Our Capstone was run entirely by 
the students— we led discussions while she steered 
us in the right direction. This teaching method 




'thanks to Katie /Kinakan 



allowed us to think for ourselves and demon- 
strated to us her faith in our ability and intelli- 
gence. She is encouraging and pushes her 
students to succeed. 

In addition to being an excellent teacher, 
Professor Petillo is willing to spend time with 
her students and makes herself readily available. 
Her interest in her students is obvious, as is her 
commitment to the concept that teaching goes 
beyond the classroom. Professor Carol Petillo is 
truly inspirational. As an aspiring professor, 
Professor Petillo is ever}thing I hope to be. If 
someday I am as highly regarded as is Professor 
Petillo, I will consider myself a complete suc- 
cess. 



thanks to y4dtienne '^LLUn^kam 




Kevin Harrison is one of the newer profes- 
sors in the Geology and Geophysics Depart- 
ment, arriving at Boston College in 1997. He 
graduated from Brown University in 1986 with 
honors in chemistry and a second concentra- 
tion in English and American Literature. He 
then moved to Scripps Institution of Oceanog- 
raphy at UCSD and got his Masters of Science 
in marine chemstry. After that he moved on to 
Columbia University where he got his Ph.D. 
and was a Geological Sciences Faculty Fellow 
there. 

Professor Harrison, has done extensive re- 
search on carbon cycle and the so called 
"missing sink." Throughout his research on 
carbon dioxide fertilization experiments he has 
been able to show that soil can indeed store 
enough carbon to account for a portion of the 
missing carbon or the imbalance that exists in 
the carbon cycle. He is a global change geochem- 
ist, known for his awesome "back of the enve- 
lope calcutations" and his predictions on the 
effect that future greenhouse gas emissions will 
have in our planet. 

Professor Harrison is very easygoing, ex- 
tremely organized, and most importantly, he is 
a friend to his students and not just an advisor 
or a teacher. He carefully plans his lectures and 
enjoys teaching very much. He is always there 
to answer questions, no matter how late it is or 
how tired he is. He is an avid surfer, water polo 
player, biker, diver, and a fan of Chinese Food 
and cookies! He is a superb addition to the 
geolog)' department and an outstanding role 
model for students and professors. 



thanks to Katie <HaU 



Facult}' Perspectives 39 



/Kattkchi/KulUm /Hmi{<HekLt '^i.^a.ndL 



This is an attempt to show what Professor 
Mullane means to me, but then, how can one 
give a person the justice they deserve through 
words? It is made even more difficult when that 
person is Professor Matthew Mullane. 

I struggle with what makes Matthew Mullane 
such an outstanding professor. Sure, he knows 
the material he is teaching, and is able to project 
his points in a clear and concise manner, but this 
alone is not what makes him great. Nor is it his 
excellent cooking skills, exemplified in the tasty 
chili he often brings in. Maybe what makes 
Professor Mullane such an amazing professor is 
that when he talks to me either in or out of class, 
he always treats me as an equal. I never feel as 
if I can say something wrong to Professor 
Mullane. Everything I say is relevant and im- 
portant. He makes me feel that he is learning 
from me, just as I learn from him. Beyond this, 
Mullane truly cares for his students— not just 
those in his classroom, but anyone in the Faith, 
Peace, and Justice program, or anyone who 
might just want to talk. 

Mullane has made me passionate about so- 
cial justice. He has inspired me to learn more 
about social justice issues in Boston and the 
world beyond. As a mentor, teacher, and friend, 
I think Professor Mullane is the best teacher I 
ever had. His open and warm heart always 
welcomes me the minute I walk into his class- 
room or office. 




Mary Hehir has touched the lives of many 
BC students, although most students 
wouldn't recognize her if they passed her in 
McElroy. Mary is the woman behind the 
University Chaplaincy, keeping the budget 
straight for all chaplaincy-sponsored events, 
helping coordinate many of those events, 
supervising the Appalachia Volunteers, and 
most importantly, acting as a general guide 
and advocate for the students. 

Those students lucky enough to know 
Mary cannot help being affected by her cha- 
risma and boundless enthusiasm. The man- 
ner in which she engages people in conversa- 
tion and the genuine sense of concern she 
possesses for those around her is evident the 
minute one walks into her office. 

Mary is sincerely dedicated to the Boston 




%'hanks to /hike ^Auda 



College community and strives to empower 
University Chaplaincy to meet the many 
different needs of the student body. In 
particular, as the advisor for the Appalachia 
Volunteers, she has driven many of the 
changes in the program over the last several 
years. The unprecedented growth of the 
group and the continued success of the trips 
speaks towards Mary's exceptional capability 
and genuine concern for students. More- 
over, she never accepts credit for her accom- 
plishments, instead highlighting those who 
work with her. 

Functioning as a team, chaplaincy does 
not revolve solely around one individual. 
Mary Hehir, however, is one of the keystones 
among the group. 



^kanks to 'BM Ke 




Father Robert Farrell is a wonderful teacher, t 
His primary focus in the classroom is on the ■ 
students and teaching. While other teachers 
often get caught up in deadlines and heavy ' 
workloads, he makes a dedicated effort to not 
let this happen. He consistently interacts with | 
the students, never shows favorites, makes it a r 
point to know every student's name, and en- '] 
courages students to share their opinions in- 
stead of regurgitating his own thoughts. 

Father Farrell inspires his students, making ;j 
them love the subject matter. Every student is ',| 
a fan. He is completely fair, and more than;; 
understanding. He loves what he teaches, has a :j 
great sense of humor, and because his students 
realize this, his students are happy to do the 
work and, in doing so, learn a lot along the way. 
He is a truly inspirational teacher who, I believe, 
makes his students do their best work. 

Lastly, Father Farrell has such wonderfijl 
insight about the subject matter he teaches that 
interesting discussions evolve in the classroom. 
Not only do we learn about the themes, symbol- 
ism, and meaning of the many books we read,' 
we also learn a lot about life, and what it deals 
heroes, heroines, and other characters in the 
many books we read. It teaches us, therefore, to 
learn about ourselves. 

His selection of books are among the top. I 
have never read a book I did not like in any ol 
his three courses. And, unlike other English 
courses where I have forgotten the books w£ 
have read shortly after the semester ends, I reall) 
remember all books I have read for Fathei 
Farrell. The reason I remember so distinctly i; 
because he is such an excellent and caring teacher 



thanks to Qud\f ^T^C^onso 



40 Faculty Perspectives 



(Zkiis (Zonstas yAudtexf "^tledman ^^. /Kc(^oh)an 



I'lofcssoi" CA)iist;i.s IS known llnuugliom ilic 
Honors Program for his impeccable taste in 
clothing. You can see him ail aroiuid campus in 
his amazing ensembles, always looking dapper. 
But what many of the students who have had 
Professor Constas have found is that his teach- 
ing style far surpasses his wardrobe. 

Professor Constas entered the Boston Col- 
lege Honors Program as a teacher the same year 
that the Class of 1 999 entered as freshmen. He 
immediately won over the hearts and, more 
importantly, the minds of his first class of 
students. He is a professor who is genuinely 
interested in the opinions of his students and is 
deeply concerned with what they take away 
from his class. Professor Constas has an amaz- 
ing ability to connect with his students. It is a 
connection that is strengthened by an under- 
standing of his students' mind set, which stems 
from his own experience as an undergraduate in 
the Boston College Honors Program. Each and 
every student who has taken a course with 
Professor Constas has to admit that they have 
learned something that they will take with them 
even after graduation. 

As a teacher in the Honors Program Profes- 
sor Constas has not had the opportunity to 
reach a large number of students. However, 
those of us who have been fortunate enough to 
encounter him know that if given the chance, 
Devlin 008 would be standing room only for a 
course taught by Professor Constas. 




I'liilessoi Auiliey Iricdnuui is a hardworking 
,ind loving professor who is truly concerned 
with social justice and demands the best of her 
siudents. Dr. Friedman, an Assistant Professor 
in the School of Education, works days at local 
high schools, then arrives at BCat night to teach 
the next generation of teachers. Though she is 
obviously tired from her work, she still manages 
to bring energy and a sense of humor to class 
every night. It is through small things— like 
being excited to teach every class— that Profes- 
sor Friedman educates her students on how 
they should teach. 

I remember the first class 1 had with her, ,i 
night seminar on teaching methods. Professor 
Friedman entered the room carr)'ing reams of 
photocopies and handouts which she dropped 
on her desk with a thud. "If you don't think this 
is something that you want to do, get out," she 
told the startled class. I was frightened at first, 
but now, a year later, I'm starting to understand 
what she meant. The SOE is often unfairly 
labeled on campus as the "School of Easy." This 
is a laughable misnomer. If there is anything 
harder than teaching, it is learning how to 
become a teacher. In that first class. Professor 
Friedman was warning us the road would not be 
easy, and inviting us to rise to new challenges. 
Because of her constant hard work and her care 
for students, she has been a source of encourage- 
ment and inspiration. This past semester, when 
I handed in a late assignment that had given me 
much trouble, I told her by accepting it she was 
being more than fair. She smiled and said, "Just 
remember that when you become a teacher." 




Father McGowan is my favorite professor 
because of his ability to incorporate an aca- 
demic and social atmosphere both inside and 
outside the classroom. Given that he is a Jesuit, 
it is intriguing that he does research on the 
tobacco, alcohol, and gambling industries. 
However, he truly portrays the Jesuit ideals by 
being a teacher, advisor, and friend. In the 
classroom he demands a lot from his students, 
but he also helps them to excel outside the 
classroom. He will meet you for dinner or play 
you in a game of racquetball. No matter the 
situation. Father McGowan is always there to 
support his students. 

As a professor Father McGowan keeps a 
lively discussion in the classroom and pushes all 
his students to contribute. He constantly incor- 
porates real world current events into the dis- 
cussions, allowing the students to gain so much 
more from the class than what the book pro- 
vides. Father McGowan also includes students' 
names in the exams, which makes the exams in 
a subject like Statistics not only humorous, but 
easier to take. 

Finally, Father McGowan is someone that 
can be trusted for advice or to listen to his 
students. There are very few teachers who truly 
take the time to listen to and meet with their 
students outside the classroom, but Father 
McGowan has taken this next step and is a role 
model for many of them. 



thanks to Qenna ^Ine. 



^kanks to /Katt KeUi( 



^kanks to Scott C,l 



Faculty Perspectives 41 



v^^ri^v^^ v-x 





^mmi^^ 




vvi* 



To the Class of 1999: 



S^.i 




This has been a splendid class, that began its career at 
Boston College four years ago full of promise — a promise 
which has been amply fulfilled. Your academic 
accomplishments have been many: it has been a joy for me to 
honor many of you on the Dean's list and at the Dean' 
Scholars' Dinner, and many of you have been celebrated this 
year as Scholars of the College. Your commitment to the 
service of others, too, in the spirit of the Jesuit tradition, has 
been generous-hearted. 

You have seen many changes during your four years: 
external changes in the campus, the inauguration of a new 
President, and new academic offerings like our exciting and 
innovative Environmental Studies Program. But, the even 
more important changes have been the changes in yourselves: 
intellectual growth, new relationships, the development of 
your own gifts, perhaps a deepened awareness of your 
relationship with God. 

But with all the changes, some things have remained the 
same. There is the same sense of intellectual challenge and 
excitement, the same warm sense of community for which 
Boston College is celebrated, the same commitment to the 
ideals of service to others. 

Boston College will continue to change — as any institution 
must — but in its essentials it will always remain the same. 
When you return to visit, as I hope you will do often, you will 
see changes, but we trust it will always be what it had been for 
you — a communit}' founded on faith in God, on loving 
concern for one another, and on the sense of our larger 
responsibility to the world around us. 

As alumni and alumnae of Boston College, you will carp- 
the light of faith and love where you go, and we knov- r ' i : 
world will be a better, more just, and more cari" 
beCciuseofvvhatyoubringtoit — in your work, in yc 
lines, in vour communit}'. The Lord bring you ;^ii ; 
loved ones peace and joy for all the years to come! 

J. Robert Barth, S] 




Arts & Sciences 




Arts &i Sciences 



Diverse andVaried 



by Samantha Steel 

1 lie (College of Arts and Sciences, A8iS, is (he largest of the 
undergraduate schools with approximately 5,500 undergraduates 
enrolled. The school is comprised of students varied in interests. 

There are thirty-one majors offered as well as more than 
twenty interdisciplinary programs that can be chosen as a 
minor. Areas of study include Biology, English, Political Science, 
English, and Fine Arts. Pre-professional programs, Pre-Med, 
Prc-Law and Pre-Dental are included in A&S as well. Those in 
the pre-professional programs begin their freshman year to 
complete the requirements for their pre-profcssionaJ schools. 

A&S is a unique school in that it allows a student to explore 
a variety of areas of study. Undecided students often chose A&S 
in order to experience the core requirements of liberal arts classes 
until they find their special niche. Students in A&S must be 
proficient in a foreign or classical language. 

From double-majors to minors, from studying abroad to 
volunteering, A&S has something for everyone. The 
distinguished Honors Program is a challenging path for those 
student who perform above and beyond. 

The College of Arts and Sciences continues to grow each 
year.Its popularity is due in part ro its variety and the opportunities 
each of the students enrolled are given. The College of Arts and 
Sciences gives each of its graduates a solid foundation to build 
upon. 



«r 



Arts & Science 



Management 




To the Class of 1998: 

May I add my congratulations to those of many others. 
Four years seem to have flown by so quickly. I suspect that 
some of the times you once faced with great anxiety now seem 
but bumps in the road, perhaps a road too quickly traveled, 
but one that has brought many good times, roomfuls of good 
friends and, with luck and work, a few ideas that will carry 
you a long, long way. 

We all seem to believe that the Jumble, chaos, and busyness 
that surrounds our daily lives is temporary and passing, that 
a personal life was once serene, peaceful, and well-ordered. 
Our current state is temporary and we will soon, return to a 
period of calm stability. We often ignore the fact that we hold 
these beliefs over a long period of time. This spring, at the end 
of the springtime of your life, is a good time to take stock. You 
certainly want to be well provisioned for the fall and eventual 
winter ahead, even if you are about to enter a long summer 
growing season. It is a season which will always be too busy 
with too many tasks and obligations and, perhaps more 
importantly, too many opportunities. Nothing so much 
characterizes this next season of your life as a plenitude of 
opportunity with the attendant need to always be making 
selections when there is never time or energy to do it all. 

A university education, when it works well, helps one learn 
that he or she is always a student and that there are many 
lenses through which to view life, from the poetic, to the 
scientific, to the financial and economic, to the philosophical 
and theological. To lead a good and full life, you will often 
have to make use of the various ways of understanding life, 
ways that have been polished on this rocky hill by long hours 
of thought and conversation with the friends who will leave 
here with you. Perhaps it is these friends which are the 
greatest legacy you will take. 

My wish for you is that you treat each other with care and 
attention, and that you return to this old collection of stones 
that needs to be remembered by her sons and daughters. 



John Neuhausei , 




The Carroll School of Management 
welcomes all students who wish to major 
in business or want to enhance their 
schedule with CSOM electives. 

The beautiful and impressive Fulton 
atrium serves as a great study spot 
between classes or in the evening. 

The School of Management is housed in 
Fulton Hall, with its unique architecture 
and spacious rooms equiped with the 
newest technology. 



Management 




Management 

Corporate Success 



by Samantha Steel 



I'lic Wallace E. Carroll School of Management educates the 
bLisiiicss leaders of tomorrow. Over 2,000 students are enrolled 
in the school aiming towards a Bachelor of Science in 
Management degree. Offering undergraduate and graduate 
degrees ranging from Accounting to Human Resources 
Management, CSOM prepares students for the business world. 

Managemenrstudcnts must complete the required Universir,- 
Core in addition to rwelve CSOM courses, and between four to 
six courses in their chosen concentration. The eight 
concentrationsareAccounting, Computer Science, Economics, 
Finance, General Management, Human Resources 
Management, Marketing, and Operations and Strategic 
Management. 

CSOM is headed by Dean Neuhauser, Undergraduate Dean 
Keely, and Graduate Dean McClellan. Working together the 
administration strives to give management students every 
opportunity to learn decision making and team work skills in 
addition to ethics. 

The school's Honors Program tries to incorporate the BC 
community with the management world. Students in the 
program take Western Cultural Tradition during their first two 
years and are required to take Management Communications 
and Applied Statistics in their Junior and Senior years. In 
addition, they must complete a senior thesis. 

The Carroll School of Management emphasizes team work 
as well as group projects, through the courses it offers. Students 
graduate ready to move through the business world with 
confidence. 




Management ~ . 





Ml 





To the Class of 1998 



Congratulations on your graduation! The faculty, ^ 
administrators and staff in the School of Education, and I are M 
grateful to you for your many contributions to our Boston w 
College community, and we wish you success and joy in all 
your future endeavors. 

In the School of Education, we believe, as with the late 
Ernest Boyer, that "Teaching is ... a dynamic endeavor 
involving all the analogies, metaphors, and images that build 
bridges between the teacher's understanding and the student's - ^ 
learning." We believe that teaching not only transmits ip 
knowledge, but transforms and extends it through the bridges 
it builds. You have spent the last four years of your life 
preparing to be a bridge builder. You leave here with the skills 
to build a bridge between ignorance and knowledge, between 
provincialism and engagement in a diverse and complex 
world. You have learned how to be a bridge between diverse 
groups of people seeking better understanding, tolerance and 
celebration of differences. In your work as teachers and 
human service providers, you will be a bridge to the future for 
many children, youth, and families. 

You have been a member of a community of scholars and 
practitioners engaged in inquiry and practice, and we know 
that you have struggled with us in asking how knowledge can 
be applied to consequential problems. Because of your 
commitment to social justice, and to making society better for 
children, youth, and their families, you have engaged in 
service projects and volunteered your time to serve others. We 
know that you will carry the Jesuit mission of service to others 
into all your personal and professional undertakings. 

We hope that you will return often to Campion Hall to tell 
us of your new learnings, successes, and contributions. 



Mary Brabeck, Dear 




Education 

A Year of change 



by Samantha Steel 



One ol tliL- biggest changes on campus this year was the 
renaming of the School of Hducation. After a donation of over 
$10 million dollars to bring the school into the next century, 
SOE became the Lynch School of Education in recognition of 
Peter and Carolyn Lynch who so generously gave to Boston 
College. The Lynch gift will support all SOE programs, inci uding 
teacher preparations, graduate study, research, and scholarships. 

The Lynch School of Education instills in its students the 
Jesuit ideals of community and service to others. This is 
achieved through a combination of classroom instruction and 
interaction with children in all aspects of life. 

The dual-department organization offers majors in the 
following fields: Early Childhood Education, Elementary 
Education, Secondary School Education, Moderate Special 
Needs Education, and Human Development. Each of the 
majors must be combined with another major or an 
interdisciplinary minor. In addition to the undergraduate 
program, the school includes a graduate program. 

Senior year is extremely challenging yet valuable when each 
student takes part in full-time student teaching. Not only do 
they attend classes, school work and senior year, they also have 
a full-time job which requires them to wake up early and spend 
the day in the classroom. This experience is rewarding because 
it gives each the opportunity to teach on their own before 
graduation. 

The Lynch School of Education is well-known in the 
educational world. The graduate school is ranked among the 
top in the nation by U.S. News and World Report. The 
administration, faculty and students are the best the educational 
system has to offer. 




^y 



^'^•^^'•.n. 



A- 



-i^^ 



^\him r- 



5 ST. CATh€klNe\ 



- -^ I 




CUSHINC 
HALL 



To the Class of 1999: 



Congratulations to all of you on your graduation, ar 
thank you for the many contributions you have made to thl 
school during your time here. We are proud to recognize yo| 
as graduates of the Boston College School of Nursing and 
know that our pride will increase as you dedicate yourselves to 
your chosen profession. 

Although a shortage of Registered Nurses is developing, 
what is needed according to experts in the health care industry, 
is not simply more RNs, but nurse who have been prepared tl 
handle the complexities of the evolving health care 
environment. Specifically, this means nurses prepared in 
baccalaureate and higher degree nursing programs where 
critical thinking, leadership, ethical decision-making, and-- 
care across a variety of settings and encompassing clients froi 
diverse backgrounds is stressed. Your program, grounded 
the liberal arts and the Jesuit tradition of excellence in servic 
to others, has given you the preparation necessary to succeec 
in an increasingly complex environment. Those of you who 
studied in Ecuador have already demonstrated your ability to 
apply what you have learned in the most technologically 
sophisticated health care settings in the world to clients living 
in an area of acute povert)\ 

You complete your education at the end of a centur)'. Yol 
are the nurses of the new millennium. We, the faculty and 
nurses of the Twentieth Century, salute you, the nurses of the 
Twenty First Centur)^ Nursing has evolved from a hospital- 
based apprentice t}'pe program to a profession with a developing 
body of knowledge that informs its practice. The changes that 
have occurred in our centur\'^are enormous. Whatwill happen 
in your centur)^? Clearly, that depends on you. The time ia^ 
yours, the challenge before you. 

May God continue to bless you, your parents, and lovtc 
ones as you leave Boston College to commence the next phssg 
of vour life. 

/ N 



O^^t M-y^ 






Barbara Hazard Mi 





The Gushing CHnic, located in Gushing 
119, is a completly staffed medical center 
opened Monday thru Friday Sam to 5pm 
for BC students. 

As part of their hands on learning, nursing 
students practice their skills on each other. 







56 Nu 




Nursing 




by Samantha Steel 



Boston College's School of Nursing was founded in 1947 
and offers students a four year program which concludes with 
J Bachelor of Science degree and a major in Nursing. Graduates 
.ire eligible to take the state examination for licensure as a 
registered nurse. The program mi.xcs both classroom and hands 
on learning advancing "nursing as an academic and practice 
discipline through philosophical inquiry and research. " 

The curriculum is designed for students to take in a specific 
sequence and one cannot proceed without completing each 
course in order. The three components of the curriculum are the 
liberal arts and science courses shared by all the University; the 
Nursing major courses; and electives. Faculty of the School of 
Nursing guide students learning in a variety of settings, from the 
classroom, to the lab, to clinics. The graduate is prepared as a 
generalist able to care for individuals and groups, at all develop- 
mental levels and in aJl health care settings. 

Each year the class is divided into two tracks, Plan A or Plan 
B. Plan A students finish their core first. Plan B requires them 
to do their clinical first and thereby allows them to go abroad 
during their junior year. While abroad they can choose to either 
fulfill their core requirements or do nursing work. 

The Boston College nursing program is highly respected 
across the country, not only because of the nurses it turns out, 
but because its students exemplify Jesuit ideals and values. 
Graduates leave Boston College ready to enter their professional 
career with knowledge, values, and a caring attitude. 



Nursing :>' 



» m 



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f 

■ 




2\ 






*''?S3?***''*"**** 





To the Class of 1998 



Great joy and accomplishment are yours as you celebrate 
graduation. You have achieved what you dared to dream. 
The talent, commitment, and optimism you brought to 
studies will now be advanced in different directions, shared 
in new ways. 

You are on the cutting edge. A world community invites 
your vision, vitality, and vigilant empathy for others. You are 
prepared to question, to seek answers, and to respond. You 
have anchored your knowledge, convictions, and attitudes in 
a commitment to others which is the essence of moral 
engagements. Life's many changes will now always be 
examined in a defined context. 

Your imagination and initiative linkyou today with distant 
continents and disparate cultures. With few strangers in an 
interactive world, limitless opportunities will prompt you to 
connect communities and carve a fiiture of freedom and 
peace. 9 

You own the greatest human freedom: to choose your own 
attitude in any given circumstance. To secure your opinions 
under extreme conditions when there is no chance of changing 
them is the highest expression of personal autonomy. 

Respond to the compelling challenges with understanding 
and enthusiasm. Seize every opportunity with wisdom, 
optimism, and a sense of humor. For sixty-nine years 
graduates of the College of Advancing Studies have gone, 
forth into a world of upheaval and advanced the noblest 
human cause: freedom and moral concern for others. 

Prayerful best wishes for all the years ahead. 



James A. Woods, SJ, Dean 





.W'.ir*-ii 



LSfeiAMsi-']?? 



60 Advancing Studies 




Lauren Pringlc 



Advancing Studies 



Above and Beyond 



by Samantha Steel 



n 



The College oFAdvancing Studies offers a variety of learning 
and educational opportunities to adult students. The academic 
entrance requirements are flexible, although secondary school 
graduation or its equivalent is needed. The School is designed 
to give everyone an chance to grow through academics and 
works with each student to ensure that they benefit from the 
experience. 

The approximately 1 ,200 students in the College of Advanc- 
ing Studies are as unique as the school itself. They are mothers, 
fathers, high-school graduates who could not pursue a college 
education full-time, and those who want to further their degree. 
Most juggle school, work and family all at once. Due to that 
fact, each is extremely dedicated to their education. 

Students can take one class or work towards their degree. 
Classes are offered in Business, Information Processing, the 
Humanities, Political Science and the Social Sciences. The 
maximum number of classes is three per semester and credit is 
earned through individual study and attendance at class once a 
week. A baccalaureate degree may be achieved by completing a 
minimum of thirt)' courses with a grade of C- or better in five 
years. 

Classes are available during the week, at night and on 
Saturdays to accommodate everyone's schedule. Most are re- 
stricted to thirty students to ensure a stimulating classroom 
environment. The College of Advancing Studies administra- 
tion is always available to help design a schedule that fits the 
students needs to their educational goals. 



Advancing Studies 6J 



O'Neill Library 

A Modern Masterpiece 



Stretched out across O'Neill Plaza, The O'Neill Library welcomes 
students and faculty into its doors. It is known to be a bit noisy as it is one 
of the more popular social areas on campus. Whether your looking for a 
book in the stacks, researching a paper, or reading an article on reserve, 
O'Neill is the place to be. 

The library is a multimedia center. It houses over one million volumes, 
as well as microfiche, microfilm, and government documents. The media 
center, offers students the opportunity to view movies or films they 
missed in class. Study rooms on the fourth and fifth floors are available 
through a reservation system. 

Throughout the day and night, students can be found gathered 
around tables, studying in cubbies over looking the campus, and wander- 
ing through the periodicals. During exam time, space is at a premium. 
The copy machines are also always in demand, for many sources are on 
reserve. Copy cards eliminate the need for change and money can be 
added as needed. 

The information desk is located in the front of the building near the 
main doors and the staff is willing to help you with any questions you may 
have. O'Neill Library serves the needs of students and faculty at Boston 
College year-round. 

-Samantha Steel 




Flying high above O'Neill Plaza, the flag 
sways in the late afternoon as the moon 
appears in the sky. 

The modern architecture of O'Neill 
Library is in sharp contrast to the other 
academic buildings on Middle Campus. 




Ktrry Griffi» 




•*4»-,.:.- 



r^'j! 



'■:■• % . i 



J»v 






Bapstlhrary 



A True Treasure 



I Ik- silence hits you as you enter the Ijuilding, in direct contrast to the 
hustle and bustle ofO'Neill Library. Bapst combines beauty, art, history 
and academics in one building. The beauty of Gargan Hail, with the stain 
glassed windows and long dark wood tables, is not only visual but carries 
an emotional response as well. Many students chose to study in this quiet 
atmosphere surrounded by Gothic architecture. 

From top to bottom , Bapst has a wide selection of books and services 
available to students. The basement houses the vast Art Library and the 
Lonergan Center, on the fourth floor, contains the works of the Canadian 
philosopher and theologian Bernard J. F. Lonergan. The most impressive 
area of the library is accessible from the Commonwealth Avenue en- 
trance. The Burn Library houses the Rare Books collection, which offers 
priceless materials to the BC community. 

Bapst Library is a true treasure on the BC campus. Its beauty can be 
seen inside and out. The lawn surrounding the building is full of students 
St udying, relaxing and enjoying the sun on warm spring and fall days. For 
those who wish to study in silence nothing can compare to Bapst. 

-Samantha Steel 



mururk-^. 



1 11 in ^*r.*fl 



.*. W . 



A sunny day is the perfect excuse to 
study outdoors on the Bapst Lawn or just 
gather with friends to enjoy the weather. 



Bapst is a tranquil place to study 
surrounded by the beauty of Gargan Hall 
and the numerous stain-glass windows. 



Cornerstone 



Beginnings 



The 1998-1999 academic year was the first year of EC's Conerstone 
Program for first-semester freshmen. The main purpose of the course was 
to help facilitate the transition from high school to college and provide 
a mentor/advisor for each student enrolled in the class. The Cornerstone 
Program is offered in four variations. Students can choose from a one- 
credit advisement seminar that is taken as a sixth class and meets once a 
week for 75 minutes, a three credit class taken as a elective that meets three 
times a week and is called "The Courage to Know", or special sections 
of Perspectives or First- Year Writing Seminar are designated as Corner- 
stone classes. The course has received an overwhelming positive response 
from both the students and the faculty. 

-Samantha Steel 




64 Cornerstone 



Capstone 



Bidhigs 



The Capstone program was created in 1990 for second semester 
juniors and seniors who wished to reflect on their academic experiences 
and prepare for their futures. Seminars are limited to 20 students or less 
and are taught by professors of various disciplines. The Capstone 
handbook states, "As its distinctive goal, the Boston College Capstone 
Program seeks to unify the undergraduate experience, by a review of the 
moral, intellectual and spiritual ideals at the heart of the Jesuit tradition." 
There are numerous Capstone seminars available, such as "Love and 
Work," "Ethics in the Professions," and "The Literary Imagination and 
Public Life." Throughout the years, the Program continues to grow in 
popularity among the students and faculty at BC. 

-Samantha Steel 




Lauren Pnnjlc 



Capstone 65 



StudentLearningdi 
Support Center 



Boston College's computing facility is located on the second floor ot 
O'Neill Library. Over the past few years the student services have 
improved and have made for a more pleasant atmosphere within the 
center. 

The center offers 103 Macintosh, 49 Pc's, 2 color scanners, 6 e-mail 
stations, 2 music stations, and a DEC terminal. ID's are checked as you 
enter since the facility is open only to active members of the Boston 
College community. All computers contain up-to-date programming 
and gives students the opportunity to practice their technological knowl- 
edge. 

For those who need to print papers, there is a "Print Only" station 
equipped with printers installed to avoid waiting for a computer. Jobs 
requiring a large number of printed text, are rerouted to the print room 
and can be picked up at anytime. The Help Desk staff is trained in the 
basics of all major applications and can answer your computer questions. 

The line tends to be long at the end of the semester and it can take 
upwards of thirty minutes to get a computer terminal. The Student 
Learning and Support Center is striving to give each student the techno- 
logical resources they may need while at BC. 



0m 



-Samantha Steel 



Students use the computers available to 
register for classes, explore the internet, 
download their resume to the Career 
Center, and write numerous papers. 

The Student Support and Learning Center 
is a welcoming sight for those in need, 
except during finals when the wait can 
exceed thirty minutes. 




V 




66 Student Learning and Support Center 



I 



WAITING POR 
AN IBM ^ 





The course newspapers arrive at Lyons Hall as the first sign that 
registration is approaching. Students rush to check their computers to 
hnd out whether they were blessed with a great registration time or 
whether they will be stuck with the passed over classes next semester. For 
weeks all over campus, students can be seen organizing and reorganizing 
their "perfect" schedule. 



-Samantha Steel 




Waiting for a computer during 
registration period can become 
frustrating, so many students opt to 
borrow a friends computer. 

The course newspapers pile up in the 
foyer of Lyons Hall informing students 
of classes, times, and exam schedules. 



Regiscation 6/ 




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if 



0^ 

\y> SURFING 
0' RECREATIOhf 
RESERVE 



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68 Foreign Study 




Foreign Study 



LifeAbroad 



by Samantha Steel 



I'lic I'orcii^M Study Programs arc directed through theOffice 
of International Programs, which is a resource opportunity 
available to students who wish to explore all of their opportu- 
nities abroad. The Office of International Programs coordi- 
nates and administers study in over twenty-one countries. Each 
year over 500 students choose to spend either a semester or a 
year abroad in places such as Australia, China, France, Ireland, 
Japan, Russia, Spain, or South Africa . Students can cross- 
registrar at another university provided the curriculum is com- 
parable to Boston College's. 

The Foreign Studies program is aimed to give students the 
opportunity to become fluent in a foreign language and expe- 
rience a different culture. By living in another country, students 
are immersed in a new way of life and it is a semester one never 
forgets. From the Big Ben to the Great Barrier Reef from the 
Pyramids to the Great Wall of China, Boston College is making 
its mark internationally. 

Students once abroad often choose to travel throughout the 
region they are studying, making trips throughout Europe and 
Asia. The once-in-a-lifetime semester becomes a once-in-a- 
lifetime adventure. Each year more and more students partici- 
pate in the Foreign Study Program because of the opportunities 
and advantages it lends to those who take advantage of the 
program. 




Lauren I'rmgk- 



Coffee break? During exam time, stu- 
dents can be found all over campus and 
the surrounding areas trying to find the 
perfect studying location. 

Hoping a last mintue check will bring her 
all the luck she needs, a student finishes 
studying outside the exam room. 




A 







by Samantha Steel 



It comes along twice a year and no matter Ikjw hard you try 
you cannot escape it. It's final exams! For the three study days 
and the week of exams, students all over campus are stressed, 
sleep-deprived and bordering on insanity. Coffee is drunk by 
the gallon and snack foods are a studying requirement. The 
proper dress code is sneakers, sweats, ponytails and baseball 
hats. Exam time is like no other time all year long. 

Freshman have the heavy burden of five exams while seniors 
hope to have only one or two. Students having five exams in 
three days is a common occurrence and one you hope not to 
have to endure. For some, exam period is the time to try to pull 
your first all-nighter and pray for a good outcome. The knowl- 
edge that at the end of the week is a much deserved vacation is 
a great incentive. 

The places students study is a personal choice. From Bapst 
to Fulton, from O'Neill to O'Connell House an empty space is 
hard to find. Loaded down with books, notebooks, pens, travel 
mugs and snacks, residents quickly fill up study lounges in each 
of the dorms. In May, when the weather begins to warm up, 
blankets on Bapst lawn, in front of Robsham, or around the 
Reservoir are the place to be. 

There are those who look for any excuse not to study. In 
December, the need to shop for holiday gifts is always placed 
above the Biology exam. In May the sun and fun of spring lures 
students out of their dorms and the library. Many take breaks 
in order to run or workout to relieve their stress. Another stress 
breaker is the nightly eleven o'clock scream which can be heard 
from Upper campus to the mods. 

All in all, exam time is a crazy and unique time at BC. Rules 
are thrown out the window and students do what they can to 
cope and survive. Each year it gets a bit easier to deal with the 
pressures and by senior year you have it down to a science. Just 
don't forget your notebook, a cup of the free coffee and the 
number for Late-Night Cookie and you'll be all set. 




Alumni Stadium took on a new look this 
year when the field was covered with a 
bubble to allow for winter practices. 

Higgins underwent major reconstruction 
throughout the year in order to expand 
the academic building and labs. 

Newton Campus had a new addition as 
the new Law School building was 
completed. 



^I^M^Vi^S^ 



72 Changing Times 




ChanglngTmes 

New And Improved 



by Samantha Steel 

Boston College saw a lot of changes this year. Buildings were 
completed, construction began, and services were redesigned. 
All over, new and exciting things were happening. Most visible, 
were the Higgins construction sight on Middle campus and the 
bubble over Alumni Stadium during the winter months. The 
entire front of the Higgins academic building was removed in 
order to expand the building. The construction caused many 
students to look for a new route to Middle campus as the stairs 
from lower were closed off. 

After the football season was over, Alumni also received a 
new look. A bubble was installed over the field to allow for 
winter practice for many sports teams including football, la- 
crosse, baseball and Softball. The encasement will also serve to 
protect the field from the harsh winter weather. 

Lyons Hall underwent interior changes when student ser- 
vices took on a new location. All student services were placed 
within one office, Lyons 101, to better serve the student body. 
It is now one-stop shopping! 

One major change occurred during second semester when 
Peter Lynch announced his endowment gift of over $ 1 Million 
to the School of Education. Next fall, the School of Education 
will be renamed the Peter S. and Carolyn A. Lynch School of 
Education. This was the largest individual donation given to 
Boston College. It will provide numerous resources and pro- 
gramming for the SOE. 

Throughout the year and continuing through next year and 
beyond, EC's expansion serves to improve its academic and 
student services. As long as BC continues to grow and prosper, 
it will continue to strive to excel and succeed through change. 



Laure^Pringlc 



JoiningTogdier 









T 

JL he 



he student 
organizations at Boston College 
represent the leadership, 
determination, and goodwill 
found within the undergraduate 
student body. Flyers and 
banners across campus 
announce upcoming 

performances and club 
meetings. From journalism to 
government, from honor 
societies to performing arts, 
there is a group or activity which 
can meet the interests and needs 
of anyone. 



Activities 



UGBC 1998-99: 
McMahan & O'Shea 



'Dear Teffow StucCents of 'Boston Coffege's Cfass ofiggq, 

'At tfie Beginning oftfiis year most of you were jyrofiafify asked the (question: 
"'}{ow does it feet to 6e almost finished with 'SC?" 

I'his simvCe (Question yrohahiy has a few answers. Ours: VJe are not aimost finished, on the con- 
trary we are harefy beginning. I'he vast four years have heen perhaps the most unicjue andfufiff- 
ing years we have ever experienced 'However, these past four years are onCy a point of departure. 

i'his past summer we heard 'Father idmes answer the cjuestion, jposed hxf a parent of 
an incoming student at Treshman Orientation: "What is the higgest prohCem with higher educa- 
tion today?" ids answer was short, -yet ad too reafistic. T other 'Himes stated that tneprohfem with 
higher education today is the misunderstanding that the purpose of a cofCege or a university is to 
provide the student with ajoh. Whife he recognized that receiving a joh was ajyfeasant resuht of 
receiving a coffege degree, he proclaimed that the purpose of a college education was to help us 
prepare for our fives, not just a career. In a fetter addressed to the student hodxj on September 28, 
1999, Tather Leahy reminded us that '"BC is committed to exceffence and encourages affon campus 
to devefop our tafents so we can he better human beings andhefp make our worfdmore just." 
I'herefore, we are not at an end, nor are we simpfy stepping into a career. Ilather, we are stepping 
into fife, ecjuipped with the toofs to hefp oursefves cjrow and to bring happiness to and enrich the 
fives of those around us. 

T'he past four years have been incredibfe. 'But our time here has given us the 
tafent and integrity to make affthe rest of our years even more extraordinary. 

We wish you afi weffin your fife paths. 

Sincerefy, 

'Patrick and (^erard 




76 Government 




Government 7' 




UGBC Senate 




< 



jovernmenr 




UGBC Cabinet 




M 



Government /9 



School of Education 



Senate 



The School of Education Senate is the undergraduate government of the School of Educa- 
tion at Boston College. The group is composed of four officers, a secondary education 
minor representative from the College of Arts & Sciences, a representative to UGBC and 25 
senators which come from each of the four classes. The SOE Senate serves as a liason 
between the students and the administration and academic offices of the schoU. This is 
accomplished through signs and mailings, and through the hosting of various programs 
throughout the year. Ranging from Campion Day to the Spirit of Education Week, the goal 
of each event is to bring students closer to one another and closer to the school, while 
providing information and enjoyment in the process. 



President: GragGagliardi 
Vice President: Christina Fraga 
Secretary: Heather R ussell 
Tresurer: Pamela Robertson 



82 Senate 



Festival of 
Friendship 




Kathleen Kearney 
Erin Anderson 



Photo by Uuren Pr 

This is the sixteenth year that Festival of Friendship has been active on the Boston College 
campus. It is a one day event held on campus for local special needs students. Over 200 
Boston College volunteers are involved in making this day possible. Boston College clubs 
and organizations staff carnival games and activities while entertainment is provided by 
various BC performance groups. Volunteers are buddies for the day to assist special needs 
guests in enjoying festivities. It is a fun and rewarding afternoon for both special needs 
guests and Boston College volunteers. 



Friendship 



School of Management 
Government 



The School of Management Government (SOMG) is the official governing 
body of the Carroll School of Managemnt. The SOMG acts as an umbrella 
organization that fosters unity and information exchange between CSOM 
students, faculty, and the academies. The government sponsors various events 
for CSOM students during the academic year. Such events in the past have 
included guest speakers series, student leader banquets, golf tournaments, 
newsletters, as well as workshops and socials designed to assist students in 
pursuing their studies and future career paths. Their is no better way to meet 
new people and have an impact on your envirnoment then the School of 
Management Government. 



President: Sudhir Nair 
Vice President-James Skinner 
Treasurer: Wade Saadi 



84 Senate 



President: Bill Beauchesne 
Vice Presidents-Jessica Crespo, Alaina 
DeVasto,Kristen Farrell 
Treasurer: Heather McSweeney 



AccountingAcademy 



The Boston College Accounting Academy is a student organization estab- 
lished by and run by accounting students. The Academy has been established 
to provide declared and prospective accounting majors with services pertain- 
ing to their future careers. In order to provide opportunitites to come in 
contact with potential future employers, the Academy organizes events where 
students, teachers, and employers can come together in a relaxed, but profes- 
sional environment. The Academy is also dedicated to assisting those stu- 
dents who are in need of academic help by providing tutors for Financial and 
Managerial Accounitng. 



Accounting 85 ;j 



MaihtingAcadem)/ 




Photo Court.scy of [he Academy 



The Boston College Marketing Academy was established in the Wallace E. Carroll School ot 
Management as a pre-professional organization. The Marketing Academy serves to offer 
students of all majors the opportunity to gain firsthand knowledge about careers in market- 
ing. This is achieved through interaction with professionals, professors, and peers. The 
Academy also aids students in finding internship and job opportunities through the 
Academy's various contacts. The Marketing Academy strives to encourage student and 
professor interaction on a social and casual level by sponsoring informal student and 
professor gatherings. 



President: Gregory B. Mihal 
Vice President: Kimherly Lam 
Secretary: Kimherly Andrcotta 
Treasurer: Kathleen Wickham 



86 Marketing 



Investment club 



Designed to help students develop equity research and portfolio management skills, the 
Boston College Investment Club (BCIC) gives undergraduates the opportunity to manage 
a portion of the university's endowment. Now worth over Si 60,00, the portfolio consists 
of about 20 stocks, including companies like General Electric, Barnes & Noble, Microsoft, 
and T. Rowe Price. In addition to managing the portfolio, the club also sponsors speakers 
from the investment community to share their experiences with its members. This year the 
club grew by initiating an Analyst Program, BCIC presence on the internet, and a Charity 
Program. Founded in 1983 by a Junior Economics major, William Doty, the BCIC was 
one of the first undergraduate investment clubs in the country. 



President: J an Kostrzewski 
Vice President: Patrick L. Venanzi 
chief Invest Oj: Sean Howell 
Dir of Research: Shane Smith 



Investments 87 



Acoustics 




Six years ago a group of upstart singers and theatrical players )oined forces to forge the 
cosmic entity known as the Acoustics. The Acoustics have travelled from to coast to coast, 
with pit stops at the Jeopardy studio in LA, the Delta Center, home of the Utah Jazz, and 
the Good Times lazertag arena in Somerville. The crew can usually be found belting out the 
tunes of such notables as Lauryn Hill, the Dave Matthews Band, Madonna, Billy Joel, and 
Jefferson Starship. The busy 98-99 season saw the arrival of several talented new voices, the 
release of the group's third album, and a tour in the nation's capital, where the group 
performed at area colleges and high schools and capped off the week with an appearance at 
the city's National Cath :lral. 



President: Kara Graziano 
Businessijon Geldert 
Music Director: Brian Sheehan 
Secr./Treas : Nicole Estvanik 



A Capella 



Bostonians 




Co 'Music Director:Jenntfer Ellis 
Co 'Music Director: Dave Petrelli 
Business Manager: Mike O'Brien 
Exec. Director: Neil Sutton 



The Bostonians, in their rwelfth year on EC's campus, have expanded both musically and 
in membership. The members come from as diverse locations as Denver and Vermont, 
Saudi Arabia and California. This diversit}', they hope, is also represented in their reper- 
toire, vi^hich ranges from The Black Crowes to Peter Cetera, The Barenaked Ladies to 
Custer. The group most enjoys performing here on campus, as they consider performing 
for the hometown crowd to be an honor and a privilege. The Bostonians have been lucky 
enough to host the National Collegiate A Capella competition for the last three years, and 
were honored to do so again this year. They look forward to further success, fun and 
excitement and encourage all BC students to attend a performance. 



A Capella 89 



BC sharps 




PhotoCourcSL) ot Sharps 



Dressed to kill and filled with voices that amaze audiences, the BC Sharps have been 
entertaining the community of Boston College with their dynamic performances since 
1990. This 16 member all female a capella group sings a wide range of music. They have 
challenged themselves by singing a variety of male artists such as REM and U2, but still 
love singing Aretha and Madonna. The Sharps have accepted the challenge of being an all 
female and have been acknowledged as one of the top female a capella groups in the nation. 
They currently have three recordings out and are planning to release a fourth this Spring. 
The 16 ladies perform at events on campus and take their talent on the road to many 
college up and down the east coast. 



Business: Mary Alex Dundics 
Music Director: Beth Becker 
Group Manager: Stephanie Ford 
Tresurer: Cathy Tucker 



Mi 



90 A Capella 



Hei^tsmen 



The Heightmen of Boston College is a rwelve to sixteen member all-male a capella group 
dedicated to musical excellance and the unadulterated pursuit of fun. Organized in 1990, 
this group has quickly established itself as a prominent musical group on campus. From 
cartoons, to classic, rap to do-wop, the student run Heightmen perform from a wide 
musical repertoire. Auditions are held throughout the year and are open to all tenors and 
basses of the Boston College community. 



President: Chris Kiely 
Business: Paul B evens 
Co -Music: Matt Baldwin 
Tresurer.Koh Takeuchi 



A Capella 91 



chorale 




The University Chorale of Boston College began as a small glee club in the late ninetieth 
century. Today its membership includes 180 members of the Boston College community: 
students, Jesuits, faculty, and staff. Under the direction of John Finney, the Chorale season 
was kicked off in September at the Pops on the Heights Scholarship Gala. Spring Break 
found the Chorale on its annual world tour, this time to Ireland, as they sang several 
concerts and benefits throughout Dublin, Killarney, and Galway. One of the largest 
student-run organizations on campus, the members of the University Chorale find 
themselves amidst a world of opportunity to share their voices, see the world, and build 
extraordinary friendships. 



President: Mary Catherine Savard 
Vice President: Brad Battaglia 
Secretaries: Catherine Tobin/ Neil Sutton 
Social Director: Michael O'Brien 



92 Vocal Performance 



LiturgyArts 




officers: Anna Smith 
Sara Camden 
Jo -Anne Landry 
Jeremy Zipple 



Phoro Counscy of Liturg)' / 

The Liturgy Arts Gtoup serves the community of Boston College by sharing our special gift 
of music at the regular weekend liturgies and at various events on campus. With song and 
instrument, the Liturgy Arts Group provides a wide repertoire of music to enliven and 
enrich the experience of worship. As pilgrims on a journey, the students in LAG envision 
facilitating liturgical participation as a privilege. Through praise of God in song, the 
community at prayer finds its way to greater depth and joy in its service to others. LAG 
meets regularly for rehearsal and prayer, and especially tries to foster community among 
our freshman members. They recently released their first CD entitled "I Want To Praise 
Your Name." In this venture, they celebrate the promise of the Lord. 



Liturgy Arts 93 



And the Band 
PkyedOn 





94 Band 












Band 95 



ScdtSiMt 



The Salt & Light Company is an organization sponsored and supported by 
the University Chaplaincy of Boston College. The mission of the Salt & Light 
Comapny is to encourage Christian faith and action among all who choose to 
be apart of the community. The mission is acomplished by emphasizing the 
following five components: Spirituality, Community, Ministry, Outreach, and 
Celebration. Salt & Light is a welcoming "community of friends" within the 
larger community of Boston College. The members are diverse in background 
and experience, but united in one desire to grow as people of faith. You will 
find Salt & Light is a fun place to be: where friendships are made, laughter is 
encouraged, and peer support is always available. 



Enforcer: Tim O'Rourke 
Gen Mtg Coord: Sarah Lick 
Lighthouse Grp:Jim Spillman 
Mentoring Prgrm: Kate Pescatore 



96 Salt & Light 



HtM 



President: Ari Shapiro 

Vice President: Mindy Aguirre 

Treasurer :Nily Weill 



Hillel, The Jewish Students Association, has been extremely active this year 
on campus and regionally, participating in events sponsored by other univer- 
sities in the Boston area. At a predominately Catholic campus, its mission is 
two-fold: 1) to provide resources and a community for Jewish students; 2) to 
raise awareness on campus of Jewish cultural and historical events. The 
former component is accomplished both through social gatherings on and off 
campus and group trips to synagogues and other Hillels for services at the 
holiday times. Raising Jewish awareness is achieved by hosting a Jewish 
lecture series, holding intercultural religious celebrations, and by affiliating 
with other Jewish-related programs held on campus. 



Hillel 97 



Order of the 
Cross and Crown 




The Order of the Cross and Crown is an honor society reserved to members ot the senior 
class of the College of Arts and Sciences. Seniors with a 3.5 average or better will be invited 
by mail to apply for membership to the Cross and Crown in the summer before their senior 
year. Consistent membership and leadership in major campus extracurricular activities and a 
minimum average of 3.5 is the basis for admission. Members are inducted in a ceremony 
each spring. The student commencement speaker for the College of Arts and Sciences is the 
Chief Marshal of the Cross and Crown. 



98 Honor 



BellarmineLaw 
Academy 



One of the oldest organizations on campus, the Bellarmine Law Academy is a pre- 
professional organization at Boston College that serves as a resource and guide for those 
students interested in the study and practice of law. Committed to this role, the BLA 
coordinates a lecture series, arranges workshops and field trips, holds social functions, 
publishes a monthly journal, and sponsors three mock trial teams for national 
intercollegiate competition. 



President: Joseph Strazzeri 
Vice President: Henry Glavin 
Secretary/ Treasurer: LonnieMasso 



Bellarmine 99 



Urban Immersion 




Phoros Courtsey of Chaplaincy 



100 Urban Immersion 




The Boston College Urban Immersion program explores the questions, What is poverty? How 
can I help homeless people? What are the problems and possibilities of urban life today? Students, 
selected for the program by lottery, may choose either a week in Boston or a weekend in 
Lawrence, MA to engage in direct service with impoverished people, to study some of the many 
issues confronting city-dwellers, and to form a community of prayer and hope with other student 
participants. Offered during both semesters, the week-long program brings students to Jamaica 
Plains, where during the day projects may include service at a foodbank and outreach to local 
elderly. Evening seminars acts a discussions on a variety of urban issues, from racism to 
homelessness. The weekend program is offered several times a year and brings students to 
Lawrence, MA where they have the opportunity to work with the homeless people of that city. 
Interested students should contact BC Chaplaincy. 



Urban Immersion 101 




102 Drama 




Drama 103 



DanceEnsemhk 




Photos Courtsey of Dance Ensemble 



104 Dance 




The Boston College Dance Ensemble, in all its functions and duties, strives to provide an open 
and free haven for both the extension of creative choreography, and the perpetuation of excellent 
performance. The completely student directed Dance Ensemble allows for dancers to transcend 
their talents to a level of perfection while also granting the opportunity to further creativity and 
experimentation in the realm of choreography. As dancers, the Ensemble strives to provide a 
better understanding of the art form of dance to the Boston College community, as well as 
perpetuating their own knowledge and technique. The essence of the Boston College Dance 
Ensemble is found in its success in continuing to light the passion for dance, the Art in Motion, 
so long held in the hearts of the dancers of die Boston College community. 



Dance 105 



Irish Society 



The Bosotn College Irish Society was founded on a committment to both the Irish culture 
and a culturally diverse student body. The Irish Society, as a campus organization, seeks to 
show this committment through a promotion of all facets of Irish culture within the context 
of a diverse student body. Some of the elements that the club focuses on are Irish history, 
music, food, dancing, and current events. In the clubs founding years, the Irish Society was 
considered to be more of a social club, but in recent years the club has become very involved 
and interested in the peace process in Northern Ireland. In conjuniction with the Irish 
Institutethis, the Society attended a lecture by Peace Watch Ireland, a video-viewing explain- 
ing the history of the conflict, and multiple roundtable discussions. 



President: Meghann Drayna 
Vice President: Eileen Reilly 
Secretmy: Sean Keithly 
Tresurer: Kevin Meehan 



106 Irish 



T 



Armenian Club 




Co 'President: Kaffi Karakashian 
Co 'President: Talin Getzoyan 
Vice Presidentjustin Shaghalian 
Secretary: Elizabeth Hughes 



Phoio by Laui 

In recent years, the Armenian Club, has had over fifty members who participate in numer- 
ous events both on and off campus. Each year, the club sponsors the popular Cafe Night 
where members and friends enjoy traditional Armenian delicacies. They have also attended 
cultural, educational, religious, and social events in Watertown, the "Little Armenia" of 
Boston. This past October, the club exhibited Aremenian treasures in the O'Neill Library 
showcase in an exhibit called "Cradles of Civilization." Items were donated by club 
members and Project SAVE. Each April, the club commemorates the anniversary of the 
Aremenian Genocide of 1915 with either on or off campus events, such as newspaper 
advertisements to raise awareness or participating in a march through Watertown. 



Armenian 1 



the Heists 




Photo Submitted by Heights 



"The Independent Student Weekly of Boston College' 



Editor- in - Chief. Lori I. Lefevre 
Business Manager: Steve Barwickowski 
News Editor: Tim Garry 



108 Heights 



EaMeTV 



w^^ 



Eagle TV of Boston College is a student run organization which encourages 
students within the club to write, direct, produce and edit television pro- 
grams for Boston College cable television. Eagle TV students work together 
to generate ideas for television programs and work together as a team on 
project from start to finish. Eagle TV enables all students in the club to get 
involved whether it be in front of the camera, behind the camera, or in the 
editing room. They support and promote all club members to get involved. 



t! 



President: Colleen Donovan 
Vice President: Kathryn Thomas 
Vice President of Video Yearbook: 
MattRutedge 



Eagle TV 109 



WZBC 




WZBC is a completely student-run organization, which operates two different and iuWy 
operational radio stations. WZBC-FM is found at 90.3 and is home to music that you can 
not find on anywhere else on the dial in Boston. WZBC-FM focuses mostly on indepen- 
dent, underground rock and its unique nighttime format called "No Commercial Poten- 
tial." On NCP shows you may hear electric, avant-garde, noise, or ambient music. ZBC is 
open to interested students and community members as well. WVBC, WZBC-FM 's sister 
station, is found on channel 47 on Boston College Cable and is pumped directly into the 
Eagle's Nest. 



General Manager: Ben Hill 

Director of Operations: Evan Dooley 

Program Director] ay Moschella 

Promotions Director: Kelly Milward 

Music Director: John Neylon 

Director of Opreationsfor WVBC: Mikejoel 



m 



no WZBC 



stylus 




Editor-in-chief. Amanda Chahupak 
Sen. Assoc Editor: Nicole Estvanik 
Associate Editor: Jason Cavallari 
Associate Editor: Stephanie Hartman 



Stylus, the art and literature magazine ot Boston College, was founded in 1882 and is the 
oldest literaty magazine at a Catholic college in the Americas. It is also EC's oldest publica- 
tion, and has evolved much during its years in print. The Stylus of today focuses on the 
review and publication of original writing and art by BC undergraduates. Pieces are 
reviewed anonymously by the editorial board and then by the general staff, made up of BC 
students who meet weekly to read and discuss submissions. Staff vote determines wether a 
piece will appear in Stylus. Stylus is not only dedicated to showcasing the creativity and 
skill of BC students, but providing an environment in which writers and artists may get 
honest feedback on their work. Meetings are open to evetyone. 



Stylus 111 



Chinese student 



f . f 



Assoctatton 



The Chinese Students' Association (CSA) of Boston College is a cultural 
club within Asian Caucus (AC). Their main objective is to promote and raise 
the social and cultural understanding and awareness of the Chinese culture, 
to both the BC community and the public. Just like any other cultural club 
within BC, it is open to all and they are glad to present anyone that is 
interested in the Chinese heritage and culture as best they can, through 
various activities and events. This year events included a picnic at George's 
Island, a bowling night at Boston Bowl, and a Masquerade party in support 
for China's Flood, this years AC charity fund. 



President: Allen Kwang 
Vice President: Wilbur Lau 
Secretary: Mui Chang 
Treasurer: Pamela Wu 



112 C.S.A 



BCABSK 



Boston College 

ABSK 

ALSian Baptist Student ^2^5 



|MMg \ - :P>^^ . ^K. -Jill 

President: Alan Pan 

Vice President: Hero Sultando 

Treasurer: Matthew Hua 




Photo Submitted by ABSK 

The Boston College Asian Baptist Student Koinonia (BC ABSK) is a Christian campus 
ministry seeking to provide for the spiritual needs of Asian and other students during their 
years at Boston College. ABSK was founded in the Fall of 1991 at Harvard College. One 
year later in 1992, Boston College students began to meet for Bible studies on campus. 
ABSK quickly spread across the Boston area, ministering to college students, graduate 
students and young adults from all walks of life. ABSK holds weekly Bible studies, study 
breaks, retreats and prayer meetings. "A new command I give you: Love one another. As I 
have loved you, so you must love one another." John 13:34 



BCABSK 113 



Rebir^ cfjazz 




The Rebirth of Jazz club is based on the idea of creating an entity on campus with the \Aii/(> J nvnhnvrin 

fundamental purpose of exposing students to jazz. The idea behind the club was first 

conceived during the spring semester of 1998. It began with a group of juniors, now seniors, A/ltKE AUUd 

who enjoyed getting together to listen to jazz as well as hanging out at different jazz clubs 

and venues in Boston. After some thought and consideration, they realized that they could MlKC BCCltttC 

provide the opportunity to bring jazz to BC. The club has two major functions; one is to ^ 

hold meetings during which club members will become acquainted with the history of jazz, iKCLy htlU 

the different kinds of jazz music and some of its creators and pioneers. Secondly, the a j. ' 

Rebirth of Jazz hosts monthly performances by both student and professional bands. JUmci /MUUlnc 



114 Jazz 



Voices of Imani 



The Voices of Imani was organized in the fail of 1978. Created as a mechanism to celebrate 
the viability, potency, and beauty of gospel music, the choir has not only served as a source 
of spiritual inspiration, but also as a needed source of unity and strength among students of 
color. The Voices of Imani wishes to explore and share the full wealth of black people— be 
it African folk songs, calypso, or American Negro Spirituals. In addition, the Voices of 
Imani explore and sing traditional and contemporary themes in songs from around the 
world. The membership is open to all BC students as well as students outside of Boston 
College. Any individual interested in spreading the Word of the Lord through the beauty 
of music is encouraged to join. 



President: A dele Reed 
Vice President: Raquel Webster 
Secretary: Alexandra Calixte 
Tresurer: Rasani Reynoso 



Voices 115 



Associationfor 
ComputingMachinery 



The Association for Computing Machinery is the world's oldest and largest 
educational and scientific computing society. Today, AMC serves a member- 
ship of more than 80,000 computing professionals in more than 100 countries 
in all areas of industry, academics, and government. The Boston College 
chapter strives to promote interest in the field of Computer Science. By 
bringing together students and faculty, they hope to provide a forum in which 
people can share common interests outside of the classroom. Aside from 
monthly meetings, this chapter hosts a guest lecture series, attends outside 
lectures at other Colleges and Universities, partakes in the annual AMC 
Programming Contest, and much more. All are invited to join and participate. 





President: YunPang 
Vice President: Federico Lucifredi 
Secretary: Bob Hatcher 
Treasurer: Joseph Jerista 



116 AMC 



Peer Education 
Network 



The Peer Education Network (PEN) is a student-run organization that 
works towards raising campus awareness concerning a variety of issues, as 
well as serving as a resource to the entire BC community. PEN consists of 
three distinct divisions namely, HEART (Helping to Educate Alcohol 
Responsibly Together) HAPPEN (HIV/AIDS Prevention Peer Education 
Network) and SANET (Sexual Assault Network). Throughout the course of 
the academic year peer educators are very visible around campus, be it by 
running a particular program or by tending an information table in the 
McElroy lobby. Many of their programs are included as part of the awareness 
weeks that PEN sponsors on campus, such as World AIDS Week, Safe 
Spring Break Week, and Sexual Responsibility Week. 



Student Coordinator: Ryan Travia 
HEART Coordinator: Ktm Andreotta 
HAPPEN Coordinator: Ryan Travia 
SANE T Coordinator: Ju/ie DelaCruz 



PEN 117 



Appahchia Volunteers 





The Appalachia Volunteer Program is a student-run club sponsored by the University 
Chaplaincy. Started in 1978, the organization has grown to become one of the largest 
volunteer groups on campus and the largest group of Appalachia Volunteers in the country. 
The trips take place over Spring Break, and the preparation begins in September. Program 
members participate in mandatory weekly meetings to learn the history of each destination 
and to contribute to fund-raising efforts. 450 Boston College students travel in 36 vans to 
various sites throughout the Appalachia regions of Kentucky, West Virginia, Virginia, North 
and South Carolina, and Maine. Tasks range from heavy construction to small jobs around 
the town, with a high level of community involvement. 



Head: Bill Kerrigan 
Head: Tracy Madsen 



1 



118 Appalachia 



Ignacio Volunteers 




The Ignacio Volunteer programs are a series of international volunteer service immersion 
experiences for Boston College undergraduates. The program provides opportunities to 
work and to live in another culture with those of greatest need. Volunteers are selected 
three to six months before the trip and meet regularly. There are regular reflections before, 
during, and after the experience. Volunteers fund-raise to assist on covering costs. Winter 
programs, include Mexico, Jamaica, and Belize experiences which take place during 
semester break. Summer camps consist of trips to Belize, Jamaica and the Dominican 
Republic. 



Ignacio 119 



CirdeK 



The Boston College Circle K Club was founded in 1991 and continues to 
flourish today, boasting 35 active members. Circle K International, sponsored 
by Kiwanis International, is dedicated to the ideals of Service, Leadership and 
Fellowship in colleges and universities around the world. The BC Circle K 
Club is a member of the New England District of Circle K, which consists of 
20 clubs from Maine to Rhode Island. Through interactive volunteer opportu- 
nities, social events, conferences and conventions, and district involvement, the 
BC Circle K Club is a leader in the New England District. During the 1998- 
1999 academic year, the BC Circle K Club completed over 2,500 hours of 
community service. 



Governor: Anne-Mariejannace 
Secretary/Treas. : Elizabeth Kane 
District chair: Stephanie Shalkoski 



120 Circle K 



Campus School 



The Campus School Volunteers of Boston College is a volunteer group made 
up of just under 200 members with 1 1 committees that help to coordinate 
our programs with the students, our communication with the BC commu- 
nity, and our fundraising events. Since the club began three years ago, they 
have donated over $35,00 to the Campus School and continue to fmdraise 
through events such as the Annual Beanpot Alumni Tournament, a golf 
tournament, out on-going, large-scale recycling program, and by having 
people run in the Boston Marathon. They have also had enormous success 
this year with the buddy and swim programs, as well as various special events 
such as holiday parrties, literacy month, and a pre-game pep rally. 



VresidentiAiarguerite Colton 
Vice President: Peter A f^drem 
Secretary: HeatherAshley 
Co - Tresurers: T racy Lituri, Jill Opubk 



Campus School 121 



Womens Resource Center 



WRC is open to all women and men who are concerned with women's issues. 
It is a supportive environment where diverse opinions and perspectives can be 
voiced and respected. The primary function of the WRC is the exploration 
and promotion of women's issues through educational outreach. 



Coordinator: Lani Jones 
Staff. Alex Calixte 
Staff.] ung Chi 
Staff. Christine Safaret 



^\ll W.R.C. 



LGBC 



The Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Community at Boston College is an unrecog- 
nized, non-funded student group which serves as an educational, supportive 
and social organization for members of the University. As well as hosting 
several university wide programs throughout the year, LGBC meets weekly to 
provide a supportive environment for gay, lesbian, bisexual and straight 
students. LGBC also sponsors dorm and classroom lectures to educate a wider 
university community on issues of sexual diversity. Celebrating its 25th years 
at BC this year, LGBC continues its mission of fostering a supportive, proud, 
open minded and diverse community at Boston College. 



Exec. Director: Danielle Murray 
Dir for Prog: Vincent Tamuzza 



LGBC 123 



fV:, {"vf^Vj^^^v? 



FimnceAcadetny 



-"^ST: 





The Boston College Finance Academy is a student run organization whose intent is to inform Vyacitlt^fif- (^hri'i: Tinu>I/'r 

students of all the opportunities available to them in the world of Finance. A main objective of 

the academy is to bring together the academic and business worlds through meetings, panels and V/rg PVCSidctit' IcffTUSd 

career nights. Events are planned to benefit members in matters such as general information on 

current topics in Finance, career planning and possible job placement. The Academy also offers SCCVCtUfVl CnVistilKJ ZUffWdl'dt 

services such as career and academic peer advisement. 

Treasurer: Kim Franko 



' 124 Finance Academy 



I 



RPSE 



The RPSE (Coalition of Role-Players and Strategic Enthusiasts) is an organi- 
zation founded less than a decade ago by a small group of individuals inter- 
ested in role-playing, board, and strategy games. The club's purpose is to 
locate individuals at BC with an interest in playing role-playing or strategy 
games, to introduce them to each other, and to create an environment in 
which those individuals can find enjoyment and the opportunity for artisitc 
expression through those games. In addition the club maintains organization 
between the games, so new members can be referred to games matching their 
areas of interest and so the games can be continued from year to year. Cur- 
rently the club possesses a large library of challenging and eclectic games for 
members to borrow and enjoy. 



SovereigniTom Worhoys 
Viceroy: Sean Donnelly 
Miser: Bill Mullally 
Herald: Matt Bosse 



Campus School 125 



Asian Christian 
Fellowship 





Phoio Courcsey of ASF 



Asian Christian Fellowship is a nondenominational Christian establishment that is open to 
everyone. They hold weekly meetings and events to encourage genuine fellowship in the 
name of Jesus Christ and also to foster a deeper understanding of the Bible. The meetings 
consist of a period of praise and worship, followed by a guest speaker, continued with a time 
devoted to small group discussions, concluded with large group time fellowship. ACF serves 
the goal of reaching out to the collegiate community at Boston College with the gospel of 
Jesus Christ. Secondly, it serves the purpose of developing deep and meaningful relationships 
within the body of believers and lastly ACF is committed to the development of leaders and 
preparing them to assist in God's work wherever their future might lead them. 



HeadiSteven H. Kang 
Treasurer :Rex Hamano 
Secretary iSimone Cho 
Communications-Jessica Chu 



126 Asian Christian Fellowship 



IJ 




ChiAlpha 



The mission of the Boston College chapter of Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship is to 
reconcile students to Jesus Christ and thereby transform the University, the marketplace 
and the world. They have a five-fold philosophy to accomplish this: through fellowship, 
worship, witness, discipline, and prayer. They meet in small group Bible studies on 
campus, as well as main meetings on Wednesday nights. Once a month all of the Boston 
chapters meet on a city-wide level, to learn from an encourage each other. 



ChiAlpha 127 



48 Hours 





48 Hours, sponsored by the University Chaplaincy, is a program designed to help first-year 
students reflect on early experiences at Boston College. Led by a team of seniors and 
sophomore point-guards, students have an opportunity to share their thoughts about critical 
pieces of college life: Freedom and Responsibility, Academics, Co_curricular Involvement, 
Unexpected Social Pressures and Friends and Relationships. The weekends are held at 
various locations in New England and provide a fun and relaxing atmosphere to meet more 
than ] 00 pe^)i>le. 






128 48 Hours 



Directors: 
Gerard O'Shea 
MarkPedulh 
EdZacharias 



Projectiooo 



Project 2000 is a program which allows Boston College students to serve as 
mentors and tutors. Five to seven Saturdays a semester, 30-40 4th and 5th 
grade students from John Marshall elementary school in Dorchester come to 
the Boston College campus. They go over their homework, play educational 
games, and have arts and crafts in the morning. The afternoons allows them 
to organize recreational activities and just play. This past year they went to 
the movies, science museum, and had alot of fun. The program is open for 
any BC students who love life and like to play games. The program has 
existed for many years, but was only recently made a club two years ago by 
its current directors. 



Project 2000 129 



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these are^ days... 

I: d i t o r s " L a u r c n M . P r i n g 1 c &: S a in a ii i li a S t e e 



T 

JL he 



lev will DC cne 



best days of your life. Parents, 
friends and others tell us stories 
about their own college years; 
the fun, the tears, the loves, and 
the beers. Outside of the 
classroom, with our friends, our 
roommates; this is where we 
discover who we truly our, and 
where we define the true 
memories of our college career. 
Four years, don't they go by in 
a flash — suddenly, just after 
learning how to pronounce 
McElroy, we are graduates. 



Student Life 



lii. Campus Beautiful 



The Heights 



I as \ oLi ttuci ihe campus ol Boston College, its |-)caut\', spiDi and 
tn<,U\ m lnhIlhi Ui ivinij, inio tilt' mam i^iitc, pasi l^apsi 1 ihiary and Saint 
\hn Hill \oii IK wckonud hv tin; (,, olden l-at;lc. Mvin;; high abo\c 
uiipti m M)ld 'iK nd keeps waiih oxer all helow Middle tatiipiis is home 
to nu t iIk most hieathtakmt; au liiiei tme. Iiom ( .assoii s lolimda to 
f tilt n iti lum, J uii]i|iie aimospheie smiciimds the aeaik title hiiikhngs at 
111, 1 lu 1 )iisiho\\l, one ol the lew "gtecn" speiis on eamptis, is a gteai plaee 
I ) nlt\ dtiimi; niee weathei in the kill and spiang and a snowball light 
w n n Imins', the wiiiiei months. 

I I I I md Newton tamptises will tore\er hold a speeial spot in the hearts 
il ill lU aiidents. It was hete thai ihev got tlieir thsr raste ot eollege, 
espeii iiLtd likeawa-i Ifoni home, and meet then "new" tiiends. kaie-tiighl 
inns to t Ik ("Itih (helote it was leplaeed with (Pauleys) or Stuart, pulhng all- 
m^iitus I. \am lime 111 the lounges, and dorm get-together,s were all part of 
lu shm 111 X eat. 

i I anipiis IS the plaee to be, no matter what \'ear you may be. From 

ih 1 I niiu!. h.ill to the Mods.lowei hasitall. Inuring the honsinglottery, 

i\ 111 wondenng, who will gtt a l)a\ window in '-)() or whieh scn,iorswi 
( 1 hi I \ ind li\e in the soeial hoi spot: the Mods, BC houses e\'cryone 
t alu I s( all ol the students hax'e a Lhanec to live near each other. With 
Hillsides the Mods, Vandetsliee, ')(), kdmonds, Walsh, (id, Voute and 
(jibelh (ioims, lowta eampus houses most ol the uiieletelassmen at BC and 
with tint ni.mv tlorms to Hioose Irom there is something tor e\'ei'vone. 

W iihin theg.iies ot Bc\ ilu re is ,) e omm unity unlike airx'where else. From 
I ppt I t 1 \ewton, tioni i (w\eito MeLlrov, BC is made of places and people 
wl nil lu imujtie .iiid speuak Most alumni remember where they lived 
heshmui ) eai and w hat it was like ro walk onto the campus tor theft rst time, 
B< ^Lts into your heart tlie moment \'ou diix'e into the gate. 



-.Samantha .Steel 






As the sun sets on the Heights, the 
Gasson Tower is silhouetted in a 
contrast of shadow and light. 

An addition to campus this year, the 
floral BC caught many students 
attention as they made their way to 
and from classes. 

Rising high above campus, the 
Gasson Bell Tower and clock are a 
reminder to hurry to class. 



Campus 133 



134 Quadrangle 




The Quad is always busy when the 
sun is shining inbetween classes and 
at the end of the day. 

Students gather outside of Lyons 
passing time before or after classes 
talking about weekend or evening 
plans. 

The benches in the Quad serve as a 
great place to eat lunch or sneak in 
some last minute studying before a 
test. 




The Hang-()ui Zone 



The Quad 



Looking around as you sit on one of the benches in the Quad, you begin 
U) realize the beauty which surrounds the students at Boston College. The 
( iiisson Tower chimes, reminding students to hurry to class, while perspec- 
tive students file into Devlin Hall to attend an information session. Conver- 
sations drift from the groups gathered on the Lyons steps and in front of 
r'ulton. The trees, dotted along the paths between building, provide a shady 
study area in the spring, arc aglow with golden leaves in the fall, and glisten 
in the winter when they are full of icicles. Everything is peaceful and quiet 
-- until classes let out. 

No where on campus has more activity, on a daily basis, than the Quad. 
Students huddle in small circles and greetings are shouted through the air. 
It is standing room only as people sit to read, talk, or enjoy an outdoor lunch. 
If you sit there long enough you will probably see everyone you know. It is 
the perfect combination of socializing and academics. 

Banners fly from the trees, announcing UGBC candidates and upcoming 
performances at Robsham. As you walk across the brick sidewalks, you are 
sure to step on a flyer announcing a twenty-first birthday. The Quad attracts 
a lot of attention because of its bustling activity. Faculty and students alike 
enjoy all that the Quad has to offer. Situated in the heart of Middle campus, 
the Quad is the center of BC. 



Quadrangle 135 



spirit 



Boston College has always been rich in spirit, as shown in its students 
participation in the many activities offered on campus, in the Boston area, 
or abroad. Students take pride in BC and are not reluctant to show it. More 
visibly though students show their enthusiasm through anything and 
everything maroon and gold. From huge banners flying out of dorm room 
windows and messages written in the lower campus bay widows to people 
dressed and painted head to toe in school colors to mod ceilings painted into 
the BC hockey rink, Boston College students prove to be creative and 
original when it comes to spirit. 

The initiation of the Superfans last year by two seniors brought louder 
crowds to games outfitted in Superfan T-shirts with fighting eagles on them 
and new cheers such as the E-A-G-L-E-S...Eagles!Eagles!Eagles! One of the 
most visible changes this year grew out of the Superfans and was sponsored 
by the Heights. The "gold rush" in early October outfitted students with $3 
Superfan gold shirts, gold "Go Eagle" signs and gold handkerchiefs to wave 
or wear at the games. Students sections at games now became a sea of gold 
cheering fans. 

The student section at football games seemed more lively this year and 
everyone enjoyed dancing and singing along with the band. Throughout the 
game students shouted "Hey baby, I wanna know if you'll be my girl...," 
hummed and heyed to renditions of Gary Glitter's Rock and Roll Part 2, and 
sang the school song with every touchdown. Unexpected events such as 
mascots fights or a random student storming the field in a gold sheet elicited 
cheers from the crowd while many fans got their exercise for the day by doing 
crowd push-ups or hoisting friends on their shoulders so they could lead 
students behind them in various cheers. EC's spirit even proved to be 
weatherproof the night of the Virginia Tech game when pouring rains could 
not stop the golden fans from shouting and applauding for all four quarters. 

Pep rallies throughout the year gave fans a way to thank the teams for 
giving them something to cheer about and for the players to thank the fans 
for their support. Meeting outside of Conte after away games and larger 
sections of fans at away games were more ways that students displayed their 
spirit. Many students spent the Halloween weekend in Miami and any 
hockey game within driving distance from BC was invaded by gold Superfans. 
Even the hockey tournament over Christmas break in Colorado had a good 
amount of Superfans cheering on the Eagles. 

Eagle pride can be seen everywhere and in any kind of weather. The 
Superfans and gold rushes are sure to keep BC rich in spirit and enthusiasm 
while the creativity of students is certain to produce more memorable events. 
Boston College is known for its prevailing school spirit and this last year not 
only exemplified that but brought new ideas and traditions to events that 
created many memories for all students. 



Maia Misura 



136 Spirit 





Spirit 137 



AMILY 1 IME 



Parents Weekend 



Rooms across campus are spic & span, laundry is clean, and 
books are arranged on desks. These are all telltale signs it's Parent's 
Weekend. Freshman are eager to introduce their new friends and 
seniors can't wait to legally tailgate with mom and dad. The 
weekend is always jam packed with family activities and of course 
a dinner away from the dining hall. 

Parents' Weekend began on Friday September 1 8*as parents 
began to arrive on the Heights. This year Student Activities Day 
was held on that Friday and it gave parents the opportunity to 
walk around the Dustbowl with their children. Freshman parents 
could see the many organizations BC has to offer its students and 
Senior parents could visit their children as they manned the tables 
after four years of involvement. 

Later in the evening, the Boston Pops fdled Conte Forum 
for the sixth year. To a sold-out crowd, the Pops saluted Broadway, 
with such music from the Music Man, Oklahoma, and Phantom 
of the Opera. Conductor Keith Lockhart wowed the audience 
with his harmonica talents and his suits, ranging from a stripped 
zoot suit to a gold lame tuxedo. The arena was brought to its feet 
as maroon and gold balloons fell from the ceiling while the Pops 
played "For Boston." 

The Eagles took on the Temple Owls on a perfect football 
Saturday. Before and after the game, parents could be found 
among the many tailgates on Shea Field and in the Mods, as well 
as at the BC sponsored event in the Plex. In the bright sun, parents 
and students alike cheered on the team to a win. 

The weekend came to a close at the Sunday liturgy on 
O'Neill Plaza. The sits filled up quickly and people had to look for 
seats along the steps of the library and in the shade of the trees. 
Throughout the mass, the beautiftrl sounds of the Boston College 
Liturgical Choir echoed across campus. It was then time to say 
good-bye after letting your parents into your BC world and 
showing them what you love about your life in college. 

-Samantha Steel 




138 Parent's Weei. 





Mingling among family and friends, 
tailgaling before the Saturday football 
game is a popular event. 

The Mods are crowded with seniors 
and their families eating, drinking and 
socializing. 

The Pops on the Heights concert, held 
on Friday evening in Conte Forum, is 
one of the highlights of the weekend. 



Parent's Weekend 139 



The City We Love 



Boston 



^ 



Oliver Wendeii Holmes once cilled Boston the "Hub of tHe'Uri.iyerse." 
With its discinct skyline niarked by-thePradenti;d;^nd:HanCoclcBii;ildtft^^^^ 
it is offers everything a big cit)' should vyirJhxkitiChe big city feel, l'her<S are no 
loud noisy streets or overcrowded sidewalks. Boston instead has.; Quaint 
ne!g}dioi:hoods/historically\sights, and beautiful iaSdscapesvICist^ 
treasure of the Northeast, 

Beginning in Kenrnore: Square, the cit)' .hasa puisatingHfeline. Fenway 
Park is orie of the most farapus baseball parksiiii the countxy^ with the history 
of the Red Sois, the trazy fans, and fiie Green Moh.ster, I^ndsdowhe Street 
is home to rhtite than: a Iot hightdubsSrid bars which ate p^pula^^ 'with the 
aurnerouscolkgeStudentsinthe Bpstph iyrea. Li form quickly at places 
such as Bill's Bar, Avalon, Boston Beer Works, and a BC favorite Who's on 
Fij-st.;. 

In tfaeG6lpley-Sqtiare:atea,:yc}u:ar^ 
rants, an:ih<)t3s.:&o|fa the C 
spedalty.shops aftd chain scotes niafc^, Bostdii a sho 
dowtitown, in poWntOwti Crossing, theprigihal Fileiie's Bksernentis a stop 
evttjenecniiistsise at least 6rice.::1Phe bargaitts art unbelievable! Qiiincy 
Marlwt and; Fanutel<Hatt;at& a, Bo^^ 
restaurant, this area is always crowded be it surnnier: or winter. 

The Harbor is where the Bo,ston Tea Patty tbokplace. Yciucait visit USS 
Gottstitutfott ot: the' New Eiiglahd Aquarium, 'Sie FinancialDistriet is 
located directly next to: the TJarbot, with the airport in yiew across the water. 
One::0ther,special section of the city is theNortb End. Thesmell of bakery 
items and garlic fill the streets in this "Little Italy.'*: Duritig the summer 
montks the sireets areclosed off artd saiiir days are celebrated with street fairs 
atid;paradesv::V :;: . , 

Across the Charles: River is Cantbridge, a place associated with great 
minds from Mri" and Harvard. Harvard Square is the; "funky" area of 
Boston. DnBriday nights, punk youngsters gather at the T-stop and there 
»s activii^;' on every corner, Restaurairts have hour waits and people fiil the 
srreccs. It Is a bustling sppt with college students and tourists alike. 

Fioni Keninore to the North End.Bpscon lias a way of life that is all its 
ovv'r>, ilVe nightlife is fullof bright ::lights and dancing bodies, w'feilethe^days: 
AXi kill o;[ men and women in business suits. The Park and the GGmmons are 
J n t he h ea rt of r!i e ci ty and are an aspect of the cit)' which maltes it have heatt. 
just luip on the T and go, wherever you get off there will be something to 
^ee and something you will never forget. 







Looking across the Charles River 
towards Cambridge as the sun falls 
behind the buildings and the evening 
begins. 

The Prudential Building stands tall and 
proud as a symbol and landmark of 
the city. 

The Boston Public Library is guarded 
by the sitting ladies vjUo keep watch. 



Boston l4l 



Head of the Charles 




142 



/\ l3VVJIN(Io.JINiU IMii^l 



Homecoming 



A lavish hotel ballroom on a warm fall night. Sparkling 
attire and rancous laughter. Good turnout, good friends, good 
times. All of the trademarks of a Boston College dance. . . plus the 
sound of a full-force swing band. With the assistance of a few 
swinging tunes and the dazzling displays of numerous lindy- 
hoppers across the floor. Homecoming 1998 took on the 
colorful proportions of a celebration half a century back in time. 

EC's annual semiformalhas historically enjoyed spectacular 
popularity. The 1998 event proved to be no exception: a sold- 
out crowd of 2,200 appeared to dance the night away at the 
Sheraton Hotel and Towers. Ticket-holders were greeted by the 
elegance of a decor draped (of course) in maroon and gold. 
Students were offered the special opportunity of taking a piece 
of the night with them: a professional photographer, hired to 
UGBC, caught memories on film which were later transformed 
into keychain mementos. 

Yet perhaps the most sensational aspect of the evening came 
in the form of the music. Breaking with tradition, UGBC elected 
to supplement the customary deejay format with a taste of 
Boston's latest musical trend, swing. Bellevue Cadillac, a 
hometown favorite, took the stage for hours of original and old- 
time favorites. Swing lessons, offered priorweeks both by Boston 
College and by area clubs, paid off handsomely as couples took 
to the dance floor in droves to show off their newfound mastery. 

Homecoming 1998 was the creation of UGBC 
Programming. Headed by Student Events Coordinators and 
Co-Chairs Nando DiFino(A&S '00) and Chris McTammany 
(CSOM '00), the organizers generated the ides for the novel 
entertainment. Their dedication was met with appreciation by 
those in attendance. "It was nice to see a live band at a BC event," 
commented Tami Minikus, A&S '99. 

Although the Ball generated some controversy in its ticket 
sale policy, allowingonlyonepurchase per student, theprevailing 
theme of the evening was nothing but pure entertainment. From 
the 700+ freshmen present to the large turnout of graduating 
seniors, BC was treated to a night to remember. "My girlfriend 
and I had a great time," remarked Paul Despot, A&S '99. "It was 
another a good BC memory. But then, do they ever really end?" 

- Catherine Deely 



144 Homecoming 




145 Homecomins 




^naatmMaam 



O'Connell House 



With its dark paneled walls and CLirvingscairca.se, O'Connell 
I louse is not a typical Boston (College building. Nesded amidst 
the dormitories of Upper Camptis, O'Connell is Boston College's 
official Student Union, providing a place for meetings, study 
space, and activity. Staffed by five undergraduate students, 
O'Connell House serves the Boston College community with a 
number of activities throughout the year. It also houses the 
offices of the First Year Experience and Drug and Alcohol 
Education. 

This year's staff- Eric Cataldo, Public Realtions Manager; 
Vivian Horn, Community Manager; Michael Montague, 
Program Manager; Thomas Sly, Budget/Physical Plant Manager; 
and Leslie Walters, Publicity Manager- has continued the tradition 
of O'Connell HOuse by hosting a cappella and theater 
performances. Open Mic Night, and Harvest Night. They have 
introduced a new $2 Tuesday trdaition, with a variety of 
programs to entertain students and a chance to win tickets to 
other BC events, as well as a free video rental service with over 
two hundred titles to choose from. 

Perhaps most popular at O'Connell House are the Breaking 
the Barriers Ball, co-sponsored along with UGBC and RHA. 
which meshes BC faculty and students, and the annual 
Middlemarch Ball, an imaginative "theme" night, run for and by 
students. O'Connell House is truely one of Boston College's 
"best kept secrets," providing entertainment, education, and 
camaraderie for the entire community. 

- Megan K. Jones 



147 



The Place to PIang 



Cleveland Circle 



Whether its to see the latest movie, rent from Blockbuster, 
get a bite to eat, make a late-night run to 7- 1 1 or hang out with 
your friends at a bar Cleveland Circle is the place to be. Its 
accessibility by foot, car or BC bus makes it convenient and 
anytime day or night it is crowded with BC students. 

Located around the Reservoir, Cleveland Circle is a popular 
dining spot. From Chef Choys to Presto pizza, from Roggies to 
Citysides to Ground Round there is something for everyone. 
The weekends usually bring with them waits . 

The bars, due to their proximity to campus, are BC 
hangouts. Maryannes dollar draft Wednesdays are packed wall 
to wall and a line always forms outside the door. Cityside's ten 
-cent wing nights make it a great place to relax and watch the 
game on television. Food and fun are mixed together at both the 
Ground Round and Roggies. 

The C and D line T-stops are located in Cleveland Circle 
and bring you to the excitement of downtown Boston. The 
sports fields are crowded with students playing a pickup game of 
tag football, soccer, and baseball. Cleveland Circle has it all. A 
movie theater, CVS, a hardware store, Dunkin Donuts and 
more. It is a BC treasure and students are lucky to have so much 
so close to them. 

-Samantha Steel 




k^L^ips.'--^ 



148 The Circle 





The Circle 149 



Parrying in rhe Mods, rhese girls 
celebrare anorher foorball Saturday. 

Three girls all dressed up and ready 
for a great night. 

These BC guys are trying to show 
that they know how to have a good 
time. 




150 Party 




fisggggBssm 



LetsParty 



It's Friday night and the music is blasting, people are 
screaming to be heard, and bodies are crammed against the walls. 
Yes, it is time to party! College life is more than books and classes. 
It is a time to explore your social side and expand to meet new 
people and create lasting memories. Parties are a major part of 
undergraduate life at Boston College. 

BC students know how to have a good time. Whether it is 
a one hundred people or ten close friends, the students like to 
forget the stress of the week once Friday hits the Fieights. 
Freshman year is spent wandering through the Mods hoping to 
find an open door or walking up and down Comm. Ave listening 
for music and following the mass of students heading into 
apartment buildings. By the time junior year rolls around it is 
time to begin hosting the parties and seniors are expected to party 
all the time. 

Most on-campus parties are held in the Mods, where the 
first few weeks of school and through out the spring the parties 
travel outdoors into the courtyards. Hillsides are home to theme 
parties and social events. Seniors can registrar parties through 
University Housing. From tailgates to late-night parties campus 
is always going strong all weekend long. 

Junior year, for most students, is spent living off-campus in 
apartments on Comm. Ave., in Cleveland Circle, or throughout 
the Brighton area. The first taste of complete freedom usually 
brings with it a desire to party and show off your new home to 
friends. As people begin to turn twenty-one, birthday parties 
become a weekend ritual. 

From Seventies parties to Beach parties, from huge parties 
to dinner parties, Boston College is a school with the right mix 
of academics and social life. Friends, food, music, drinks, and 
fun make for nights to remember. 

-Samantha Steel 



Parn^ 1 ' 



Tailgating 



The crisp fall air, the smell of a barbecue and the sight of 
thousands of students, fans, and alumni on scattered around lower 
campus is the picture of a football Saturday on the Heights. 
Tailgating is a weekend ritual at Boston College and campus 
becomes a sea of gold and maroon. From the Mods to the parking 
garages tailgating is as much a part of football as the game inside 
Alumni Stadium. 

Come rain or shine, the tailgating continues. Many students 
opt to continue the party well into the first or second quarters. The 
end of the game does not signal the end of the celebration. Win or 
lose the hamburgers, chips, and drinks keep on going. Shea Field 
is open for two hours after the conclusion of the game and no one 
leaves until the last moment. 

For most students, the place to tailgate is the Mods. Seniors 
do it up for their last season of Boston College football. Barbecues, 
volleyball games, friends and fun are a constant sight. In good 
weather the courtyards are packed and when it rains the festivities 
are either moved indoors or tarps are hung over the patios. The day 
begins early in the Mods and continues late into the night. 

Tailgating unifies the school and is an expression of BC spirit. 
The tailgating tradition will live on in each student and alumni of 
Boston College. 



-Samantha Steel 



152 Tailgating 





Tailgaring 153 





After a complete renovation, 
Carney's opened at the beiginning 
of the year with a new look and a 
new attitude. 

A section of the dining hall is 
restricted for grad student use only 
to provide them with a quite place 
to relax and study. 

The bookstore in the McElroy 
lobby is always crowded with both 
students and campus visitors. 



154 





HUM 



TheNew McElrcr^ 



The construction crew was busy last summer making 
improvements on EC's students center McElroy Commons. 
What was once the McElroy Dining hall was transformed into 
a unique dining experience. It opened in the fall with a new 
name, Carney's, and a new look. The dark wood paneling and 
large open spaces were replace with tents and food stations to 
create a modern atmosphere. 

The Club, which was located on the lower level of 
O'Connell House on Upper campus had once been the late- 
night food stop for hungry underclassmen. This year the Club's 
doors were closed and Carney's began to serve a late-night menu 
during the week and on weekends. Students could be found 
eating a socializing around the table at all hours of the day and 
night. 

The one item which remained the same was the friendly 
McElroy dining employees. With all the changes taking place it 
was nice to see familiar smiling faces. From the food preparation 
to the cash registers, the employees are what make the dining hall 
experience enjoyable. 

From the bookstore to the new Carney's dining hall, 
McElroy is the center of EC's busy campus. It is where people go 
to see friends and be seen by others. 









-Samantha Steel 

























































































































ING OFF-CAMPUS 



Road Trips 



Weekend Warriors! Hop in a car, on the train or bus and 
the outside world surrounding Boston is open to you. Students 
often take the opportunity to hit the road. Follow the basketball, 
football, and hockey teams to away games and BC fans will be 
there. No matter where they are headed, students take advantage 
of where they are and how close they are to so much. 

Traveling north, Vermont and New Hampshire are a 
skiing winter wonderland. The BC Ski Club sponsors group 
trips to the local mountains. The Maine beaches are a hit during 
the spring and who can resist a trip to the numerous outlets just 
over the border. Montreal is a stop many students make during 
their BC years. From museums to sporting events, and not to 
mention an 18+ drinking age, Montreal has something for 
everyone. 

Traveling south, the Connecticut casinos are a popular 
travel destination for seniors hoping to tr}' out the luck. Both 
New York City and Washington, D.C. are easy to get to by bus 
or train. Sight-seeing in each city is worth the few hours of 
traveling time. Not all trips involve big cities. Students will spend 
the weekend visiting friends at other colleges or at their roommates 
homes. 

From the Cape to Newport, from New York to Canada, 
Boston College is in the heart of the east and the four years 
students spend at school is a time for them to explore all that 
surrounds them. 



-Samantha Steel 



1 56 Road Trips 





Road Trips 1 57 




HelpingHands 



One of the most impottant jobs on the Boston College 
campus belongs to the Resident Assistants. 

The Resident Assistant position at Boston College is one 
which requires the abihty to multi-task, combine numerous 
skills, and be creative. A successful RA candidate commits 
himself/herself to serving the students and the University in the 
Residence Halls. 

The time commitment required of an RA is very 
substantial, as are the demands on the RA. In addition to a 
regular class schedule, they must be available for evening, 
weekend and vacation duty hours. Their doors are always 
open to their residents for anything from advice on classes to 
take to peer counseling. As part of their job, RAs must plan 
monthly cultural, educational, religious, athletic and social 
programs for the residents to partake in. Examples include. 
Alcohol Awareness meeting, Career Programs, Hall dinners or 
game nights. The programs are a chance to bring the residents 
together as a group to socialize and interact. 

There are many benefits to being a member of the Resident 
Staff. In addition to substantial financial aspects, the far more 
important benefits are in the area of growth and development. 
Annually, Staff are trained in developmental and leadership 
skills workshops. Members of previous Staffs have noted that 
their self-confidence has grown as a result of interacting with 
faculty, administrators and fellow students. 

In speaking with former RAs the most satisfying aspect of 
the position was their opportunity to be effective change agents 
within the University. They accomplished this by presenting 
the view of their student peers to the faculty and administrators 
with who they interact. 

There are many demands made on RAs and the hardest 
and greatest of these comes from within the individuals 
themselves. Successful RAs recognize that as much as they 
want to be involved in a variety of activities, they must restrict 
themselves to being RAs, students and developing young men 
and women . 

- From the University Housing Office 




The Jesuit priests are a valuable 
influence both at the campus 
masses and daily BC life. 




A Jesuit Tradition 



Boston College has an aura surrounding its campus. It is 
a feeling and an attitude which belongs to the Jesuit tradition . Being 
a Jesuit college carries with it a commitment to j usitice, spirituality, 
education and service to the community. 

Boston College is home to the largest collective Jesuit 
population in the country. The Jesuit influence makes BC a 
unique college experience. Whether it be teaching in the 
classroom, living in the dorms, preaching at daily or Sunday 
mass, or serving the local community through the Chaiplancy, 
the Jesuit priest are a visable part of students lives and development. 

The Jesuit ideal of commitment and service is an important 
aspect of Boston College. Through the University Chaiplancy, 
students can volunteer to travel to countries, such as Belize, 
Mexico, or Jamaica to work with those less fortunate. Closer to 
home volunteer opportunities include the PULSE program and 
volunteer position on campus. Salt & Light, Liturgy groups and 
other service groups provide another outlet for students to 
participate in. 

The Jesuit traditions and ideals are imbodied in the school 
and its students. It provides a college experience unlike any other 
where students can grow both academically and spiritually 
during their four years at BC. 



-Samantha Steel 



When living off-campus, these girls 
got into the holiday spirit with a 
tree of their own. 

St. Patrick's Day in Boston is a day 
to be green and be proud. 

Halloween calls for costumes, 
parties, and trick-or-treating in the 
Mods. 



162 Holidays 





, Happy Holidays 



Holidays 



Holidays are always a time to look forward to. Some people 
love the spirit they evoke, some love hanging up decorations, 
some love the way a holiday can bring a smile to another's face, 
and some j ust love the b reak from class . Whatever reason is given 
for celebrating, Boston College students take part in a variety of 
traditions, festivities, and charities when each holiday rolls 
around. 

This year students were treated to a long Labor Day weekend 
after the first week of classes. Most took the opportunity to settle 
into new rooms or apartments while reuniting with old friends. 
As new students got their first taste of college life and residents 
off^ campus moved in and out among heaps of broken or old 
belongings, many seniors had barbecues to kick off their last year 
at BC. As Halloween rolled around black and orange could be 
seen among the Fall colors on campus. Students made and 
participated in haunted houses for children in the area along 
with taking groups trick-or-treating in the Mods, residence halls, 
or surrounding neighborhoods. Both Friday and Saturday nights 
were filled with costume parties where everything from Bill and 
Monica to Jesus to Vanilla Ice to a shark caught in kelp could be 
seen. 

Thanksgiving never seems to come soon enough for most; 
many students look forward to the break to visit friends and 
family nearby or across the country. For the holiday season 
students balance work with organizing food and toy drives and 
sharing time with needy families and those less fortunate. They 
also find time to decorate with lights, tress, tinsel, and stockings 
among other things. Traditional events such as the Copley 
Square and O'Neill Plaza tree lighting ceremonies are well 
attended in addition to class dances held at local hotels and dance 
clubs. Many festivities, such as caroling, cocktail parties, and 
movie watching, have a red and green atmosphere to them. 

As the winter chill opens the new semester, Valentine's Day 
sneaks up to bring warmth to many hearts. Tokens of love and 
appreciation are sent and received while store sell out of flowers 
and boxes of chocolates. Whether the night is spent at a romantic 
dinner or with friends watching movies, people take the day to 
be thankful for the wonderful people in their lives. 

The first green of the semester takes the form of shamrocks on 
St. Patrick's Day. Parades and pubs in Boston are popular places 
to visit throughout the day and night. Holidays not only bring 
cheer and smiles to people, but good memories of past and 
present times. 



-Maia Misura 



Holidai.. 



Patriot's Day 



Patriot's Day is special to the Boston area because it is the 
one hohday that Boston students have off that no one else has. 
For one Monday in the middle of April the city shuts down to 
watch runners from the United States as well as around the world 
complete the 26.2 mile course through the city and surrounding 
neighborhoods. 'Marathon Monday' might be the only holiday 
where most students get up early to celebrate Boston tradition 
and the coming of warm weather. 

The earliest up are the runners who gather at Hopkinton for 
the start. Around noon, after they made it up Heartbreak Hill, 
the participants pass by BC and are greeted with cheers and 
congratulations from the students lining Commonwealth Avenue 
and Cleveland Circle. Some students spend their whole day 
along the route giving hi-fives and encouraging people that they 
are almost there. The loudest cheers are sparked by runners who 
are BC students and faculty or anyone with BC paraphernalia. 

Whether the sun comes out to shine upon the race or not, 
there is always an abundance of activity outside. Some jump in 
the race and make it to Cleveland Circle or the finish line while 
others stay around campus. Most seniors dust off their grills and 
spend the day in their backyards barbecuing, playing football, 
frisbee, or hanging out in hammocks. Parties on and off campus 
along with local bars are popular places to go after the marathon 
is over. Throughout the day students take the time to relax with 
friends and take a break from the normal daily events. As warm 
weather and community spirit are ushered in, students unwind 
and create many memorable moments. Patriot's Day brings a 
unique experience to Boston College students and had become 
a yearly awaited BC tradition. 



-Maia Misura 



164 Patriot's, Day 





The crowd gathers early in Cleveland 
Circle to have a front row seat as the 
runners make their way towards the 
finish line. 

The Monday off from school is time to 
party, watch the race, and have fun 
with friends. 

Students cheer on the participants, 
one of whom stopped to pose for a 
photo. 



Patriot's Day 165 




VYUKRUUJ IJMh 



Gettingin Shape 



Exercise is a popular pastime at Boston College. Students 
living in such a stressful environment find exercise a way to 
remain healthy while relaxing the mind and strengthening the 
body. For a few people exercise provides training for marathons, 
races, or other athletic events. For many exercise provides 
enjoyment and entertainment and is a popular way to get to 
know others or to spend time with friends. 

The most commo place to find students exercising is at Flynn 
Recreation complex, especially once the weather turns cold. The 
'P;ex' provides a wide range of activities for individuals or groups 
of people. Throughout the year basketball, racquetball, and 
volleyball games go on in the main part of the Plex with the 
sound of various aerobic classes coming from behind the end 
curtains. Those who prefer more individual workouts join one 
of the aerobic classes schedueled during the day or they head 
toward the pool for some laps. People are constantly in the track 
area playing tennis, lifting weights, or using stairmasters, 
nordictracs, bikes or rowing machines. There are a few people 
that can stand to run in circles for more than five minutes who 
use the track for running, although most run elsewhere. 

At any given time of day students can be seen running around 
Chestnut Hill Reservior. The proximity to campus and the 
variety in scenery are two main reasons why the reseervior 
attracts so many runners. Others choose to trek down 
Commonwealth Avenue towards Newton but many find 
themselves walking back to campus up 'Heartbreak Hill'. Most 
people find their own route depending on how far they like to 
run, how many hills they can ebdure, and whether or not they 
prefer the suburbs or the city. 

Students and faculty alike take advantage of the Plex and the 
surrounding are to excersise in. Even though college life can be 
filled with studying and other commitments most people manage 
to fit a workout in here and there. Some students have a regular 
schedule or time of day that they work out while others 
occasionally go when they can find time. BC students can be seen 
from dawn to dusk, as well as later into the night, working out 
individually or with friends from the first days of September to 
the last days of the Spring semester. 



-Maia Misura 



Outdoor Life 

■ ■ ■ ^ 



The sun shines down warming the face and blooming the 
flowers. Wind blows gently through the hair supplying the beat 
for the dancing trees. Soft grass tickles the bare feet. The blue sky 
provides the stage for the cloud bunnies hoping about. Not 
under any roof are these delightful moments to be found. 
Seeking the wonders of nature, many BC students took to the 
outdoors to enjoy their free time. 

Bumping over rocks and roots in the Hammond Pond 
Reservation, students liked the nearby location as a place to 
mountain bike. The rolling terrain could challenge the advanced 
rider while the sweeping curves in the flat areas povided enjoyment 
for all skill levels. With boulders and cliffs the resevation also 
served as a place to go rock climbing. Wheter partaking in 
activities, or seeking the solace of the forest, students took 
pleasure from the open air of the Hammond Park Reservation. 

Beyond the neighborhood of Boston College, mountains 
were another favorites destination for the outdoor enthusiasts. 
Red, yellow,orange, green, and brown foligae speckled the 
landscape in the fall and furnished a great excuse to go hiking or 
camping. With the onset of cold weather, outdoor thrill seekers 
zoomed down mountainsides aborad skis or snowboards. Various 
clubs sponsored camping,hiking, or skiing trips proving the 
popularity of these outdoor activities. 

Beyond the confines of four wall, endless possibilites exsisted 
for BC students. Tossing a frisbee, flying a kite, bathing in the 
sun, skipping rocks, Rollerblading, and golfing are just a few 
activities in which students participated while in the great 
outdoors. Like an eagle with talons outstretched, BC students 
grasped the spirit of the outdoors to its fullest potential. 



Trey Barlow 








Moving U] 



class of 1002 



Well, Class of 2002, you've done it. You've raised one rung 
on the ladder towards graduation and the real world. But this 
past year brought a little bit of the real world too. For some, it was 
the first time doing laundry and, for others, the first time paying 
a bill. A taste of what it is like to be a carefree college student was 
sampled through visits to the Mods or trips to Who's. At the 
same time, the stresses were felt in the form of having three 
papers due and multiple meetings on a night when all you want 
to do is sleep. For the first itme, your parents were not holding 
your hand through all of the ups and downs, but you still made 
it. You learned how to place more trust in yourselves and to make 
close friends who are willing to hel,p you through. As freshman, 
you're all in it together and that makes the bond even tighter. 

For Newton Campus freshman, the physical closeness will 
always be a memory. Bruises from the tight fit may last well into 
senior year. All freshman feel the emotional bonds whether they 
made tons of freinds or just a few close ones. It is difficult not too 
whenever you see people nearly twenty four hours a day. 

Nearly all of these hours are spent awake because freshman 
year is also a time to determine exactly how your inner clock 
ticks. Usually this means pulling a few all-nighters, although it 
is not always to study. Over breaks, people recognize you as a 
college student, not because of a newfound maturity, but your 
rather your tendancy to sleep during the day and stay out all 
night. 

Of course, freshman year does bring about a certain amount 
of maturity. Or, at least, a new perspective on some things. Issues 
brought up are dealt with because taht is what you are at school 
to do- become your own person. No longer is ther one certain 
group that runs the school and no longer are there "rules" about 
who to talk to and who to avoid- friends come together on their 
own terms. 

On your own terms you have come here, decided what to 
do while you're here and also later in life. The Class of 2002 has 
shown to be true to their morals and willing to stretch to the 
limits. Overall, freshman have spent a year having a blast and 
realizing that the best is yet to come! 

- Kristin Booher 



class of 2001 



Welcome Back! Sophomore year is marked by returning to 
school with a year at BC behind you and no longer being the 
youngest on campus. It is an inbetween period, where the future 
after college still seems distant, yet high school is fading into the 
past. 

A new year means a new location on campus. Everyone 
merges together on Lower campus after living on both Upper 
and Newton as freshman. Home is no longer a double or triple 
but eight and four-man suites in Walsh, Vaderslice or 90 St. 
Thomas Moore. Common no longer refers to the bathroom 
down the hall but the common room you share with your 
roommates. Late-nights at the Club become late-nights at 
Addies and keys are replaced with door-codes. 

Lower campus is not the only home to BC sophomores. 
This year almost all of College Road, located next to McElroy, 
housed a large number of students. It may not be Lower, but 
College Road is a fun and unique place to live allowing students 
to continue to meet new people and broaden their social circles. 

Friendships made during freshman year are solidfied. BC 
begins to feel more like home and campus is familiar. Sophmore 
years is a transitional time where school is a place you know and 
love. The future may be ahead but sophomores still have time to 
have fun and not stress about what is to come. 






-Samantha Steel 








1 % 




Lower campus is no longer a place to 
visit for a good meal but home. 

Ninety is home to many eight-man 
suites where Sophomores can chose 
to live if they have a high lottery 
number. 

Walsh Hall is the rowdy spot where 
four and eight-man suites replace to 
small rooms of freshman year. 




Sutherland is a popular area to live 
off-campus due to its location near 
both the T and the BC bus stops 
and Cleveland Circle. 

Junior year marks the moment 
when most students have to live in 
the real world of rent, bills, and 
landlords. 

Transportation is suddenly 
necessary when one has to get to 
and from school and the BC bus 
stops are usually packed with 
students waiting to catch a ride to 
campus. 








class cf 2000 

Top Ten Signs You Are A BC Junior 

1 . No RA's checking your every move 

2. Friends are leaving for semesters abroad 

3. The BC bus and the T are vital forms of trans- 
portation 

4. You and your friends are finally 21 ! 

5. You live in a world of landlords and bills 

6. Phone numbers are no longer only 5-digits 

7. You have to carry your laundry to the laundry 
mat down the street 

8. Parties, Parties, Parties!! 

9. You can legally go to any bar 

10. You still have one more incredible year at BC! 




class of 1999 



It seems like only yesterday when we arrived at Boston 
College not knowing anyone and thinking we knew it all. 
Remember how everyone would leave their doors open and just 
wander into each other's room? Remember surviving McElroy 
cuisine on a daily basis? I never knew that chicken could be 
prepared in so many ways! Who would have guessed that Papa 
Ginos could be your savior. Remember what a treat it was to walk 
down to Lower to enjoy some "real" food? Remember the first 
week of classes? Of course you couldn't walk around with a map 
because everyone would knowyou were a freshman, even though 
you totally stood out. No problem. Doug Flutie Likes Girls. 
Which building was Devlin and which way did the code go? 
And, what about Campion. Nobody seemed to have a clue where 
it was or if it really existed. Remember wandering down Comm. 
Ave. looking for a party? Remember when you met your best 
friend? 

Freshman year definitely held a lot of great memories, but 
at the same time it is a relief to be a senior. Just think, we no 
longer have to worry about our weekend plans but now it is time 
to contemplate our future. It is also a time to appreciate how 
great it is to be a college student, despite the difficulty of trying 
to juggle job interviews, homework, and fiin. 

No matter where life leads each one of us, we will never 
forget our memories at Boston College and never lose touch with 
the friends we have made. We will cherish the little things like 
late night runs to the Club as freshman, going on stress walks, 
tailgating, football games, Marathon Monday, late night slumber 
parties, and fighting for Middle March tickets. We will never 
forget the good times or all the tears shed as we experienced 
certain events for the last time as a Boston College Senior, 
especially our last home Notre Dame football game. We will 
never forget all the amazing individuals that we have met and the 
impact they have had on our lives. As sad as it is to graduate, it 
is also exciting to begin a new chapter in life. Just think how great 
it will feel to come back to Alumni Stadium for the first time as 
alumni. Best of luck to everyone as we move our separate ways. 



Sara Wierzbicki 






1999 177 



Buddled up students trek through 
the Dustbowl trying to make it to 
class. 



Snow doesn't stop school from 
continuing on schedule so students 
have to get up and go! 



Blanketed in snow, the campus is a 
beautiful serene atmosphere to look 
at and admire. 



178 Snow 




^^> ^ 



It's SNOW time! 







Sometime in November, once all the home football games are over and 
the leaves have fallen from the trees, white flakes fall from the sky and mark 
the changing of Fall into Winter. Campus is no longer green and full of life 
but, rather gray and slushy. People dig into their closets to find old boots and 
winter coats to wear to class. Although most students dread the absence of 
warmth and sun many welcome the change and the enjoyment that comes 
with snow. 

The first snowfall is always exciting and somehow allows our inner child 
to be set free. Memories of youth come back to life as people frolic about in 
layers of fleece and gortex. School work is entirely forgotten as students take 
a personal snow day; or at least a few snow hours. Snow angels are made and 
names and words are written into the snowy earth. The whiteness of Winter 
is welcomed to BC as students step outside and look toward the sky to watch 
the snowflakes sprinkle down. 

The larger quantity of snow that piles on the ground leads to more options 
for fun. Snowball fights are good for any amount of snow and are common 
between friends. Sledding is popular and students become very creative 
when it comes to sleds. Dining hall trays are often used, but occasionally you 
can see cookie sheets and various shelving unit pieces. Some try their luck on 
the hills by Upper Campus or Newton Campus while others find their own 
spot in the surrounding area. Creativity also enters into the fun when there 
is enough snow to build snowmen or snow creatures. Students have been 
known to make anything from snow castles to the BC eagle to giant coffee 
mugs in front of their dorms or at places such as the Dustbowl or Bapst lawn 
on campus. 

Winter snow not only brings fun to campus; it gives students an excuse 
to escape to the mountains of Vermont or New Hampshire for a ski or snow 
boarding weekend. The ski club day trips are popular on the weekends and 
the week-long trips over Christmas and Spring breaks usually take numerous 
students to common New England resorts hke Killington or to more distant 
ones such as Copper Mountain in Colorado or Jackson Hole in Wyoming. 
And strange as it may seem to some, while most students are relaxing on the 
beach in the sun over Spring Break, many BC students are on the slopes 
enjoying the white snowy ground. 

Snow can become troublesome at times, especially when you need to get 
to class in a hurry or it slows down travel to and from school. A lot of times 
it is irritating because the salt gets all over your shoes and because large piles 
around campus form into glacier-type formations and do not melt until 
April. If you look past these minor details, snow becomes a treasure that is 
full of possibilities. It lets your creative spirit run wild. More importantly 
though, the amusement and stress diversion that snowfall can produce will 
always keep your inner child happy. 

- Maia Misura 



Snow 1 79 



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o be an athlete, 
means to be a public model of 
all BC stands for; excellence, 
determination and integrity. It 
is through the sports programs 
that one can realize their dreams 
or vocalize their school spirit. 
Whether you are high-fiving on 
the field or cheering in the 
stands, athletics will touch your 
life at BC. From diving to track 
and from football to hockey, all 
year long the cheering crowds 
can be heard echoing across the 
Heights. 



Sports 




Making a leap towards victory. 

The BC football team gave 100 percent 
each game, fighting to win, and give their 
fans something to cheer about. 

For Boston, For Boston! 

Both players and fans alike celebrate after a 
touchdown, with high fives and shaking 
pom poms. 

The Battle of the Irish. 

The BC vs. ND rivalry left the Heights under a 
pile of wonder and disbelief that a yard could 
be the difference between a win and a lose. 

A Cloud in BC Heaven. 

Running back Mike Cloud gave BC something 
to talk about after running for 1,726 yards 
during the season and being choosen as a First- 
Team Ail-American. 





Inches From Heaven 



by Mark J. Cautela 



Just like that, it was over. 
Boston College's 35-10 loss 
to West Virginia ended not only 
the 1998 season, but the careers 
of many valuable players as 
well. 

Head Coach Tom O'Brien 
said of the senior class follow- 
ing the game, "We couldn't be 
where we are today with their 
efforts. The program is much 
more solid than it was." 

Tailback Mike Cloud's 
record-breaking BC career came 
to a close - 3,526 yards after it 
began. In addition, he racked 
up 1,726 yards on the year, not 
far short of his preseason goal 
of 2,000 yards. Quarterback 
Scott Mutryn, who, like Cloud, 
is a fifth-year senior, also saw 
the end of his days wearing ma- 
roon and gold. 

Late in the game. Cloud and 
Mutryn were seen sitting on 
the bench next to each other. "I 
saw the bad times and the good 
times. We just sat and reflected 
on things," Cloud said. 

Sixth-year linebacker and 
Co-Captain Brian Maye also 
had to endure the last game of 
his college career. "It's tough. 
That's the end of my career at 
BC, a long one at that. I'll miss 
everything about it, especially 
the guys on the team," Maye 
said. 

Two other valuable seniors 
include wide receiver Anthony 
DiCosmo and guard Doug 
Brzezinski. BC fans will surely 
miss DiCosmo's acrobatic 
catches. The team will also have 
to overcome .the loss of 
Brzezinski, whose run block- 
ing skills and leadership were 
significant this year. 



Cloud and Brzezinski have 
lined up spots in the Blue- 
Gray game (Maye is trying to 
do the same) as well as the 
Senior Bowl, both senior all- 
star games. 

Although the Eagles will 
have to make up for these key 
losses, next year's team looks 
promising in several respects. 
First of all, this year's back- 
ups will have a shot to make 
their mark in the 1999 season. 
At quarterback, there should 
be a heated battle for the start- 
ing job. BC is blessed with 
two very talented potential 
starters - sophomore Tim 
Hasselbeck and freshman 
Brian St. Pierre. Spring prac- 
tice should tell a lot about the 
future of this position. 

The largest shoes to fill will 
be at runningback, where 
Cloud departs. The most 
likely candidate to become the 
featured back is sophomore 
Cedric Washington, who was 
impressive in limited action 
this season. The deep, Damien 
Woody-led offensive line 
should be strong, despite the 
losses of Brzezinski and guard 
Dan Collins. Freshman wide 
receiver Dedrick Dewalt, who 
made tremendous strides this 
season to become an impor- 
tant cog of next season's of- 
fense. 

The defense will return 
most of its vital players, in- 
cluding linemen Chris Hovan 
and Mike Willetts and safe- 
ties Pedro Cirino and George 
White, all of whom will be 



.^t^wsi^s 





Hudled and Ready For Action. 

The connraderie and team spirit was 
evident each time the team took the field 
throughout the season. 

Fighting With All Your Might. 

Going stick to stick, the team never gave up 
and fought till the end. 

Swinging Into Action. 

In full swing, a team member illustrates the 
determination of the entire team. 

Getting Ready for the Win. 

When the season was over, the team had 
more than enough to be proud of as BC 
field hockey continues to be a bright spot 
in athletics. 



Field Hockey 





Sucking It To Them 



by Mark J. Cautela 



Another disappointing 
loss, another defeat in the 
NCAA tournament, another 
heartbreaking loss to the 
University of Connecticut 
Huskies in a game that really 
mattered ... 

The Boston College field 
hockey team's sensational 
season came to an end with an 
emotional loss to the second- 
ranked Huskies. 

After shutting out UConn 
at home during the regular 
season, the Eagles faced off 
against their Big East rivals in 
tw^o huge games within one 
week. 

The Eagles went into the 
Big East championship at 
Villanova as the number-one 
seed. After making quick 
work (3-0) of the Providence 
Friars in the first round, the 
Eagles fell to the underdog 
Huskies by a score of 2-1 . 

Sophomore Jen Hall gave 
the Eagles a 1-0 halftime lead, 
but that was all of the scoring 
her team would do. UConn 
tied the game less than two 
minutes into the second half, 
and tallied the game-winner 
on a penalty shot just minutes 
later. Big East Coach of the 
Year Sherren Granese was 
disappointed with the loss. 

"We wanted to win the Big 
East both for the regular 
season and the tournament," 
she said. "We played well in 
the first half and dominated 
our opponents, but UConn got 
the momentum in the second 
half and put some balls in the 
net." 

With the defeat, the Eagles 
lost their chance for an 
automatic bid in the NCAA 



tournament and were forced 
to sit and wait in nervous 
anticipation for an at-large bid . 

The Eagles were excited 
about the possibility of another 
showdown with their now 
bitter rivals, but they could not 
overlook their first-round 
opponent. UNH had handed 
BC their second loss of the 
season late in September but 
the Eagles soared to victory. 

The moment the Eagles 
had been waiting for finally 
arrived. After what seemed 
like ages (an entire week, in 
fact) their opportunity for 
revenge had finally come. 

UConn jumped on the 
scoreboard halfway through 
the first frame when Laura 
Klein deflected a corner hit 
past BC goalie and Big East 
Goalkeeper of the Year Jill 
Dedman. 

The Eagles kept it close 
throughout the half, but were 
put in a deep hole when 
UConn scored early in the 
second half. The gut-wrench- 
ing 3-0 loss ended an amaz- 
ing season for the Eagles. 
They earned their first 
regular-season conference 
title and posted their best 
regular season record ever. 

They were ranked sixth in 
the nation and took home 
numerous individual awards. 
Besides those previously 
mentioned, sophomore 
midfielder Jen Hall was 
named to the All-Big East 
Second Team, and freshman 
Amelie Wulf was selected to 
the All-Big East Rookie 
Team, adding to quite an 
impressive list for the Eagles. 





190 Men's Soccer 




Rough and Tough 



by Mark J. Cautela 



The men's soccer team had a 
rough season, posting a 5-10-2 
record, 2-8-1 in the Big East. The 
team is only losing five players to 
graduation and will hope to improve 
on their record next season. The 
Eagles started the year off on the 
right foot with wins over Hartford 
and UMass-Lowell. The team then 
hit a rough patch where they went 
1-5-1. The last loss of this six game 
stretch as they fell to top ranked 
UConn 3-2 in overtime. 

The team then rebounded with a 
3-0 win over Pittsburg, their first in 
Big East play this season. Two games 
later goal keeper Chris Hamblin had 
nine saves to ensure the Eagles a tie 
with the Seton Hall Pirates. 
Hamblin, a sophomore, had 5 5 saves 
on the season and a 1.66 goals against 
average. He also was strong in net in 
three shutouts, all of them coming 
against Big East foes. After drowning 
the Villanova Wildcats 3-0, the team 
lost their last four games and will 



have to shore up the midfield 
position next year.. Gone will be 
seniors Keith MacDonald and 
Chris Lynch, who was tied for 
second leading scorer with five 
points. Also departing will be 
senior Danny Horan, who led the 
Eagles with two goals and two 
assists. The Eagles will look to 
underclassmen to help carry them 
in 1999. Hamblin, fellow 
sophomore Kevin Boyd( tied for 
second on the team for points) 
and freshman Chris Cleary will be 
counted on to step up their play. 
The squad will also look for the 
development of some of their 
foreign players, particularly Sjur 
Gundersen and Knut Espen Skaug. 
If they continue to improve as well 
as the rest of the young squad, the 
Eagles will be a force to be reckoned 
with in the coming years. 



Men's Soccer 191 




192 Women's Soccer 



Go For The Goal 



by Mark ]. Cautela 



The women's soccer team had 
one of their best years in recent 
memory, as they compiled a 1 2-6-3 
record, 5-3-3 in the Big East. The 
team was a very young team with 
only four seniors and 1 1 
underclassmen. The Eagles started 
off the year slowly, going 1-2-1 in 
their first four games but then really 
took off. The team won six of their 
next seven. 

Then the team hit a rough spot 
following a 0-0 tie with West 
Virginia, as they went 1-2-1 over 
the next four. Then the Eagles rallied 
to win four of their last five. The 
final game of the season resulted in 
a disappointing 2-0 loss at the hands 
of the University of Connecticut 
Huskies, one of the top ranked teams 
in the counrty. Still the Eagles fought 
hard and gave their coach a season to 
be proud of 

Memorable games for the team 
included over-time victories over 
Central Connecticut and Brown, 
another one of New England's better 
teams. The Eagles also blanked 
Syracuse 1-0 along the way and had 
their highest scoring output of the 
year with six goals against 
Providence. Leading the way for the 
Eagles was freshman Morgan Page, 



who finished the season with 16 
goals and 3 assists, for 35 points. 
She was named second team All- 
Big East and to the Big East All- 
Freshman team. Sophomore Sarah 
Powell, one of the conference's 
best on defence, joined her on the 
All-Big East second team. 

Sophomore goalie Courtney 
Schaeffer started all 21 games in 
net for the Eagles and made 106 
saves for the year. She also had a 
stellar 1.01 goals against average 
to go along with seven shutouts. 

The squad barely missed 
making the NCAA tournament, 
as teams they beat (i.e. Syracuse) 
made it in before them. The Eagles 
will only use that as motivation for 
next season, when they look to 
improve on their already 
impressive mark. Returning for 
the Eagles will be key players at 
virtually every position, with 
Guarino, Page, Schaeffer and 
Powell all coming back. 

The team does lose Captains 
Leigh Cofran and Kiera McKeon 
to graduation, but the team will 
hope to make up for their absence 
by having the underclassmen step 
up to their place. 



Women's Soccer 193 



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198 Sailing 



In The Wind 




BC Sailing is one of the 33 Varsity sports at 
Boston College. Looking around the school, one 
might wonder where does the sailing team practice 
and house the team's numerous boats? The team 
facilities are located at the Savin Hill Yacht Club in 
South, Boston. The school owns 18 new Vanguard 
420s and 6 Vanguard FJs. The dinghy team practices 
four days a week and competes in over 75 
intercollegiate events per season at colleges and 
universities around the country. The large schedule 
ensures that everyone on the team gets an opportunity 
to compete in regattas. 



Sailing 199 




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Making a Splash 



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Water Polo 201 




202 Volleyball 




Block It 



i t- 




The Boston College Volleyball 
team completed a very successful 
spring season this year. The team 
went head-to-head against the best 
teams in New England. At the first 
tournament of the season included 
the University of Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island and New Hampshire. 
Lead by Coach Hadel the team 
looked to learn as well as improve 
with each match they played. 

"I intentionally invited those 
teams so that we could see where we 
are as a program by playing against 
solid competition," said Hadel. The 
team was without star setter Kyleen 
Charlton for the first two matches 
of the year, as she recovered from 
wrist surgery. According to the 
team and Coach Hadel, Charlton is 
one of the best setters in the BIG 
EAST and she leads the team with 
her outstanding performances. 

Throughout the season, the 
women made strives to improve both 
their personal game and the teams 
overall performance on the court. 



Junior Kristin Sprinkel, who in 
her first time as role setter in her 
BC career, led the Eagles to a 
victory over Wellesley. 

"I am most impressed with 
Kristen Sprinkle, who never set in 
a match before this tournament: 
to do as well as she did," according 
to Hadel. Amy Chiaverini's play 
this season and strives to better 
her game gave her the title as most 
improved on the team. With hard 
work, determination, andastrong 
off-season workout program, the 
team will be back in action next 
fall. 

The team also added a new 
member to their coaching staff, 
when Sean McMorrow was hired 
as the new assistant coach. 
McMorrow has been coaching 
volleyball for fifteen years and is 
expected to help the team on the 
court and off, by using his 
involvement in the Boston 
community to build a larger 
fanbase. 



Volleyball 203 



204 Men's Tennis 




Nice Shot, Love 



Fall Season Team Results 



U.S. Military Invitational 

Boston University 

New Hampshire 

Massachusetts 

Connecticut 

Fairfield 

Uconn Invitational 



No Team Scores 

5-1 
7-0 
4-2 
2-4 
6-0 

No Team Scores 



Rolex Eastern Regional Championship No Team Scores 







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Men's Tennis 205 




206 Women's Tennis 




Swingin' 




Women's Tennis Fall Schedule 

Providence 7-1 (W) 

William & Mary Invitational 

Yale 6-3(L) 

Penn 

Brown 5-4(W) 

Boston University 5-4(L) 

Brown Invitational 

ITA/ECAC 

ITA All American 

ITA Individual 

ITA Individual 

Harvard /Princeton Invitational 

Boston University 

UC Santa Barbara 5-1 (W) 








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Women's Tennis 207 






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Boston College Wrestling 1998-99 Final Results 

(5-14, 1-6 ECWA) 

11/14 Binghamton Open No Team Scores 

11 /22 Columbia Tournament 

vs. Columbia 3-43 

vs. Davidson 22-18 

vs. Wagner*^ 1 6-31 

11 /28 Kutztown Tournament 34.5 (I2th of 14 teams) 

12/5 U.S. Coast Guard Tourney 65 (4th of 8 teams) 

12/20 Wilkes Duals No Team Scores 

1/17 Binghamton Duals 

vs. Brockport 21-31 

vs. Bringhamton 7-29 

1/10 Feldmeier Big Eastern Duals 

12-26 
19-29 
13-26 



vs. Seton Hall 
vs. Rutgers 
vs. Syracuse 

1/17 Quad-Meet 
vs. DrexaP 
vs. Seton Hall* 
vs. Bucknell* 



6-49 
9-34 
15-34 



1 /30 Franklin and Marshall Duals 
vs. Franklin and Marshall 29-17 
vs. Wilkes 18-30 

2/7 Wagner Duals 

vs. Wagner'^ 37-11 

vs. Sacred Heart 37-6 

2/13 Harvard Duals 

vs. Harvard 9-30 

vs. Cornell 6-47 

2/19 Boston University Duals 

vs. Boston University'^ 11-30 
vs. Sacred Heart 37-6 

3/7 ECWA Championships 20.5 (7th of 8 teams) 

'^ECWA Match 




218 Men's Feiicin 



A Winning Legacy 



by Mark J. Cautela 




This year's Men's Varsity Fencing 
team is the proud inheritor of a 
winning legacy. All season, they have 
worked to continue the tradition 
that won Head Coach Syd Fadner's 
team four consecutive New England 
Championships. Each year, the team 
committed itself to work harder and 
to gain greater national recognition. 
The men took these goals into 
competition against regional rivals 
MIT, Brown, and Brandeis, and 
against national power-houses Penn 
State and St. John's. 

This year's team was led by co- 
captains Sean Sinclair and Luke 
Mountain, both of whom, along 
with junior Brian Johnson, earned 
impressive records on the sabre 
squad. The epee squad was led by 
the performance of sohomores Zakee 
Filoward and Bobby Kim and senior 
Steve Marantette. The foil squad 
put forth another dominating season 
with juniors Rob Cutler and Brian 
Von Kraus and sophomore Greg 
Shea. 



The fencing team began its 
impressive season at this year's 
Temple University Open, where 
junior Luke Mountain flattened 
the competition to capture the 
gold medal. At the New England 
Invitational, sophomore Bobby 
Kim was a finalist in the epee 
competition. 

The Varsity Fencers hope to 
continue their winning ways at 
this year's New England 
Championship at BC. The greatest 
test for the team will be at the 
Intercollegiate Fencing 

Championship, the oldest and 
most prestigios invitational in the 
country, where the team will face 
the tops squads in the country. 

Of this season, senior Steve 
Marantette said, "The key to our 
success was having respect for every 



comp 
one t 


etitor and taking each bout 
ouch at a time." 































































































































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220 Women's Fencing 




A New Level 



by Mark J. Cautela 



The Women's Varsity Fencing 
Team returned this year with the 
heart of the hne-up that earned them 
their first New England 
Championship. Under the direction 
of Head Coach Syd Fadner, the 
women were determined to continue 
their domination of the conference. 

This year's team is led by senior 
co-captains Leah Larsen and Joy 
Chambers. Larsen, along with junior 
Holly Russell, sophomore Michelle 
Guevara, and freshman Ellen Coates, 
had an impressive season of foil 
competition. Chambers led the epee 
squad that included sophomores 
Regina Lennox and Estelle Chow, 
and freshman Robyn Janank. This 
year also saw the long-overdue 
establishment of women!s sabre 
competition in the NCAA. The first 
BC women's sabre squad was 
proudly composed of freshmen 
CeCe Boudreau, Meagan Kenny, 
Becky King, and Amanda Silvia. 



The women have secured an 
impressive record this season, 
defeating regional rivals like MIT 
and Brown. At the New England 
Invitational, epees Estelle Chow 
and Regina Lennox captured 
second and third respectively. 
Foilist Michelle Guevara finished 
fourth, and freshman sabreist 
Amanda Silvia finished fourth in 
the first ever New England 
Women's Sabre final. 

The women have the potential 
to not only win a second 
consecutive New England 
Championship, but also to finish 
with the best record in team 
history. 

"We are proud of all that we 
have accomplished this year. This 
team has defmately risen to a new 
level," said senior Leah Larsen. 



Women's Fencing 221 




Leading the student section and raising 
school spirit makes the cheerleaders an 
important part of the game day 
experience. 

All smiles, the men of the squad raise the 
women and the spirit to new levels. 

The pep rallies, held outside of Lower Dining 
brought together the student body and the 
footbal team for a pre-game celebration. 

Coordination, balance and strength make BC 
cheerleading a sight to see. 



222 Cheerleading 






Let's Go BC! 
Let's Go ! 



Needed: A student who can 
perform back-flips, stand on one 
foot while balancing on a hand in 
midair and flip to the ground all 
while smiling. Sound unbeUeveable? 
Well, what is wanted is a BC 
Cheerleader. Each Saturday in the 
fall and numerous nights each week 
in the winter, the cheerleaders 
perform outrageous stunts and 
pyramids all for the BC fans. 

This football season, there was 
never a moment when the student 
section was not alive with spirit and 
pom-poms weren't constantly 
shaking. It was the efforts of the 
cheerleaders that made the crowd 
ready to cheer! From the pep rallies 
to the end of the fourth quarter, 
these guys and girls are on their feet 
giving it their all. 

The squad has a practice schedule 
comparable to other varisity sports. 
It takes hours to perfect each stunt, 
flip, cheer, and dance. And the final 
product is perfection. Hardwork and 
dedication is a must to handle the 
demands of the team. 



During time-outs at basketball 
games, all eyes are on center court 
and the cheerleaders never 
disappoint. The BC flag flying 
around the court always gets people 
to their feet cheering. From 
cheering on the sidelines to 
dancing on the floor, they work 
hard all night long. 

The cheerleaders are here for 
the students and the teams at BC. 
They are the spirit leaders. Each 
member of the team has strength, 
determination, dedication, 
personality, and school spirit. 
From the BC chants to the 
touchdown push-ups, they are 
behind the teams and leading the 
students through it all. 



Chcerleading 



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226 Men's Basketba! 




Taking Aim 



by Brian Barrio 



Observers of the BC men's 
basketball team knew 1999 would 
be a long season for their squad even 
before the Big East coaches made 
the Eagles the overwhelming 
preseason pick for last place in 
October. 

After 6' 10 senior center and All- 
Big East candidate Kostas Maglos 
unexpectedly returned to his native 
Greece overthe summer, head coach 
Al Skinner entered the season with 
only three players on his roster who 
saw considerable playing time in 
'97-'98. Maglos' defection left 
former waLk-on Dwayne Pina, a 5'7 
point guard, sophomore shooting 
guard Kenny Harley, and 
sophomore forward Jon Beerbohm 
as the lone noteworthy returnees 
from 1998's 15-16 squad. Along 
with these three. Skinner had only 
five untested freshmen, three walk- 
ons, and a junior transfer with which 
to do battle in the rough-and-tumble 
Big East conference. 

Many BC fans feared the worst, 
envisioning 30-point blowouts in 
every league contest, and possibly a 
repeat of the Unversit)' of Miami's 
dubious 0-18 Big East record in 
1994. 

What nobody could have 
predicted before the season, though, 
was how the unheralded freshman 
class would rise to the challenge 
presented them. Led by the high- 
scoring and high-rising Kenny 
Walls, the young Eagles made 
themselves a legitimate threat to 
every team in the league. Although 
their record was mediocre, their 
effort was anything but. BC even 
put a scare into Big East frontrunner 
andnumber-one-ranked 
Connecticut in January, finally . 



bowing to the Huskies by the 
score of 91-78. Close games at 
Miami and Villanova and at home 
against Providence and 12th 
ranked St. John's were finally 
followed by the elusive first 
conference win, at Conte Forum 
over Notre Dame and freshman 
sensation Troy Murphy 

Junior transfer Michael Cotton 
provided steady leadership and 
scoring punch all year long, 
including a 23-point, 12 rebound 
outing against Uconn. Pina again 
handled the point effectively, even 
scoring 17 points against Miami 
in January. Harleywas a defensive 
stalwart and scored consistently, 
while Beerbohm provided a spark 
off the bench in the frontcourt. 
6'7 freshman Brian Ross, 
undersized at center, battled 
admirably against what was often 
a 5-inch height advantage and 
helped the Eagles on the boards. 
Fellow freshmen Willie Deane and 
Clinton Sims also played big 
minutes for BC, and of course, 
Walls provided the exclamation 
points on offense, assuming '98 
grad Antonio Granger's crown as 
the Eagles' chief slam-dunk artist. 

With a solid incoming 
recruiting class and a roster 
featuring no seniors and only one 
junior gaining experience by the 
game, expectations are growing, 
and the new millenium should 
mark a new dawn for BC hoops. 



Men's Basketball 11 



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230 Women's Basketba 




Shooting To Win 



by Brian Barrio 



1999 was a banner year for BC 
women's basketball. First came the 
arrival on campus of much-heralded 
freshman guard Brianne Stepherson, 
who originally committed to 
national powerhouse Connecticut 
but later opted to stay close to home 
and attend Boston College. Coach 
Cathy Inglese was more than happy 
to have Brianne become an Eagle, as 
well as to deprive league rival Uconn 
of yet another All-American. 

Even before Stepherson's 
decision, things were looking up for 
the BC women. All-Big East 
sophomore point guard Cal 
Bouchard was back, as was three- 
point gunner Alissa Murphy and 
senior post players Paula Bacso and 
Whitney Steele. But the arrival of 
Brianne, along with fellow freshman 
Becky Gottstein had visions of EC's 
first NCAA Women's tourney berth 
floating in Inglese's head, as it seemed 
the team finally wouldhave the depth 
to join Connecticut, Rutgers, and 
Notre Dame among the league's 
elite. 

BC made their first ever 
appearance in the Top 25 in January, 
but lost Bouchard soon thereafter. 
Coupled with a season-ending injury 
to 6'4 senior Allie Booth and 
Stepherson's two-week absence 



courtesy of the flu, Bouchard's 
loss depleted the Eagles' ranks, 
and they quickly bowed out of the 
polls with a loss to Syracuse. 
Coming up on the schedule was a 
date with powerful Connecticut 
at Conte Forum, and it appeared 
that the wheels were ready to come 
off of the BC bandwagon. 

Then, before the women's first 
ever sell-out crowd at Conte, the 
unthinkable happened. The Eagles, 
sans Bouchard, dispatched the 
Lady Huskies with ease, their first 
win over Uconn since 1990. Allissa 
Murphy scored 32 points in the 
upset, but everyone contributed 
in the absence of Bouchard, 
propelling BC back into the Top 
25 and keeping the dream of an 
NCAA tourney bid alive. 

The women say goodbye to 
solid core of seniors in '99, but 
these ladies can now graduate 
proudly knowing that they laid 
the foundation for a future in 
which BC is finally part of the Big 
East elite. 




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234 Men's Hockey 




Skating To Victory 





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by Mark]. Cautela 



The 1998-1999 Men's Ice 
Hockey team began their seaso n o n 
the top after being selected first in 
the HOCKEY EAST pre-season 
poll. Nineteen iettermen returned 
firom the previous years HOCKEY 
EAST Tournament Champion 
and NCAA Tournament runner- 
up team. Included in the returners 
were Ail-Americans Junior Mike 
Mottau and Sophomore Brian 
Gionta. 

This season was filled with just 
as much excitement as the previous 
year as the team was once again led 
by Head Coach Jetty York. Notre 
Dame weekend began when the 
Eagles took on the Fighting Irish 
on the ice. Before a sold-out Conte 
Forum,, the game ended in a 5-5 tie. 
The energy continued asthe Eagles 
blew-out Boston University in a 6- 
2 win. Gionta scored three goals, 
all in the second period and Mottau 
registered four assists. 

The HOCKEY EAST 
Tournament was not a let down by 
any means. The Eagles won their 




second consecutive HOCKEY 
EAST title and their fourth overall 
( 1987, 1990, 1998, 1999). Itwas 
then onto the NCAA Tournament 
where BC was sent to the Western 
Regionals in Madison, WI. The 
Eagles won both regional games, 
defeating Northern Michigan 2-1 
and North Dakota 3-1. The team 
then headed to Anaheim, CA and 
the Frozen Four Championship. 
Memories of last years 
championship game were on 
everyone's minds as BC and Maine 
went head to head in an overtime 
match-up. When the game was 
over, Maine moved onto the finals 
after they defeated BC 2-1. But 
after a great season, the team had 
nothing to be disappointed about. 
The team finished with a 27- 1 2-4 
overall record. 

Motrau and Gionta were named 
to the All-American First Team 
and Gionta was one of the ten 
finalists for the prestigious Hobey 
Baker award. 




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Women's Hockey 




238 Women's Hockey 




Queens of the Ice 



PQIIC \ > 




by Mark J. Cautela 



Lead by Head Coach Tom 
O'Malley, the Boston College 
Women's Ice Hockey team finished 
the 1 998- 1 999 season with an overall 
8-20-2 record. The team faced some 
tough losses to UNH, Harvard, and 
Northeastern but had some great 
moments and wins along the way. 

Early on in the season, the team 
defeated Mankato State 7-4 after 
losing to the same team earlier in the 
weekend. The women came out 
strong in the first period, scoring 
three goals and Nicole DeBlois 
scored the game winner for the Eagles 
in the third period. 

1999 started with a 3-3 tie to 
Yale. BC got on the board first in 
the second period on Caroline 
Miller's first goal of the season 
assisted by Amber Bobinand and 



Jane Jorge. Senior Erin Magee 
scored her team-leading eleventh 
goal of the season at 3:07 of the 
third period to give the Eagles a 
3-1 lead. Yale responded late in 
the third period, tying the game. 
Freshman Sharon Vantuyl made 
24 saves for the Eagles. 

Later in the season BC came 
back to defeat Yale 5-4 in overtime. 
Sophomore Jen Buckley set up 
Sophomore Lisa Molvar for the 
game winning goal. Junior goalie 
Christy Entwig helped keep the 
Eagles alive making 32 saves, 1 1 of 
which were in the third period. 

Other season highlights include 
two great wins over Colby and a 
9-1 win over Wesleyan. Senior 
Erin Magee added three hat tricks 
to her record. 



Women's Hockey .^■'' 




Senior Kim Curits flips into action at a BC 
home meet this year in the Plex. 

After a breathtaking effort, this BC diver 
enter the water. 

Maintaining a perfect form, the BC diver 
performs under pressure. 

Diving is a combination of skill, fearlessness, 
and form. 





Dive In 




by Kim Curtis 

( 



The BC Men's and Women's 
swim teams had a very successful 
season. They both enjoyed winning 
records this year, with victories over 
some old rivals. The team greatly 
benefitted from the help some 
extremely talented freshman, who 
broke several BC records, and 
quickly became part of the team. 
The team will miss their seniors next 
year who have led BC to key wins 
over the past four years. Christmas 
vacation was spent at the University 
of Hawaii, where the team endured 
long workouts, but also enjoyed time 
exploring the island. After training, 
it was back to competition when BC 
competed against San Louis Opsispo 
in Northern California where both 
the men and women won. The team 
completed their successful regaular 
season on a high note with a win 
over Providence and began to 
prepare for a trip to the BIG EAST 
championships. 



It was an all-around great year in 
the pool for BC as the BC diving 
team also had a successful 
season. The team included led by 
Senior captain Kim Curtis. The 
team accompanied the swimming 
teams on their training trip to 
Hawaii and benefited from the 
daily workouts and the use of the 
University of Hawaii's equipment. 
This year's team had three finalists 
in the BIG EAST tournament and 
had four qualifiers for the NCAA 
Zone Meet. Every team member 
finished their season with a 
personal best. 



Swimming 243 



»^>(»^'^ 




Playing in the Beanpot tournament 
at Fenway was a highlight of the teams 
season. 



After a successful game it is all high-fives for 
the team. 



Eric Olson makes every swing count as he 
gives it his all. 



Mike Hubbard waits to make his way around 
the bases and bring in another run for BC. 




Lauren P 


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Field of Dreams 



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by Mark J. Cautela 



The Boston College baseball team 
enters a new era this spring when 
Peter Hughes takes over as head 
coach. The team has not enjoyed a 
winning season since 1993 and 
Hughes looks forward to bringing a 
winning tradition back to the 
Heights. Last season the team went 
4-15-1 in the Big East and 1 7-23- 1 
overall. A goal for this year is to not 
only improve but make it to the 
Eagles first Big East Tournament in 
eight years. 

Eleven starters, including five 
pitchers, are returning. The Eagles 
will be depending on seniors Sean 
McGowan and Jeff Waldron and 
Junior Steve Langone. All three 
played in the 1998 New England 
All-Star Game and McGowan 
earned both ECAC Division-I First- 
Team honors and ABC All- 
Northeast First-Team honors. 

The pitchers look promising, 
with five returning, Langone, juniors 
David Conley and Andy 
Sullivan.sophomore Erik Olson, and 
senior Paul Bibbo. Also joining the 
Eagles are four newcomers, Dan 



Auerbach, Paul Knapic, Joe 
Michel, and Mark Sullivan, who 
will be sure to get some time on 
the mound. 

The Eagles will look behind 
the plate for leadership. Both team 
co-captains, Jeff Waldron and 
Sonny Nictakis, are catchers. 
Waldron was a 12th round 
selection of the St. Louis Cardinals 
in last years major league baseball 
amateur draft. 

First baseman Sean McGowan, 
who along with second baseman 
Mike Gambino started 39 out of 
EC's 41 games last spring, will 
have to step up to the plate and 
continue to lead the Eagles in 
batting average, hits, homeruns, 
and RBIs. 

The Eagles have the potential 
to returning to their days as a 
regional power. It maybe difficult, 
as they face such teams as Arizona 
State, but they have the talent and 
the leadership it requires. 




After a win, the infield gathers on the 
mound for a victory high-five. 

Cheering on the team is a vital part of each 
game for those in the dugout. 

The catcher calls the shots at homeplate. 



Anyone who thinks girls don't play dirty 
hasn't seen the BC softball team in action 



250 Softball 




Running The Bases 



by Mark J. Cautela 



The Eagles are looking to win 
their third consecutive Big East 
Softball Championship this season. 
With nine returning starters from 
last years championship team, who 
finished the season with an 
impressive 38-14-1 record, their 
goal may be attainable. Top 
returnees include, junior pitchers 
Mary Dietz and Lauren Fischetti. 
Dietz, was named Preseason Pitcher 
of the Year by the Big East after she 
set a conference record last season 
with 101 strikeouts. Fischetti led 
the league in wins with a record of 
16-5 in 29 appearances. 

Big East Rookie of the Year, Jen 
Perrotta, along with juniors Chris 
Vicari and Lauren Fische will be 
looked to for offensive leadership. 
Each were named to the Preseason 
All-Big East team. 



The outfield looks strong with 
Gretchen Thompson and juniors 
Julie Ulbrich and Cristin Brown 
owning the territory. If everyone 
plays their role to the best of their 
ability, the Eagles will be at the top 
once again. 

Head Coach Jen Finley is in 
her fourth season leading the lady 
Eagles and wants to make this her 
third straight season as coach of 
the Big East Champs and her third 
straight appearance at the NCAA's. 
With the addition of the 
bubble in Alumni Stadium, the 
team has been able to get in some 
extra practice leading up to the 
season. The Eagles get their season 
under way February 26 at the 
National Coaches Association 
Tournament where they will take 
on No. 1 Fresno State. 



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Courtscy of the Heights 



The Best OF 1998-1999 




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Mnity Si Beyond 



Editor ^ Lori Lefreve 



A 



s Seniors 



closed classes and rejections 
from bars became a thing of the 
past. Yet with this new found 
freedom came the responsibility 
of job interviews and graduate 
school applications. In-between 
resume workshops, internships, 
and writing theses, we still found 
the time to add final memories 
to our time on the Heights. We 
will always share these four years 
at Boston College. 




Seniors 



id r chose the path less traveled, and that made all the diWerence. 1 his is the poem by Kooe 




18*^ 



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^vei to Excellence 



When I came to look at Boston College as a senior in high school, I asked a couple students, "What's the best 
thing about BC?" Without fail, every student answered, "the people." I'll admit, I was doubtful. . . could the people 
at this university really be so great that they overpowered any other facet of the institution? Four years later, my 
answer is a resounding "Yes!" When we leave this school, as hard as we may try to bring with us the formulas and 
theories from our studies, it will be far easier to remember the people who have influenced the course of our lives 
here at BC. 

Such people are presented here in the Perspectives section. The seniors seen on the following pages were 
nominated by their peers for having made an impact on the university and their fellow students. They were 
nominated because their classmates felt that they exemplified BC's motto, "Ever to Excel." 

Although they differ on many levels, these 21 seniors agree that the past four years have been exciting and 
challenging. Their senior year was characterized by spending as much time as possible with their friends, yet still 
trying to find time for themselves. They have struggled to find a balance in their lives between friends, school, 
jobs, service, and fun. Unlike the students highlighted in previous years, these seniors are unified in their love of 
service. After graduation, these students will be found helping others all over the globe: in Brooklyn with the Good 
Shepherd Volunteers, in Alaska with JVC, in Micronesia with JVI, and in Boston for law school, to name a few. 
Clearly, as one senior commented, these individuals easily exemplify strength, service, and humility through their 
everyday actions. 

^Ani ^Umnxin^ and KatCe <Hatt 



Dawn Brown 



If there is one thing that some students on campiis have missed 
while attending BC it is having Dawn Brown as an RA. "If you have 
not had the chance to get to know Dawn, which is slight, you 
haven't had the full BC experience. Her trademark 'Hi, Honey' and 
her 'kill 'em with kindness' attitude exude BC values." Dawn was 
one of several RA's who spent their junior year on Newton Campus. 
She enjoyed the experience so much she returned as an SA in Walsh 
for her final year at BC. Her residents and fellow staff members 
found her to be an informative resource and an outstanding friend 
and leader. "To see her connect with a floor of freshmen and 
transform them into a real community of caring individuals was 
both amazing and heartening," one friend contributed. 

Dawn's definition of "Ever to Excel" is to never give up and to 
make an impression where ever one goes. Dawn has left her 
impression on BC with her dedication to service, seen in her 
numerous campus activities such as Day of Service, AHANA 
Leadership Council, Kids on Campus, and Voices of Imani. Dawn's 
favorite classes have been with Dr. King, a man who she felt was 
honest and open in his teaching style. Dawn Brown is a teacher in 
her own right, as a friend contributes that "she has taught me more 
about life, than she could possibly imagine. She has been as much 
a part of my education as any class I have taken." In the future. 
Dawn sees herself as a part of Teach For America after graduation, 
■' 'pes thereafter to attend graduate school and to receive her 
' ' lunseling. 



Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. 




262 



sptciivcs 



If you don't have anything nice to say, don't say 
anything at all. 



1 



Brian McDevitt 



"What doth it profit a man if he gain the whole world 

and suffer the loss of his soul? " 

-Mark 8:36- 

Brian McDevitt is one of many seniors who spent part of their junior 
year abroad. Brian's semester in Gaul way, Ireland renewed his perspec- 
tive on the world and helped him to jump full force into his senior year and 
a summer as an Orientation Leader. 

One of Brian's biggest challenges at BC has been to coordinate a life in 
his home state of Wisconsin with a busy life here in Chestnut Hill. Yet the 
challenge hasn't been unanswered—he has risen to the call and continually 
puts 100% into everything he does, striving to better himself and those 
around him every day. 

The PULSE program affected Brian his freshman year by introducing 
him to the service aspect of BC. He was intrigued by BC's unique 
combination of service and academics. He has continued to serve his 
community as a strong force on campus, using his intense energy and 
school pride to affect others through leadership in programs such as 
Orientation, 48 Hours, and Kairos. 

Brian loves everything about BC, especially the everyday contact with 
close friends and acquaintances, even those "people you see who you may 
not know too well, but they're awesome and they brighten your day!" He 
says his worst days are when he doesn't recognize that he's a part of this 
amazing institution we all sometimes take for granted. As one of Brian's 
friends says, "He puts his heart in all that he does and has a genuine care 
and concern for others in the process. Through his involvement, as well 
as his smile, he has made a difference at Boston College." 




"No one would choose to live without friends, 
even if he had all other goods. " 



Elisabeth Filarski 



-Aristotle- 



"Simply radiating eloquence" is how one fond friend de- 
xibes her, and that is just the impression one receives when 
)eaking with Elisabeth Filarski. Her patient and genuine 
laracter envelops you as she welcomes you into a world filled 
ith inspiration, kindness, generosity, and BC pride. She went 
1 the Belize Immersion trip 
jr sophomore year, was an 
rientation Leader in 1998, 
\d was asked to be a TA for 
le freshman Cornerstone 
ass. 

Elisabeth came to BC as a 
eshmen radiating talents in 
"t, Softball, and service. She 
alked on the softball team as 
freshman and worked hard 
5 a player to create a disci- 
line in which she could excel, 
eammates and coaches rec- 
gnized her leadership ability 
id asked her to be a captain 
f the team her junior year. 
Ke loved being part of a team, 
earning to make decisions not 
nly for herself, but for the 
enefit of those around her, as 
^ell. 




"Every single one of us is called to he a king, a queen, a 

hero in our ordinary lives.. . We do not build statues only 

to worship the exceptional life, we build them in order to 

remind ourselves of what is possible in our own." 

-Anonymous- 



One of Elisabeth's toughest challenges at BC was finding a 
new way to be a leader on the softball team her senior year 
when she discovered she would be unable to play actively on 
the team. This new challenge did not deter Elisabeth's spirit; 
instead, she embraced it and has succeeded, not only at softball, 

but in all aspects of her life. 
Her senior art project was high- 
lighted on numerous occa- 
sions, including the Artists for 
AIDS Benefit. She also found 
time to spend with her 
younger brother, a freshman 
here at BC who, in her words, 
"brings out the best in me!" 

Elisabeth hopes to continue 
her art in the future by work- 
ing with a design team devel- 
oping clothing. As long as she 
continues to paint, Elisabeth 
will continue her commitment 
to keeping her identity while 
still bringing out the best in 
others with her care and con- 
cern. One friend attributes to 
her, "Not only does the girl 
glow with energy, but she re- 
ally shines a light on Boston 
College." Perspectives 263 



CAROLYN BERCHOFF 




"Success is to he measured not so much by the position 

that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he 

has overcome while trying to succeed." 

~ Booker T. Washington ~ 

Scott Miniter 



Experience is not what happens to a man, it is what a 

man does with what happens to him." 

~ Aldous Huxley ~ 

Carolyn Berchoff spent her first year at BC in Greycliff, th 
only dorm that isn't quite "on campus." While every dorm i 
filled with unique individuals, Greycliff is small enough that 
student could actually meet each of the other residents durin; 
a year. And Carolyn did so, finding that her experiences ther 
taught her how to interact with a variety of personalities. She' 
learned to look past exteriors to find the person within and ha 
found that you truly can't judge a book by its cover. 

True enough for Carolyn herself. Carolyn's exuberance 
spontaneous laughter, and strength of character have helpe? 
her to face four years of challenge. Her personality, literally a 
bright as her smile, has stayed enthusiastic over years of dea 
ing with cystic fibrosis. Carolyn has learned to look past hi 
illness and to focus her attention on her schoolwork and h( 
friends. She has cherished every moment with her friends an 
this year has finally allowed herself to relax and "not 1( 
anything interfere with having fun!" 

"Ever to Excel is reaching your potential with what you'^ 
been given." Carolyn was blessed with a beautiful singir 
voice, a voice she has shared with others through the Universi 
Chorale and the Madrigals. She was a Peer Advisor to ires 
men, helping them adjust to life on the Heights. Part of h 
senior year was devoted to working on her thesis, an autobio 
raphy championed by one of her favorite professors, Micha 
Martin. A biology major, Carolyn plans to become a Physiciar ■ 
Assistant and to practice in New York after graduation. 

"Devote yourself to loving others, devote yourself 

to your community around you, and devote yourself 

to creating something that gives you purpose and meaning. ' 

~ from Tuesdays With Morrie ~ 



Scott Miniter, a member of the Boston College Lightweight Varsity Crew Team, 
has gotten up every morning since freshman year to be at the Charles River for 6am 
practices. One friend points out the irony of being on the lightweight team and 
having "a number of heavy gold medals hanging around the team's necks." The 
lightweight team has shared much success, such as being named the New England 
Champions of 1998. Scott fondly remembers bursting into the Vanderslice study 
lounge to tell his roommates the good news, disturbing the room's studious 
members who all were to happy to shared the victory with him. 

Scott has always been an exemplary student, team leader, volunteer, and friend. 
He successfully completeed the Emerging Leadership Program his freshman year 
and returned sophomore year to be the program facilitator and a freind to the 
incoming freshmen. Scott arrived at his school early his senior year, acting as the 
Student Coordinator for ELP. Scott is also active in 4Boston, serving on the council 
Ids junior and senior year. As a senior, Scott worked with the elderly in Boston 
through Little Brothers Freinds of the Elderly. As a student at BC, Scott has explored 
the extent of his potential, tried new things, and made declaratives, focused choices 
in putiing his entire self into each organizzation of which he is a part. 

Scott remembers getting together with his friends every Friday freshman year for 
hours of lunch, relaxing and enjoying "just being." Scott's favorite place on campus 
changes every year. As a junior it was the 6th floor study lounge of Vanderslice, the 
big bay window beckoning him to relax and look out over BC's campus after a snow 
fall quietly covered campus. As for a favorite place as a senior, much like most of 
us, Scott is still searching, not too eager to put his finger on just one place as he ends 
four years here, but appreciating the whole experience. 

264 Perspectives 




"The ultimate measure of a mn is not where he stands in 

moments of comfort and coenience but where he stands at 

times of challenge and controversy." 

~ Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ~ 



When asked "What does 'Ever 
rurillo did not hesitate when he 
erm is 'Ever for Excellence'." Jay 
t, "Ever for Excellence" is a never 
vhere and to make something 
setter. 

Jay has demonstrated his 
imbition to better our school 
jy consistently giving back to 
3C. He has worked to fine- 
:une UGBC by getting in- 
/olved with MLP as a coordi- 
nator sophomore year and was 
elected Chief of University Af- 
'airs his senior year. As Chief 
le has presented to the Board 
)f Trustees a plan to develop 
I new academic advising pro- 
gram so students don't slip 
hrough the cracks . He worked 
with Father Joe Marchese as 
:he Student Representative for 
:he development of the new 
Cornerstone class for fresh- 
men. Now as a senior. Jay is a 



to Excel' mean to you?". Jay 

said, "Actually, the correct 

should know. As he defines 

-ending journey to get some- 




Bridget Sherry 




Jay Turillo 



TA of one of these classes and is thrilled to see his hard work 

come to fruition. 

With Faith, Peace, and Justice as a minor. Jay traveled to 

Navajo Nation his junior year to put his education into action. 

He returned to the reservation 
as a leader of the trip his senior 
year. 

His upcoming departure 
from the Heights brings back 
fond memories of late nights 
at Stuart Dining Hall on New- 
ton, where he first began to 
cherish the intimacy of BC de- 
spite its vast population. Now 
as a senior, he enjoys unwind- 
ing with his roommates and a 
good tobacco pipe in the back 
of their mod. Although Jay 
has also experienced his share 
of disappointments at BC, he 
recalls the words of Martin 
Luther King, Jr.: "One should 
let their convictions shine 
through in crisis." 



"Fame dies and honors perish; 

but loving-kindness is immortal." 

-from The Little Colonel ~ 

"I can honestly say that she is the most considerate, caring, 
honest, trustworthy, and wonderful person I know. Not only is 
she a great friend and roommate, but her exemplary qualities 
are also reflected in our own school." 

Bridget Sherry has had an impact on many students during 
her time at BC, as can be seen by the quote above from her 
roommate Lindsay Taylor. As a freshman, Bridget arrived at 
BC as a member of the Emerging Leadership Program. Her 
immediate participation in EC's dynamic stvident-run program 
paved the way for her eventual leadership in programs such as 
PULSE, Campus School, UGBC, MLP, Salt and Light, and El 
Salvador Immersion. Bridget has been very involved in UGBC 
and as Director of Faculty-Student Administration Relations 
her junior year, Bridget had the chance to work with faculty in 
such events as Breaking the Barriers and the Mary K. Waldron 
Award. Her outstanding talents were recognized by faculty 
when she was asked to be a TA for Courage to Know, one of the 
Cornerstone courses for freshmen. 

As eager and willing as Bridget was to take advantage of the 
numerous opportunities at BC, she encountered a time when 
she realized she was overinvolved and lacking in free time for 
herself. Bridget reevaluated her agenda and now makes time 
for herself by playing the piano, spending time in Boston, and 
reading on St. Mary's lawn. A Theology major with an informal 
concentration in Human Resources, Bridget hopes to volunteer 
after school through Jesuit Volunteers International. 

Perspectives 265 



''% 



Bill Kerrigan 



"I always prefer to believe the besi'^f everybody— it saves so much trouble. 
~ Rudyard Kipling ~ < 



You've seen him on campus. He's the guy in a yellow barn jacket, a plaid flannel, 
comfortably worn-in jeans, boots that ha ve done more than walkin', a grey scully . . . and 
a smile. More often than not, he's surrounded by and laughing with friends—in the 
dustbowl, the dining halls, after Mass and Appalachia meetings . . . even in the silence 
of Bapst, where he's been a regular since his freshman y^ar. 

Bill has been a part of a number of groups on campus. He was an OL in the summer 
of '97, has participated in several retreats, traveled to Cuernavaca, Mexico, and is an 
active member of the Liturgy Arts Group through which he can be found playing the 
guitar in the 9:30 Mass Sunday evenings. But most important to him has been his 
work with the Appalachia Volunteers. He became involved his freshman year, fell 
in love with it, and has devoted a majority of his time at BC to improving this already 
strong program. 

Bill was a junior coordinator and then head co-coordinator of Appalachia his 
senior year. He and his colleagues have attracted hundrMs of students to the 
program, whose membership exceeds 400 this year, making it the largest group of 
Appalachia volunteers on a college campus. For the last three years. Bill has gone 
to New Road, Virginia for Spring Break, each year growing closer to the community. 
The summer after his junior year, he established the New Road Summer Carhp and 
took 18 BC students to Virginia for an exhausting yet fulfilling week of playing 
games and entertaining a group of active and imaginative children. 

If you see him around, say hi. He has few actual acquaintances. Once^ person is 
introduced to him, the two quickly become close friends. As one person said, "in a 
very non-selfish way, discovering Bill— the person— increased my faith in people as 
a whole." Bill is gifted with the ability to make everyone around him feel comfort- 
able and important, acting as a friend, a listener, and often an entertainer. "He's a 

bright spot on this campus." // ,, , 

Well done is better than welhsaid.' ~ Ben Franklin 

BE ALIVE... Think freely. Smile Often. Tell those you love that you do. Rediscover old friends. Make new ones. Hope. Grou 




Tracy Madsen 



u 




"1 wish that 1 could fully articulate the sort of individual that she is. Her 
warmth and caring for the well-being of people she doesn't even know, 
the dedication to social justice that is alive within her, and her willingness 
to laugh and have fun are just some of the best ingredients that can be used 
to describe Tracy. In short, she is one of those people wfio simply makes 
Boston College a better place." 

. Tracy, a Colorado native with experience living as far away as Japan, 
was drawn to BC by the school's commitment to education and service. 
Those aspects of school have definitely been a part of Tracy's four years 
in Chestnut Hill. She is still amazed by the devotion students havato 
service— hundreds wake up at 7 on a Saturday morning to help out at 
Festival of Friendship, a sight unseen on most campuses. Tracy partici- 
pated in the Jenks Leadership Program and worked to establish a tutoring 
program at Boston High School for her final project. Tracy has shared her 
time and love with people outside of BC, as well. She has babysat for the 
same family for the past few years, and lights up at the mention of the two 
children she has grown so close to. 

Tracy's dedication to the Appalachia Volunteers progYam is also 
apparent. "She has infused so much time and energy into the group that 
it is very much a part of who she is; the strength and equality of the 
program most certainly reflects those efforts." She has gone to Lynchburg, , 
VA several times and pioneered a group of students to Cat's Bridge, VA 
her senior year. Tracy plans to continue her service after graduation and 
hopes to eventually work for Habitat for Humanity. 



266 



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Perspectives 



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CoNNffi Lynch 

So'fi-spoken and kind, enthusiastic and supportive, creative 
ind intelligent. In short, arr amazingly talented and caring 
person whose hurrianitaTian gf forts have defined her life at BC. 
Zonnie Lynch, an English major with a Faith, Peace, and Justice 
minor, has become what one friend describes as "what Boston 
Zollege should strive to produce from its volunteer programs." 

Connie grew up in Connecticut and came to BC with hopes 
Si becoming part of a strong community. She became involved 
A^ith 4BOSTON and^ has continued her commitment to it 
:hroughout her career at Bostoij College. She has volunteered 
it the Boston Living Center and the Jackson Mann Adult 
Education Center. She served on council her senior year, 
jading a group of students to the Women's Lunch Place each 
week. Connie has also been an integral part of the Navajo 
Sfation immersion program. She participated in it her junior 
i^ear and led the group over venter break her senior year. She 
las also participated in Appalachia, travelling to Nazareth 
Farms and leading trips to Max Meadows. While Connie has 
3een blessed with these volunteer opportunities, she wishes 
:hat mdfe students at BC could share her experiences and be 
involved with community service. Despite" the, number of 
jpportunities on campus, there still isn't enough for everyone. 

In her free time, Connie enjoys spending time with her 
roommates and playing frisbee on Bapst Lawn. Her insightful 
:on^ersations and contagious laughter make her a pleasure to 
oe around. She hopes to continue her service after graduation 
in a program sufch as JVC and to eventually work for a nonprofit 
Drganization. 



'There are no great things to be done. 

only sniall things with great love. " - 

~ Mother Theresa ~ 



> 



Akbar Rahman 





X 



~\ 



"Be kind.for everyoneyou meet is fighting a harder battle. 
-Plato- 



"The most exotic journey would not be seeing a 

thousani^ different places but to see (Ksingle place 

thrmigh a thousand persons ' eyes. " 

~ Anonymous ~ 

You've seen him on the cover of the Dustbowl magazine. 
How appropriate that it's one of his favorite places on campus! 
Akbar came from a dynamic background in California, and his 
initial irnpression of BC was that it lacked diversity. He soon, 
came to find that BC's diversity was not necessarily that of 
color, but of opinion and personality. 

Akbar's natural leadership qualities have allowed him to 
effectively guide others. As one friend says " Akbar is truly the 
embodiment of the Jesuit motto 'Educating Men and Women 
for Others'." Akbar's commitment |o coijimunity service is 
apparent through his work with Appalachia, 4 Boston, and 
BC's Immersion programs. One of Akbar's greatest challenges 
bver his four years at BC was creating and organizing an 
immersion trip to El Salvador, which he launched during the 
summer of '98. As an International Studies/Pre-Med major, 
Akbar plans to combine his education by first entering the 
Jesuit Volunteers International in Central America and then 
returning to the states to teach or to enter medical school. 

Whether or not he realizes it, Akbar has lived by BC's motto 

"Ever to Excel" by giving 110% in everything he does, while 

still preserving his identity and the "essence of Akbar" in all the 

roles he has played. Akbar's impact on those around him is 

apparent when talking to his friends. "He is one of those people 

who is a litmus from which many of us measure ourselves and 

is well respectedby students, faculty, staff and administration 

alike' There is little I can say to encapsulate Akbar, for he is such 

a powerful presence and humble person. In short, he is the type 

5f person that will leave BC and go into the world and impact 

many people's lives along the way. After all, he has already 

begun doing so." • ^ . 

_ Perspectives 26 



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Katelyn Rosa 



As students, we live through our college lives and active summers 
with the silent comfort of returning to BC every August and January. It 
is difficult for most of us to imagine leaving BC at the end of our 
sophomore year and returning to BC as a senior a year later. Imagine 
missing all the BC football games, the trip to Notre Dame, the junior 
Christmas dance, and the excitement of landing a summer job. Now 
imagine spending a year in Spain. Everyday you would be challenging 
yourself, trying to communicate in a different language and struggling 
to understand cultural differences. Now imagine yourself falling in love 
with a completely different city, culture, and way of life than you have 
been accustomed to... imagine yourself sitting at a cafe with a glass of 
Sangria and a journal with lilacs crawling up the side of the cafe fagade. . . 
This was just the case for Katelyn Rosa, and you have just pictured the 
brief essence of what Katelyn's abroad experience was like. 

True enough that Katelyn left BC as a sophomore, but tliis absence did 
not deter her from getting involved on campus as a freshman, sopho- 
more, and senior. She had extensive experience guiding freshmen as an 
OL, as a tour guide and panelist for SAP, and as a 48 Hours Leader. Her 
involvement in SAP reaffirmed her love of BC and all it has to offer those 
who step up and participate. When Katelyn was abroad, she took along 
the many experiences and life lessons she had learned from her PULSE 
placement at a center for people with HIV and those experiencing drug 
and alcohol abuse. 

Katelyn has had the unique experience of being an active part of BC 
and has taken advantage of growth opportunities abroad, as well. 
Nowadays, she can be found on Bapst lawn on a sunny day with her 
journal. . .and is that a sangria in her hand. . .?? 



changed my ideas; they've gone through and 




'Emily Bronte 




',, like tears, like for fears, 
"h:'ut shout Jet it all out just for my peers, 
•' like it's time to unwind, 
— ; of 1999" 

-Outkast 



270 Pcrsr 



Ed Zacharias 

Ed Zacharias, hailing from Toledo, Ohio, arrived at BC secure in h 
"self" but wondering if, faced with the larger "world" of BC, he'd t 
forced to fit into a mold. In spite of his initial concerns, Ed remaine 
true to his course, finding that while BC challenged him to question h 
ways, his experiences here and the people he's met have served \ 
strengthen his morals and shape his character. 

Ed has taken "Ever to Excel" to heart in a number of areas, brand 
ing out and meeting people who have strongly affected his four yea 
at BC. As one friend says, "Anyone who knows Ed will say that lij 
makes people the most important part of his personal experience. 
His sincerity is refreshing." 

Ed's active involvement on campus can hardly be missed. I 
enrolled in PULSE as part of his freshman year curriculum, and it w 
one of the best classes he ever took. His role as a Big Brother for youi 
AJ was an amazing experience. He's kept in touch with AJ over t 
past few years and has continued to work with the PULSE prograi 
serving on the Council his junior and senior year. The PULSE off! 
has become one of his favorite places on campus, a spot that feels li 
home and surrounds Ed with people who share his feelings abo 
service. "Ed seems to gain life from this line of work and it shows 
how much life he himself exudes." 

Ed has continued his work with children through Project 2000 
program which has been on campus since the eighties but which h 
gained membership and exposure over the past few years under t 
leadership of Ed and roommate Gerard O'Shea. Ed also led a 48 Hoi 3 
trip and will miss the community and all the amazing opportunit is 
available on campus when he graduates in the spring. 



Pat McMahon 



"Charismatic, thoughtful, friendly, happy, concerned, and 
iincere" is how one member of the UGBC Cabinet describes Pat 
^/[cMahon. Pat, a history major and environmental studies 
ninor, has taken EC's motto to heart and applied it not only to 
limself, but has used it to benefit those around him. "Ever to 
ixcel", to Pat, is to pursue excellence for yourself and for your 
:ommunity. Pat himself has undergone a process to truly 
anderstand and reach his own potential. Realizing halfway 
ihrough his college career that he was losing interest in his 
ictivities and only going into them halfhearted, he knew he had 
:o reconsider his commitments. Pat decided to stop swimming 
"or EC's Varsity Swim Team and instead to focus on activities 
:hat were more academic and spiritual in nature. His demand- 
ng schedule with UGEC forced him to decide what parts of his 
ife were essential and which were superfluous. These adjust- 
iients have made all the difference to Pat and have allowed him 
:o initiate the changes he's effected within the university. 

Pat spends a majority of his time in McElroy, serving as the 
president of UGEC. , He also spent Spring Ereak with the 
\ppalachia Volunteers; venturing to New Road, Virginia his 
unior year, and has participated in the Jenks Leadership Pro- 
gram. He still enjoys swimming and running, even going so far 
js to train for the marathon his junior and senior years. He loves 
ranging out with his friends and values every moment they 
spend together, especially those laid-back conversations late at 
night in their mod. 




"To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield. 
~ from "Ulysses" , by Alfred Lord Tennyson 



Mary Catherine Savard 



Mary Catherine has had the opportunity here at EC to learn as 
much from her classroom education as she has learned through her 
actual hospital nursing experience. Not only have books and 
assignments contributed to her learning, but professors and patients 
have taught her the true essence of being a nurse. 

Mary Catherine is a person who does not give to receive, she gives 
just to give. As an Ignacio volunteer her sophomore year she 
traveled to Belize and was deeply affected by her time there. The 
citizens in Belize have practically nothing in regards to what Ameri- 
cans think is essential, yet they are very happy. "Belize was so raw 
and untouched, so innocent", were some of the words Mary Catherine 
used to describe the country 

Not only has Mary Catherine been touched by patients and 
foreign citizens, she has been touched by and has reached out to 
many students on EC's campus as well. As a 48 Hours leader she was 
able to share her experiences at EC with freshmen and be a "turn to" 
student when they had questions or concerns. She also took part in 
the Sophomore/Junior Retreat to get to know more students and to 
better know herself. As a senior she stepped up to the challenge of 
being president of the Boston College Chorale. Not only is Mary 
Catherine an abundance of smiles when you see her on campus, she 
has a voice like and angel and thoroughly enjoys sing-alongs and 
special performances. Mary Catherine has said that she has done 
more than she ever expected at EC. She has excelled at every 
opportunity presented to her— singing all 4 years with the Boston 
Pops at the Pops on the Heights fundraiser is just one of those rare 
opportunities. 




'Our greatest glory is not in falling, 

but in rising each time we do." 

~ Unknown ~ 



Perspectives 2' 



Katie Wickham 

We've all had our leg fall asleep while we're sitting on the 
Dustbowl chatting with friends on a sunny afternoon. But imag- 
ine leaping up as you hear the Gasson bells signal the beginning 
of class, and immediately finding yourself back on the ground 
because your sleepy legs can't support you. This happened to 
Katie Wickham freshman year, but while some of may have laid 
mortified on the ground, Katie laughed it off and bounced right 
up again, just as she always does. 

Katie was active in community service in high school, but took 
a break her freshman year at BC, which was spent trying to find 
her place on the Heights while still keeping up with her studies. 
Before returning for her sophomore year, Katie realized that what 
had made her so happy in high school was her work with the 
community and that she hadn't yet taken advantage of the numer- 
ous service opportunities at BC. She started by getting involved 
in the 4BOSTON program, through which she volunteered time at 
the Jackson Mann Preschool. She was easily elected to the 
4BOSTON council her junior year and continued that position her 
senior year. The experience she gained through 4BOSTON, Jenks, 
Kairos, Marketing Academy, UGBC, and Appalachia gave her the 
confidence and initiative to work with a few other seniors in 
establishing the Volunteer Clearing House as an answer to the 
overwhelming demand for service opportunities at BC. 

Anticipating the ending of her senior year, Katie has slowed 
down—just a bit—and has focused on spending more time with her 
friends. Katie's future plans include the challenge of starting 
something new and finding a job where she can be happy doing 
what she loves most. 

Joy Ramsbotham 



"Success is living up to your potential. 

Wake up with a smile and go after life. 

Live it, taste it, smell it, feel it." 

~ Joe Kapp ~ 




itlit 



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irther 




"The Will of God will not place you, 

where the Grace of God will not keep you. 

~ Unknown ~ 



nmrifiemher days, we remember moments. 
~ C. Pavese ~ 



Joy has shined on the field ever since she was recruited as 
starting freshman for the Eagles Varsity Field Hockey tean 
Though her position as fullback requires tough defense, she 
also one of the team's leading scorers, known for her kilk 
corner drives. Over the years, the team has grown strongt 
with her participation, and last year BC was named the "Bi 
East Champions." Joy underwent back surgery last spring, h\ 
she was back on the field as captain this fall, leading the teai 
to national ranking. 

Joy's skill and finesse in field hockey has led her to a spot cl 
the United States National Team, which competes at a pri 
Olympic level. With the team, she has traveled all over tl| 
world to places such as Chile and Holland. This experience h<| 
brought Joy recognition on the national level. 

In addition to being an outstanding athlete, Joy is also know 
for being a true friend. She is always ready for adventure ( 
willing to help someone move or run errands, despite her bui 
schedule of practice, school, and work. And as many friem 
and teammates can testify, Joy is an outstanding, yet humb 
athlete. She is also a dear friend and the epitome of tin 
management. As Joy finishes up her BC career, she is going 
miss her team, playing on Alumni Field, the city of Boston, ar 
feeling so lucky to have been given so much. 



Jhanice Domingo 



"Was that just 'little' Jhanice Domingo who was thrown up 
. the air to account for our 47-point lead against the Syracuse 
am?" "Yeah, but little is not the right word to describe 
jr. . .exuding an abundance of energy and kindness would be 
ore appropriate, and I don't think we have ever had a 47- 
Dint lead!" 

Many know Jhanice as "that girl who can do the 'stick 
ince'," as their TA for Introduction to Feminisms, as the 
irector of Women's Issues for UGBC, as a volunteer at the 
assachusetts Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Children, as 
member of the Dance Troupe, or as one who frequents the 
'RC. But while Jhanice may be small in stature, "little" is 
irdly the word to describe this fun-loving, energetic, and big- 
parted senior. Over the past four years, Jhanice has taken 
Ivantage of the Jenks Leadership Program, developed a Big 
ster After School Program here at BC, and is currently work- 
g with the administration to incorporate a diversity training 
■ogram for faculty. 

Jhanice was one of the recipients of the hate e-mail that was 
nt to a number of minority student leaders at BC in the fall. 
Ithough she was deeply hurt by this letter, the experience has 
affirmed her desire to pursue a career in law after graduation, 
anice has not just excelled academically while at BC, she has 
rther the opportunity for others to excel at BC by organizing 
scholarship fund for women who raise awareness about 
omen's issues. 



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"Happiness is not having what you want, 

but wanting what you have." 

~ Anonymous ~ 



Colleen Carney 

When asked the question, "If you could spend the day with 
anyone, who would it be and where would you go?". Colleen 
replied, "I'd take Janis Joplin to the Mods!" This creative yet 
thoughtful remark is characteristic of Colleen's spontaneous and 
energetic personality. Colleen, a Communications major and Faith, 
Peace, and Justice minor, is one of the many at BC who are able to 
bridge the worlds between active socializing and a full load of 
classes and service. 

Colleen has taken what she has learned in a classroom setting and 
carried it beyond four walls into the world beyond BC by participat- 
ing in numerous immersion trips. As a sophomore, she traveled to 
Belize with the Ignacio Volunteers. Her charismatic personality was 
recognized when she was asked to lead the same Belize trip the 
following year and to be a leader for the Jamaica trip the spring of her 
junior year. She has also spent time leading Kairos retreats, playing 
Rugby, and volunteering through PULSE. 

Colleen's first exposure to BC was attending football games with 
her parents. The spirit of the players, fans, and students instilled 
within her a desire to attend BC. Now as a senior at BC, she still 
catches the games with her parents and enjoys celebrating with 
family and friends afterwards in the Mods. 

One close friend described Colleen as "nothing short of a bless- 
ing... Her smile, energy, love and concern for others has changed 
this campus by making people strive to be better She is one the most 
genuine and generous people I have ever encountered and 1 trust her 
as a daughter trusts a mother. Her presence as a student of Boston 

College has made this place more enthusiastic, fun, and true." 

Perspectives 273 



Jim Spillman and Turner Buford 



WANTED: Pastoral Campus Minister with exter\sive experi- 
ence in Chaplaincy and Salt and Light. Thorough knowledge 
of the Boston College campus a plus, sense of humor and 
concern for others a must. If your name is not Jim Spillman, Big 
Jim, or Coach, you need not apply! 

A job like this can only be filled by people with special 
characteristics such as those possessed by Jim Spillman. These 
include a gift for introducing the school to prospective students 
through SAP's campus tours and panels, a commitment to 
service through programs such as Appalachia, Salt and Light, 
48 Hours, and the SJ retreat, and giving 100% in every situation. 

Like most students, Jim has formed numerous friendships 
over his four years and he is committed to strengthening them 
at every chance he gets. Although Jim's schedule is filled from 
the time his alarm goes off until his head hits the pillow at night, 
one could never tell by the way he always takes the time to stop 
and talk with his friends. It's obvious that Jim has had an 
enormous effect on those around him. One of his roommates 
feels that Jim is "the most pious, generous, and unselfish person 
there is. He is truly what we all should aspire to be when we 
think of 'men and women for others' and 'ever to excel'." 

When how Jim spends his free time, he immediately told us 
about his favorite time of day. He and his roommates have 
made it a point to spend time together this year—they meet each 
night for an 1 1 :00 game of cards. This is sacred time— doors and 
phones are left unanswered, and a running total is kept of each 
person's wins. Shortly after Jim left, we talked to his roommate 
Turner Buford, who had the exact same response to our ques- 
tion. It's obvious that this time is special to both friends. 




"The day will come when, after harnessing space, the winds, 
the tides and gravitation, we shall harness for God the 
''• Jove. And on that day, for the second time in the 
: ' ()/ the world, we shall have discovered fire. " 
~ Teilhard de Char din- 

274 Perspectives 




"All that I have seen readies me to trust 

the Creator for all that I have not seen " 

~ Ralph Waldo Emerson ~ 

Turner, like his close friend Jim, is full of life and energ 
Barely 2 minutes pass before we're out of breath from laughir 
so hard! Turner, a Presidential Scholar majoring in politic 
science, has donated a majority of his time at BC to the Res 
dence Hall Association Council and to EC's Film Board, i 
enjoys RHA because, as a council member, he has direct inp' 
into the program's actions. He's found it fulfilling to be i 
responsive to student needs on campus. The Film Board is oi 
of BC's oldest clubs, and Turner and his colleagues, ha'' 
worked hard to increase the Board's actions on campus; rece 
attendance has increased steadily. Turner has also worke 
with the Neighborhood Volunteer Center tutoring, childre: 
was an RA in CLX his junior year, and spends any freo^^tinil 
playing intramurals with his roommates. 

Turner's experience at the Legal Aid Society in New Yo 
City last summer instilled in him a desire to attend law schoi 
where he hopes to use the knowledge he's gained at BC in 
positive way. Jim, like his roommate Tvxrner, also has defirii 
plans for the future. His include teaching in an urban envirc 
ment after graduation and then returning to school for pastor 
mirlistry. He hopes to eventually land a job in the chaplain 
department of a college "campus. BC is keeping its fingt 
crossed.. 





J) asked ^od joi alt tkin^s, 

that 3 nxL^kt enjo\^ ii-^e. 

^od ^ave U-^e, 

that 3 nxl^kt enyoif alt things. 

~ Y^nknoivn ~ 



Sometimes ifout joif Ls the 

soutce o-^ uout smite, but 

somctLtnes uoui smite can be 

the souice p^ uout jou. 

~ ^hick A3kat cfiank ~ 





Perspectives 27 




y^V'ery man Is tAc urMUct oi Als 
OW-n iorti/int. 



Seniors 277 



sM to Ah friend i^orks tvvo 

contmry Meets) hr It rcAon^UtA 

hyS/ (inA ctittatk ^ytt^S m AdtL 

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TJ^ Seniors 




Seniors 279 





Moustapha Abounadi 

School of Management 
Finance 



Nicko Abraham 

Advancing Studies 
Psychology 




Loren Acker 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Erin M. Ackerman 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Caitlin Adams 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Bradley Alan 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Jason Albert! 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jennifer Alden 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Mathmatics 



Kathryn C. Alexander 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jessica Aliberti 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Gregory U. Almeida 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jennifer A. Almeida 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kimberly S. Alemian 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Sarah L. Almy 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



280 Se 




Joel Amico 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Mark Amirault 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Christian T. Amundsen 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Stephanie Anastasia 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Elizabeth B. Anathan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Erin J. Anderson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Heather M. Anderson 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Chemistry 



Rachael Anderson 

Education 
Human Development 



Timothy Anderson 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Ryan AndreoU 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Lauren E. Angelo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Marisa T. Annino 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Seniors 281 



James Antoine 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Sociology 



Luz E. Arce 

School of Management 
Operations Planning 



Cara Antonacci 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Sadi Antonmattei 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Chris Anzellotti 

School of Management 
General Management 



David Appleyard 

Arts & Science 
English 




Robert A. Arcoro 

School of Management 
Finance 



Melissa B. Argyelan 

School of Management 
Finance 



Patricia Armelin 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michael Arquilla 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Art 





Chelsa M. Arscott 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Renetta M. Ascher 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




William B. Attwood 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 



Jason A. Aucoin 

School of Management 

Nursing 



282 Seniors 




Michael L. Auda 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Mark A. Audi 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Robert Aumiller 

School of Management 
Finance 



Javier Avino 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 





Shawn T. Aylward 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



hrin f li.ibin 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Brian A. Babineau 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Marketing 



Michael C. Babst 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Economics 



Stuart C. Bachelder 

School of Management 
Finance 




Jennifer Badaan 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Art 



Mona A. Badawy 

Arts and Sciences 



Ariana Bahret 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Paula L. Bacso 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Jaime Bailey 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Communications 



Seniors 283 




Laura L. Bailey 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Christian J. Baird 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Vandana Balachandar 

School of Management 
Marketing 



^ 


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4 1 


^^^^^^■I^^B ^ ^^^^^^^^k 




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^^^^H ^I^^^^^H 




Nicholas R. Balaji 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 


Gregory D. Ball 

School of Management 
Marketing 







Christine Barakat 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Gregory P. Barber Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Rafal Barczak 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Robert L. Barlow 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Tamika D. Barnes 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Christopher Barrett 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

MIS 



Brian M. Barrio 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



284 Se 




Kunta K. Barros 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Johnna Barry 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Shannon Barry 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Special Education 



Kelly Bartlett 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Mona L. Baruah 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Stephen S. Barwikowski 

School of Management 

Finance 

Management 



Robert A. Bateman 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Laura Batenic 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

French 



Bradley Battaglia 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Film Studies 



Alison Beals 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Meredith M. Beaton 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Michael Beattie 

School of Management 
Economics 



Gregory D. Bartoli 

School of Management 
Finance 




Erik Bator 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




William J. Beauchesne 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 




Sarah Becherer 

Arts and Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Jennifer L. Becker 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Amy Beckman 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 
Sociology 



Brian Belanich 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Accouting 



Christina Belaval 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Senior 285 




286 Seniors 




ki A^ppy ppidn Is not Ac CM-Ao secfHS 
CAhs to otAcrS/ {f'pit w-Ao sccphs 
tAns to AlmsUL 
— ^pi^CiCtPiS c^v^^i 



288 Senior 




Seniors 289 



km^f^' 



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m 








Leah T. Belazarian 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



David J Belford 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Janna Bell 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Special Education 



Kate Benoit 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Carolyn Berchoff 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Daniele M. Bergeron 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Regine Bergeson 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kathryn Berns 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Adam Berry 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Robert Berthiaume 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Yourajwattie Bhairo 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Cory Bilodeau 



School of Management 
Finance 



Paul Bibbo 

Arts &c Sciences 
Psychology 



Michael Biggan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Amy L. Bilics 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Adrianne K. Billingham 

Arts & Scienes 
History 




Jill Binkley 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Brian N. Binkowski 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Alison M. Birch 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Sarah Birch 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 






292 Seniors 



Shannon M. Bird 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Scott Birmingham 

Advancing Studies 
Information Processing 



Deidre Birnstiel 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



William F. Bisceglia 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Joel B. Biswas 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Frances Blanchette 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Karen H. Blanton 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 



Stephanie A. Blazewicz 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Kefryn Block 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 



Christine F. Boctor 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Seniors 293 



out lii/i^'^indi^ion. 
'X^kortdPi 




294 Seniors 




Seniors 295 




Seniors 297 




Angela Borzon 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Caroline A. Bosworth 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Lauren M. Bosworth 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 



Jeannine Bouche 

School of Education 
Early Childhood Education 



Jennifer Boutin 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Social Work 



298 Seniors 



Christopher P. Bowler 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jennifer Boyle 

School of Education 

Elementary & Special 

Education 



Noah S. Bowling 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Laura Boyd 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jason Beyer 

School of Management 

Accouting 

Finance 



Mary Claire Boyle 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Psychology 




Moira B. Boyle 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Sociology 



Monica R. Boyle 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Tara M. Bradley 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Marcos Bragado-Meana 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Patrick J. Brennan 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



John D. Breslin Jr 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 




Patrick T. Bresonis 

School of Management 
Finance 



Elwyn Brewster 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Seniors 299 




300 Seniors 




Seniors 301 




302 Senio 



hr tAe mopU i^ko 
m^kc US ^^ppy'/ tAcy 

art tkn ckdrmtH'' 
^arAcmrs w-ko make 

CfKT sopils Hossom. 
y%arcd ^npist 




Seniors 303 



Nicole Brewster 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Caroline A. Breyley 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jeffrey A. Bridge 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jennifer K. Briggs 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Elizabeth H. Brogan 

School of Education 

History 
Secondary Education 




Kevin T. Brophy 

School of Management 
Finance 



Dawn A. Brown 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Eileen B. Brown 

School of Management 
Finance 



Elena Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Gena Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 





Matthew B. Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Megan Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 




Timothy A. Brown 

School of Management 
Accoimting 



Wade A. Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



304 Seniors 



/tfM'W'P*^ 




Jennifer N. Bucci 


Tammy Buchan 


Brendan B. Buckley 


Daniel J. Buckley 


Anne Buckman 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts &C Sciences 


Biology 


Communications 


Marketing 


Marketing 


English 
Theater 




Carol Budzik 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Christopher T. Bulens 

Arts & Sciences 

Theology 
Communications 



Michele Burderi 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Christopher J. Burke 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Daniel Burke 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Seniors 305 




l^ kt Al^Acst com.pCiHvcnt on<i can 

h to ^c tolA: "'^tcdpisn o^ i^k^t 
yon arc, mpi are csscntlat to 

yXatkanut "^rdnAin 



Seniors 307 



William Quinn Burke 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jacqueline Burkhardt 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Matthew Brunell 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Megan Burns 

School of Management 

Finance 



Bridget Burstein 

School of Management 
Finance 




Steven W. Bussen 

School of Management 
Finance 




Joseph Byers 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 





Thomas Bustros 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Patrick Byrne 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



<^- 



Sarah Byrnes 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Cynthia B. Cabral 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



William J. Cadigan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Art History 



Alison Cahill 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Bridget Cahill 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



308 Seniors 



George Cahill 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Richard Cahill 

School of Management 
Finance 



Lee Calamis 

School of Education 
Moderate Special Needs 



John J. Calcaterra 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jennifer Callahan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 




Sara Calnen 

School of Management 
Finance 



Sara L. Camden 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



CoUette Cameron 

School of Education 

Political Science 
Human Development 



Alfred A. Caminos 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



David Campbell 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Peter L. Campbell 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Information Systems 



Sherice S. Campbell 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Leah Cannan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Christopher M. Capozzi 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information System 



Michelle A. Cardella 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

English 



John Cardillo 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Anthony Cardone 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Hayley Cammeyer 

School of Education 
Moderate Special Needs 




Canh N. Cao 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 




Frederic P. Cardone 

School of Managemrnt 
Accounting 
Marketing 



Senior 309 



Amy E. Carignan 

School of Education 

Elementary & Special 

Education 



Robert Carley 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Matthew Carmell 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 



Colleen C. Carney 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Cathleen Carpenter 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Christopher Carr 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Mary K. Carr 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Sybil A. Carrade 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Yvonne Carrero 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Kerry A. Carroll 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Kevin Caruso 

School of Management 
Finance 



Matthew Casamassinia 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jaclyn Casey 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

English 



Sarah Casey 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
( Oninumications 



David W. Cashman 

Arts & Sciences 

History 




Patrick Cassidy 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



Christina A. Cassis 

School of Management 
Accounting 



David Castagnetti 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater 



JulianaCastelli 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Eric A. Cataldo 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



310 Seniors 



Escel J. Catambay 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



David Catrini 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Cherilyn D. Caulfield 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Erin Caulfield 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Mark-AnthonyJ. Cautela 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 




Joshua Cella 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Kate G. Cellucci 

School of Management 
Accounting 





Michelle L. Chadwick 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Veeken Chaglassian 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 
Economics 



Glenn M. Chaleff 

School of Management 
Finance 



Erin M Chalmers 

School of Education 

Elementary & Special 

Education 



Megan E. Cellitti 

School of Education 

English 

Early Childhood 




Matthew Chabot 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Stephen Chamberland 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Seniors 311 





Joy Chambers 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Mun Chan 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Terrence Chan 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

MIS 



Lauren Chancier 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Michele D. Charbonnet 

Advancing Studies 
Psychology 



Geraldine E. Charles 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Sean Chase 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jason Cheney 

School of Management 



312 Seniors 



Gwen M. Cherne 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



David Cherubin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Molly Childs 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Wai Nang Chan 
School of Management; 
Accounting | 

Finance ' 




PatrickJ. Chatfield 

School of Managemen 
General Management: 




Geoffrey K. Chipman 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



JeffChiumiento 

School of Management 

Finance 

Computer Science 



James Choi 

School of Management 

Finance 

MIS 



Marc Chouchani 

School of Management 

Finance 

Operations 



Angela O. Chow 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Susan Christie 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Jeffrey A. Christoforetti 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

History 



Christine M. Cinella 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Anthony Cirri 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Connie Chu 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Joseph Ciampi 

School of Management 
Economics 



Jennifer Cibulka 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Marc Cicero 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Scott J. Cirillo 

School of Management 

Finance 

MIS 




Alyssa Clapp 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Seniors 313 




l^ THC Adpplmss consists not In the 
tHnltltnAc 0^ ^rlcnAs. 
{mt In tkd i^ortk UnA cko\cc, 
'E>^'^ ^oknson 



314 Seniors 




Seniors 3 1 5 



Megan A. Clark 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Paul W. Clausing 

School of Management 
Finance 



BrianJ. Clemente 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Keith M. Clemente 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Timothy J. Cloran 

Arts & Sciences ' 

Environmental Geosciencfl 




Jessica L. Coccaro 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



MelissaJ. Cody 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Psychology 



Leigh Cofran 

Arts & Sciences 
Pyschology 




Christine Cojohn 

School of Mangement 

Finance 

Marketin: 



Rebecca Colacchio 

Arts & Sciences 
Pyschology 




Katharine Colbert 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Kathleen Colbert 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




PriscillaCole 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Maragret Colleran 

School of Managemer 

Finance 



316 Seniors 




Radharani A. Collins 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Colleen Concannon 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Melissa Colon 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Marguerite Colton 

School ot Education 
Elementary Education 
Moderate Special Needs 



Brian Compagna 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Seth Conant 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Jeffrey Concannon 

School of Managemnt 
Accounting 



Brett P. Condron 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Edward M. Cordon 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Political Science 



Joseph G. Conlon 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Seniors 31' 



Victoria Connell 

School of Education 
ElementaryEducation 



Colleen Connors 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Courtney A. Connolly 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kara A. Conroy 

School of Management 

Economics 

Management 



Bridget A. Cooney 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Matthew Cooney 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Brian A. Corby 

School of Management 
Finance 





Adam Coppola 

School of Management 
Finance 




Kathleen Corcoran 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Kelly A. Corcoran 

School of Management 
Finance 



Leighton J. Core 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Susan M. Cormican 

Arts & Sciences 

Hispanic Studies 

English 



Janis Cornwell 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Michael Correia 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



318 Seniors 



Leon E. Correy 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Jane E. Corsiglia 

School of Management 
Human Resources 



Samuel Cortes 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Elizabeth Cosentino 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Salvatore Costagliola 

School of Management 

Operations and Stategic 

Management 





Elizabeth Costello 

Arts &: Sciences 
History 



Maryanne C. Costello 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Melissa R. Costigan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Karen Coyle 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Heather J. Cozza 



Arts & Sciences 
Sociologoy 




Lael S. Cragin 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Ani) L. Cidig 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



Jonathan Creamer 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Emily J. Creighton 



Arts & Science 
English 



Stephanie Crenient 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Ryan C. Cremins 

School of Managment 
Finance 



Jessica Crespo 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Patrick Criscillo 

School of Managment 

Accounting 

Finance 



Maureen Cronin 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Robert P. Cronin 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Senior 319 




J nm not d^mld 0^ storms ^or J tim 
Uaryuyii^ to S4t( my s^lp. 

— Sjoiusa yK^'^/iUott 



320 Seniors 




Seniors 321 




k^ HHCiCilmincA (He Is not i/vortk 
Clvln^, ^kt nnCiv-cA CtU Is mt w-ortk 



322 Seniors 




Seniors 323 



Scott Cronin 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Anne C. Gallery 



School of Education 
Human Development 



Timothy R. Curtin 



School of Management 
Operations Management 



Kelly M.Cross 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Adam Crowley 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Arts 



Brigid Crowley 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Nicholas Curelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Andrew M. Curran 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Christopher Curran 

Arts &C Sciences 
Psychology 



Welles R. Crowther 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Timothy Curry 

Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

Art History 




KimberlyA. Curtis 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Heidi Cushing 

Arts & Science 
Psychology 



Kathleen M. Cusick 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michael T. Cwiklinski 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




A. Carolina D'Agostino 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Damian D'Angelo 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Psychology 



Martha Dabagian 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Adriana Dabbene 

School of Management 
Finance 



Matthew L. Dadaian 

School of Management 
Finance 



324 Seniors 



Amanda Daffer 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Beth Daigneault 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



John R. Dailey 

School of Management 
Finance 



Anokhi Dalia 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Meaghan E. Dalton 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Spanish 




Margot Danzig 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Alfonso Darquea 

School of Management 

Operations Strategic Mgmt 

Finance 



Jayanta R. Das 

Arts & Science 
Biology 



Kristen D. Dauenhauer 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Jeffrey). Davide 

School of Management 
Finance 



Seniors 325 





Mark J. Davidson 

School of Management 
Finance 



Christopher P. Davide 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 





Amanda Davis 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Bonnie Davis 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Laurel Davis 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Sarah H. Davis 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Timothy Davis 

School of Education 

English 
Human Development 



Kristen De Amicis 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Margarida De Barros 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Maria De Barros 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Nicole De Blois 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 









Daila Davila 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Kelly A. Day 

Arts & Sciences 
Comunications 
Political Science 




Ryan De Grass 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



326 Se 



Alissa K. De Jonge 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Todd H. Deblois 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Anna De Leon 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Jaime De Los Reyes 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Charles C. De Martino 

Arts & Sciences 
Pyschology 



Sabrina Defabritiis 

Arts & Sciences 
Pyschology 



Mark Del Priore 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



KaraDelaney 

Arts & Sciences 
Pyschology 



David B. Dean 

School of Management 
Finance 




Timothy Delaney 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Tara Delsavio 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Leanne DeMarco 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Angela K. Demeter 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Brian J. DeNardo 

School of Management 
Finance 




Seniors 327 




Neal Denning 

School of Management 

Finance 



Gracia H. Deralus 

Advancing Studies 
Philosophy 



Magdalena Derdzinski 

Alts & Sciences 
Sociology 
Psychology 



Jennifer DeRosa 

School of Management 
Finance 



David M. DeSantis 

School of Management 
Finance 




Kelly A. DeSantis 

School of Education 

Early Education 
Elementary Education 



Amy DeSena 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Alaina A. DeVasto 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Alex DeVincenzo 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Brian C. Devine 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 





Gregory Devine 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Communications 



Laura M. Devine 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Patrice Devine 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Chandra Dewin 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 



328 Seniors 




Michael J. Dewind 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Joseph Di Bacco 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Stephen J. Di Rico 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Patrick Dillon 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Elizabeth R. Dexter 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Michelle L. Di NapoH 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Joseph B. Dickman 

School of Management 
Economics 



Anthoy DiCosmo 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Judy E. DiFonso 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Chemistry 



Mark F. DiGregorio 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 




MarkDiMartino 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Danielle Dineen 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kevin Dippold 

School of Management 

Finance 

OSM 



Margaret E. DLxon 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Sociology 



Seniors 329 




Jr;:>^ tkt ckan^t mn w-^nt to su m 
tAls vv-ortA. 



330 Seniors 




Seniors 331 




Daniel C. Doherty 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



David E. Doherty 

Arts & Sciences 
Ecomonics 



Joseph D. Doherty 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Thomas J. Doherty III 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Arthur T. Dolan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Elizabeth Dondero 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Daniel Donnellan 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Erin Donohue 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Michael Donohue 

School of Management 
MIS 



Colleen M. Donovan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



332 Seniors 



Stephanie Donovan 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



EUzabeth Doran 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 



Courtney L. Dornbusch 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Matthew Dornbush 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Economics 



Ellen M. Dowling 

Arts & Sciences 



Erik Dowling 

Arts & Sciences 



Susan Downey 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael G. Drage 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Christina Dow 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 




Johanthan D. Drake 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Noelle DriscoU 

School of Management 
Finance 



Conor Dubin 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Ryan E. Driscoll 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Alex J. Driver 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



KelleyA. Duane 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kristine Duckett 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



KellyA.Duddy 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
French 



Clare S. Duff 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



LindseyDubie 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 
Psychology 




Anne M. Duffy 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Seniors 333 



J^ttUr to Ct^kt a cundU tkiin to 
curse tkc A^rkncss. 




334 Seniors 




MEN 
WORKING 




Seniors 335 



Kyle R. Duffy 

School of Management 
Marketine 



John Duggan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Katharine R. Duggan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Mary Alexandra Dundics 

Arts & Sciences 

Finance 

Marketing 



Suzanne M. Duideavy 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Gregory M. Dunn 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Scott J. Dunn 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Catherine D urkin 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



336 Se 





Meredith Dunn 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Special Education 




Margaret S. Durante 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Alina Durso 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Brian Dwyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Daniel J. Dwyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Joseph M. Dwyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Lindsay L. Dwyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Meghan M. Dwyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Rachel J. Eaton 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 



Maria T. Echaniz 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jessica F. Edreich 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Psychology 




Jessica J. Egidio 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jason P. Eichner 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Michele Eickman 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Sociology 



Kristin A. Eisenzopf 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jennifer L. Ellis 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Suzanne J. Ellis 

School of Management 
Economics 



Collin P. Ely 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jessica Enianoul 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jessica S. Elias 

School of Management 

Finance 

Operations 




Rosana S. Emanuelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Rachel Enos 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Timothy L. Epstein 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Marita S. Erbeck 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Raul C. Erdossy 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Laura P. Erickson 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Senior 337 



Emily Estock 


Mariel A.Estrada 


Andrea Ettore 


Devin Evangelinos 


Jaime Fabert 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Biology 


Economics 


Psychology 


Political Science 



Sociology 




Paul Fabsik 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Alexandra Fahey 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Christopher Fallon 

School of Management 
Economics 



Cristina Falo 

Arts & Sciences 



Brian C. Fanning 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Psychology 




Megan Farmer 


Sara Farnan 


Jill Farrell 


Kristen Farrell 


Marissa Farris 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Elementary Education 


Psychology 


Accounting 


Mathematics 



' a 




MeredithFascett 

School of Management 
Economics 


Brian R. Fauvel 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 


338 Seniors 





Jean Fay 

School of Education 
Early Childhood Ed. 



Michelle Fekete 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



William Fennell 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 



Alicia Ferguson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



SarahFerguson 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources 



Christopher Ferrarone 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Nick Ferri 

Arts & Sciences 



Elysha M. Fiabane 

Arts & Sciences 
Linguistics 
Socioli 




Lindsay Field 

School of Management 
Marketing 




James Finchen 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 





Elisabeth Filarski 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 




Sean A. Finegan 

School of Management 
Economics 




Maria Finison 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Daniel D. Finkle 

School of Management 
Finance 



Noreen Finn 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Joseph W. Finnigan 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 
Philosophy 



Robert Fischette 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Seniors 339 




^L/H^ iS ^ h^tne^f^/ not a 

Acstln^thn, 

PinhnOlvn 



340 Seni. 




Seniors 341 




YyAnt^s U^t to Ao ti^Ur ^onr Ct^a 
cbccccAs your ArmtHs'r 



342 Seniors 




Seniors 343 





Edward Fitzpatrick 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jill Flannery 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Jennifer Flatley 

School of Managment 
Marketing 



Daniela M. Flemming 

School of Management 
Finance 




Kimberly Flynn 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Michael A. Fois 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Ryan P. Foley 

School of Management 
Finance 



Shane Foley 

School of Management 

Finance 

Management 



Christian Fonss 

School of Management 
Acoounting 




Saramarie Foody 

Arts 8c Science 

History 

Education 



Kelley T. Forbes 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Keira E. Ford 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Stephanie S. Ford 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Katherine A. Forgianc 

School of Education 
Human Development 



344 Se 



Kevin Forrest 


Frank Fortuna 


Mary J. Foster 


Elizabeth Fote 


Jessica R. Dugere 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Nursing 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Biology 


Economics 


Nursing 


Elementary Education 


Political Science 


Philosophy 


Finance 










Olivia J. Fowlie 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Patrick B. Fox 

Advancing Studies 
History 



Lizabeth Foxwell 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Rebecca Foy 

Arts & Sciences 



Kristen K. Francis 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Kristin I. Frazao 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Communications 



Ryan Freeman 

School of Management 
Finance 



Stacey L. Freda 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Alicia Freind 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Seniors 345 



Erin Frey 

Arts & Sciences 



Andrew Frye 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Anne C. Friedman 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Emily Frieswyk 

School of Management 

Finance 



Marissa Frishetti 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Dennis C. Fua 

Arts & Sciences 



Alexandra Furger 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Frank Fury 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Alexis Froehlich 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Human Development 




Jeanine Gabriele 

School of Management 
Marketing 





Mark T. Gafney 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Heather Gainer 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Melissa S. Gainer 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Steven Galante 

Art & Sciences 
Sociology 



346 Seniors 




Valerie Galasso 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Drew Gallagher 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

History 






Elizabeth Galiano 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Science 




Nolan A. Gallagher 

School of Management 
Marketing 





Antonio R. Gallardo 

School of Management 
French 
Finance 



Gregory T. Galligan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Reena Gambhir 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
American Studies 



Michael Gambino 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theology 



Steven R. Garcia 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Vivian Garcia 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Vivianna Garcia 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Joseph Gard 

Arts & Sciences 

Physics 

Mathematica 



Maria K. Gamez 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Arts 
Economics 




Heatherr C. Gardner 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Seniors 347 



Michael L. Gargiulo 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Abigail A. Garrison 

School of Education 
Early Childhood Education 



Sarah A. Garvey 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Amanda J. Gaul 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jeffrey Gaulin 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 





Joelle F. Geisler 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Mary-Beth George 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Christopher Gerlt 

Arts & Sciences 



Christopher S. Germain 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Carla A. Gerster 

School of Management 
Finance 



Laura P. Ghiglione 

School of Nursing 



James M. Gibson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
Spanish 



348 Seniors 



John D. Gilbert 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Sam H. Gilbert 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jeffrey Gilligan 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Paul Giovanniello 

School of Management 
Finance 



Erin Girard 

School of Nursing 




Benjamin Gird 

School of Management 
Finance 



Katherine A. Gladchuk 

Arts & Science 
Communications 



James H. Glavin IV 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Peter J. Glazer 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jennifer Gieason 

School of Management 

Finance 

Strategic & Operational Mgt. 




John D. Gieason 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



William J. Gieason 

Advancing Studies 



George Good 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Maureen Goodman 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Tracie Goodrick 

School of Management 
Marketing 




CoUtcn Grady 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Eric S. Graham 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Hilary Grahm 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Alison Grawbard 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 
Philosophy 



Douglas Gray 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



349 




flc {nrA c^n sc^^r too k\^k, y/ he 
soars t^ltA kls OW-n w-m^s. 



350 Senio 









Seniors 35 1 




- 


|f^r 


JJ .. -.^ ^ 




^^B-^'''" 





l/^nkyiDtM-n 




352 Senii 



Jonathan Graziano 

Arts & Science 
Political Science 



Kara Graziano 

Arts & Science 
Psychology 



Michael J. Green 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Samantha Greene 

Arts &: Science 
Communication 



Andrew Gregory 

Arts & Science 
Computer Science 




Stephen M. Grieco 

Arts & Science 
English 



Stephen Gritti 

Arts & Science 
History 



Anne Grignon 

Arts & Science 
English 



Hercules Grigos 

Arts & Science 
History 



Kristen Grimes 

Arts & Science 

English 



Patrick Groarke 

Arts & Science 
History 



DierdraGrode 

School of Education 

History 

Education 



Courtney E. Grubb 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Katherine E. Grump 

Arts & Science 
Economics 



Amity Guay 

Arts & Science 
Economics 



Sara Guerena 

Arts & Science 
Environmental Geoscience 



Michael Guido 

Arts & Science 
Biology 



Vincent D. Gripps Jr. 

Arts & Science 
History 




Francis J. Grueter IV 

Arts & Science 
Computer Science 




Maura A. Guilfoyle 

Arts & Science 
Biology 



354 Seniors 



y 



Alexander T. Gulla 

Arts & Science 
English 



Elena L. Gumina 

Arts & Science 
Italian 



Peder Gustafsone 

Arts & Science 
Economics 



Kristin Gustavson 

Arts & Science 
English 



Sally Habib 

Arts & Science 
Biology 




Emily S. Hack 

Arts & Science 
Biochemistry 




Lisa Hagermoser 

Arts & Science 
Psychology 





John P. Hall 

Arts & Science 
Chemistry 



Meaghan A. Halloran 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Special Education 



ErikaHampson 

Arts & Science 
Communication 



Christopher Hancock 

Arts & Science 
Psychology 



Amir A. Handani 

Arts & Science 
Political Science 



Seniors 355 



Lauren Handwerk 
Arts & Science 
slogy 



Cory Hanley 

Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Erin K. Hannon 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Special Education 



Edward A. Haponik 
School of Education 
Education 

Music 



Erin Harding 
Arts & Science 
Economics 




Suzanne Harrington 
Arts & Science 
Political Science 



Allison Harriott 
School of Education 
Human Development 



Alexa M. Harris 

Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Herbert A. Harrison 

Arts & Science 
Computer Science 



Marie E. Harrison 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



356 Seniors 



Jamie Hart 

School of Education 

Finance 

Marketing 



Kathleen A. Hart 

Arts & Science 

Environmental Geoscience 



Katie Hart 
Arts & Science 
Communication 



Shannon Hart 

Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Jennifer Hartonian 

Arts & Science 

Psychology 




Kristin Harvey 

Arts & Science 

English 



Jennifer Hassenberg 

Arts & Science 

Theater 



Mattlew R. Haverry 

Arts & Science 

Psychology 



Jacquelyn A. Hayden 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Brian Hayes 

Arts & Science 

Economics 




Guy E. Heald IV 

Arts & Science 

Communications 



Adam R. Healy 

Arts & Science 

Math 



Katherine T. Heekin 

Arts & Science 

English 



Sarah Hefferan 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Hillary Helm 

Arts & Science 

English 




Peter Hennessy 

Arts & Science 

Economics 



Christine Hermenegildo 

Arts & Science 

English 



Michelle J. Hermosura 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Education 



Javier A. Hernandez 

School of Management 

Economics 



Darryl Herrick 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Senior 357 




Laura A. Higgins 

School of Education 

Theater 
Human Development 



LisaA.HiU 

Arts & Science 
English 



Daniel C. Hickey 

Arts & Science 

Economics 

Mathematics 







I^V'^^ 


B^i^l 


1 \ ^ 1 


^Ull 



Dustin Highland 

School of Management 

Finance 
Operations Management 



Martha Hilfinger 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Benjamin D. Hill 

Arts & Science 
Economics 
Mathematics 



Kerry Hickey 

Arts & Science 
Psychology 




Laura Hill 

Arts & Science 
Political Science 




Mary Kate Hill 
School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Claudia Hinjosa 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Courtney Hischier 

Arts & Science 
Economics 



Robert Hodge Jr. 

School of Management 
Finance 



358 Seniors 



Jessica C. Hofifliine 

Arts & Science 
Communication 



Emily G. Hogan 

Arts & Science 
Philosophy 



Jonathan Hogan 

Arts & Science 
Communication 



Chrisopher Holland 

Arts & Science 
Biology 



Kathryn A. Holthaus 

Arts & Science 




Molly E. Honan 

Arts & Science 

English 
Communciation 



Heather Houston 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Erin E. Howngan 

Arts & Science 
English 



Shannon Hook 

Arts & Science 
Biochemistry 




John R. Howells Jr 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Cynthia Hsu 

Arts & Science 
Art History 



Sharon Hoops 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Allyson Horgan 

Arts & Science 
Biology 



Linda Horvath 

Arts & Science 

Poltical Science 

English 




Seniors 359 




1^0 {f-t k^(j3<p^, >^OPi Pt/iii&t ^hst m^kc 



360 Seniors 




Seniors 361 



tAcfuScCves tkdt no one else 

knows, ^ ^est ^rlenA Is someone 

i^ko tells ^OPi someMn^ ai^ont 

tAetuselves tkat tkey AlAnt 

even knOPv. 

t/inknovvn 





'i(yl Seniors 




Seniors 363 




dnA forever re^tlzc that the time Is 

ali^^'^s ripe to Ao rl^At. 

yfi^rtln XjH.tkeY -jKjln^ 



364 Seniors 




Seniors 365 



Minh Hua 

School of Management 
MIS 



Nicole T. Huard 

Arts & Science 
English 



Jaime Hughes 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources 



Alison Hultin 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Karrianne T. Humen 

School of Managemetn 
Accounting 



1 




1 


f 




^ 


\ 


f 


1 




Da\id P. Hungerford 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Caitlin K. Hurley 

Arts & Science 
History 



Daniel Hurley 

Arts & Science 
Economics 



Rebecca L. Hurley 

Arts & Science 
Environmental Geoscience 



John T. Hyland 

Arts & Science 





Heather R. lUingworth 

Arts & Science 

English 

Women's Studies 



Patricia E. Iragorri 

Arts & Science 
Biology 




Sean B. Irwin 

Arts & Science 
History 



Justin T. Isaac 

School of Managements i 
Finance 



366 Seniors 




Dana M. Isaacs 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Information Systems 



Lincoln Isetta 

School of Management 

Finance 

Political Science 




Sylvia M Jablonski 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jessica L. Jackson 

College of Advancing Studies 
Business Administration 





Monica Jackson 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Stephen Jacobson 

Arts & Science 

Economics 

English 



Richard A. Jacobson Jr. 

Arts & Science 
Political Science 



AiiiiL-\laiic Jannaci. 

Arts & Science 
Communications 



Coreyjaquez 

Arts & Science 
Philosophy 




Steven E. Jasulavic 

Arts & Science 

Biology 

Philosophy 



Rania Jawad 

Arts & Science 
English 



Joel F. Jean-Baptiste 

Arts & Science 
Political Science 



Dean Jeffe 

School of Management 
Finance 



Patrick Jennings 

Arts & Science 
Economics 



367 



Garyjennison 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Joseph A. Jerista 

Arts & Science 
Computer Science 



Hector Jimenez 

Arts & Science 
Economics 



Catherine Jiminian 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Matthew D.Joe 

Arts & Science 
Computer Science 




Michael O. Joel 

Arts & Science 
Economics 



Benjamin Johnson 

Arts & Science 
English 



Juliet A. Johnson 

Arts & Science 
Sociology 



Matthew R. Johnson 

School of Managemetn 
Accounting 



Jennifer Johnston 

School of Management 
Finance 



John R. Johnston 

Arts & Science 
Theater Arts 



Kenneth F. Johnston III 

School of Management 
Finance 



Sandra Jordan 

Arts & Science 
English 



Shawn R. Johnson 

Arts & Science 

Economics 
Political Science 




Seemajoshi j 

School of Management:! \j 

Finance f,. 




Marius Jungerhans 

Arts & Science 
Economics 




Deepa A. Kairen 

Arts & Science 

Psychology 
Political Science 



Theodore C. Kalmbach 

Arts & Science 
International Studies 



368 Seniors 



ft 



Chris Kane 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jason Kaufman 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Julie Keane 

Arts & Science 
Communications 




Catherine Kanyusik 

Arts & Science 
Psychology 



RafFi Karakashian 

Arts & Science 

Chemistry 
Political Science 



Laura K. Karosen 

School of Education 

English 
Elementaiy Education 







Brian S. Kelleher 

Arts & Science 
English 
History 



Erin P. Kellelier 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



MatthewJ. Kelly 

Arts & Science 
English 



Michael Kelly 

Arts & Science 
Mathematics 



Mayumi Kato 
School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 




Yasmeen L. Kazimi 

Arts & Science 
Economics 




Kristen Keefer 

School of Management 
Finance 




Sean P. Kelly 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Political Science 



Seniors 369 







370 Seniors 



Spencer S. Kelly 

School of Management 
Finance 



Sarah E. Kennedy 

Arts & Science 

Psychology 

Women's Studies 



Terrance I. Kerr 

Arts & Science 
Political Science 



Asad Khan 

Arts &( Science 
Economics 



Scott Keneally 

Arts & Science 
English 



Jennifer Kennedy 

Arts & Science 
Economics 



Karen Kennedy 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Special Education 






Syed M. Khan 

Arts & Science 
Psychology 



Patrick L. Kennedy 

Arts & Science 
History 




Christophers. Kiely 

Arts & Science 

French 

Communications 



Carter Kiesau 

Arts & Science 
Psychology 



Peter Kijac 

of Management 
Finance 
Economics 



372 Seniors 




Erina Kim 

School of Management 

General Management 

Marketing 



Won-Jung Kim 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Antoine Kinche 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Richard T. King 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



James D. Kinsey 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 




Joan Kirchhoff 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jill C. Kislia 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Economics 



Katherine Kissell 

Advancing Studies 
English 



Tara Kitley 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Maria Klara 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Kristen Klepper 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Rebecca Klim 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jennifer E. Klingler 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Computer Science 



George M. Kluchnik 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Premed 



Maryanne Knasas 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Tanja Knust 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Megan Keddy 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Casey Kokos 

School of Management 
Finance 



Ann-Marie Koss 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Brian D. Kostka 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Senior 373 




^ k<is>z art tAc tlputs to remember/ 
'ctiPtse tAcy i/yntt not ta&t forever, 

— w% ^^^( 



374 Seniors 












i 


1- 








^ 


m 


fv 


mi 




«-v lUf 




■* 


k 



Seniors 375 





Stephanie Koufos 

Arts & Sciences 
Human Development 



Craig Kowalski 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kevin Kraft 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kory Kramer 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

English 



Daniel M. Krause 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

International Studies 



Maren E. Krebsbach 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Communication 



Dean Koutroupas 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Katherine Kozack 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Tara Krissik 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Jennifer Kugel 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Michelle Kung 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Christopher Kurtz 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Haemin Kwan 

School of Education 
Early Childhood Education 



Karen Kwiatanowski 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



376 Seniors 




Daniel Lacz 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Elizabeth Lafalce 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



IvanaLagana 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



UttkarshLal 

School of Management 

Finance 

Computer Science 



i \ 

KimberlyJ. Lam 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Studio Art 




Lee G. Lam 

School of Management 
Finance 



Maura C. Lamadore 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Education 



Alexis Lambros 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 
Philosophy 



Elizabeth Lancaster 

School of Education 

Elementary & Special 

Education 



Erin M. Landry 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
French 




Jo-Anne Landry 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jonathan P. Lang 

School og Management 
Accounting 




Jessica Lantos 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 
Economics 



Michelle Lapworth 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Seniors 377 



k 




Joseph A. Larocque 

School of Management 
Finance 



Timothy Lawler 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Leah Larson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Matthew J. Larson 

School of Management 
General Management 
Information Systems 



Michael A. Latona 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Nefertiti V. Lawrence 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Lucia Lazar 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Nguyet Le 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Clifford Laurent 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Colleen C. Leary 

Arts & Sciences 





Melissa Leber 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



CathlynnM. Lee 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Brian Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 
Philosophy 




Frances Lee 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



378 Seniors 




Jacob L. Lee 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Janet Lee 

School of Management 
Finance 




Kathryn Lefebvre 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Lori A. Lefevre 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 
Political Science 





Katherine P. Legge 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jacqueline Lemaitre 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Alan M. Leon 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Andrew J. Leone 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michael Leone 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Lori A. Leonovicz 

School of Education 

Education 

Spanish 



George Leuchs 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Alexia Leventis 

Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 

English 



Gregory Levy 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Joshua A. Lewin 

Arts &C Sciences 
Political Science 



Seniors 379 




Seniors 381 




prjc i^ko Ans a tkon&ilnA iriinAs, 

A^S not a friend to Sfj^re. 

^mcrsOH 



382 Seniors 




Paul D. Lewis 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Michael Licata 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Evan R. Lichtenfels 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Sean Lim 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Kris R. Lincoln 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Jeremy M. Lipman 


Jason Lo 


Benjamin Lockhart 


Mike Lombardo 


Robert C. Lombard, Jr. 


C 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


\ 


English 


Accounting 


Political Science 


Psychology 


Nursing 






Christina Lombillo 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Juan Lopera 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Joseph Lorman 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



James F.Lorusso 

School Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Jessica C. Lowney 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Ba D. Lu 

School of Management 
Finance 

MIS 



Caroline Luciano 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Gary Luck 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




John Luddy 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Lisa Ludwig 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Heather M. Lueke 

Arts & Sciences 
Enghsh 



Caroline C. Lundquist 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Environmental Studies 



Brian T. Lynch 

School of Management 
MIS 



Tara K. Lynch 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jeffrey M. Lyons 

School of Management 

Management 

Marketing 



Melissa Mabey 

School of Management 
Human Resources 



Akindeji Mabogunje 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Christopher Lynch 

School of Management 
Economics 
Marketing 




Bryan Macavoy 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Seniors 385 



Elizabeth M MacDonald 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Todd E. Macey 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketin 



Thomas MacKinnon 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Lauren C. MacMahan 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Michael R. MacMillan 

School of Management 
Accounting 




SciuK)' if I Vnagement 
Human Resources Mgnt 



Erin L. Magee 

School of education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Rebekah M. Maginnis 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Jessica Magley 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Ja'NetMagras 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



386 Seniors 




Jeffrey Mahoney 

School of Management 

Accoutning 

Finance 



Theresa Maich 

School of Management 



AmyMainelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Birdget Majeski 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Olivia Maldonado 

Arts & Sciences 




Jason Malecki 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Regina Malhotra 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Matthew J. Mallen 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Marketing 



Christina Mallet 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Christina Malloy 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Lisa M. Malnick 

Arts & Sciences 



Susan A. Maloney 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jennifer Malpeso 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Eric D. Malzone 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Erin Manahan 

Alts &C Sciences 

English 




Susan Manchester 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Constan tines Maniatis 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kevin J. Manning 

School of Management 



Luigi Marandola 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 
Economics 



Stephen P. Marantette 

School of Management 
General Management 



Senior 387 





Jason Merchant 

Arcs & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Laura Marchisi 

Arts & Sciences 

EngHsh 

Philosophy 




Nathalie A. Marie 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



AmyMarose 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Joe Martell 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Cassandra L. Martin 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Sarah E. Martin 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Joshua Marmol 

Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

History 




Joshua E. Matineau 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Alexai '. Marze 

School oi oragement 

Information Systems 



Brian W.Masie 

School ot Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Matthew L. Masone 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Daniel M. Massey 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Lani L. Masso 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



C 



388 Seniors 



Christopher J. Masters 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Marc Mastronardi 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jenny Mathisrud 

School of Management 
Marketing 



RenitaMathur 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Allison Matthews 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Jacob P. Matthews 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Edith Maya 

Arts &C Sciences 
English 



Claire McCabe 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kelly Matthews 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Sarah Matthews 
School of Education 



Michael C. Maurer 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Jessica May 

School of Nursing 




Brian McAuley 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Jessica McCabe 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Seniors 389 




Cj^od ^Ives HS ot^T relatives/ thank 
^oA i/vi can ckoo&c OPiT friends. 



390 Seniors 




Seniors 391 



Cara McCafferty 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



Carroll McCaffrey 

Arts & Sciences 



John McCann 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jeffrey C. McCarthy 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Brian P. McCarty 

School of Education 

Education 

Mathematics 




Patrick McCavanagh 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Matthew R. McLean 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 



Jeffrey McClure 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Megan R. McClure 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Karen M. McConnell 

Arts & Sciences 
English 





Heather McCormack 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Ryan McCourt 

School of Management 
Finance 




Meg McCreedon 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Daniel D. McCulloch 

School of Management 
Marketing 



392 Seniors 



i 




Kerri A. McCullough 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Eileen McDermott 

Arts & Sciences 
French 




Brian W. McDevitt 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Keith J. McDonald 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Lyssa McDonald 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Michael T. McDonald 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Colleen F. McGee 

School of Manaeemetn 



Elizabeth R. McGovern 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources 



Thomas P. McGovern 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




John L. McGowan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Sean M. McGowan 

School of Management 
General Management 



Shannon McG ratty 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jeannine McGregor 

Advancing Studies 
Nursing 



John McGrory 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Seniors 393 




K ^4H^Ater Is tAe UcfS<ist Al&tdnci 
^ctiyvcen ttv-o people 



Seniors 394 




Seniors 395 




396 Seniors 




yon urt In tAc A^rk 




Seniors 397 



0* 






*f ^? \ 



• s 



4^ 



t 







^'f 






f» *« 



r« 



.^r<^ 









■W*^ •• 





^im not 4^mlA 0^ storms ^or J am 
ledTnln^ to sM tuy s^lp. 
SjOpusH 7^/fy ^ Uott 



400 Seniors 




Seniors 401 




Seniors 402 




Seniors 403 



Courtney E. McGuinness 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Marie McHale 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Joseph McHugh 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



David Mclntyre 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kierra L. McKeon 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Matthew McKinley 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Andrew P. McLaughlin 

School of Marketing 
Marketing 



Eryn McLaughlin 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Maureen C. McLaughlin 

School of Education 
Human Devlopment 



Sean McLaughlin 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Patrick T. McMahon 

Arts &C Sciences 
History 



Robert McMullen 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kerri McKenna 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Marie McLaughlin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
History 




Matthew McNulty 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 




Jeffrey b. McPeek 

School of Management 

Finance 



Elizabeth McPheeters 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Molly McShane 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Heather McSweeney 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Jennifer McSweeney 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



404 Seniors 




Jenny E. Mead 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



KimberlyA. Mello 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Laura Medice 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Joseph H. Medved 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kendra Medville 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jessica M. Mejia 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 




Christopher Mellor 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Andrew Mercieri 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Stephen V. Meringola 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Christopher F. Merrill 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Seniors 405 




Richard R. Metz 

School of Management 
Mathematics 
Management 



Janet E. Metzger 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Anne Mewhinney 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



ChadwickT. Meyer 

School of Management 

Information Systems 



Michael Michaud 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Economics 



406 S. 




Jennifer S. Mikucki 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Spanish 



Rebecca E. Miller 

Arts & Sciences 

French 
Political Science 



Shannon Miller 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 

Moderate Special Needs 



Christopher J. Millette 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Darline Milliance 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Melissa L. Millora 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kelly Milward 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Katherine A. Minahan 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Amy Minella 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Emily Milligan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Sarah Miner 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Patrick J. Minihane 

School of Management 

Finance 
General Management 



Tamara L. Minikus 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Scott Miniter 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Political Science 



Michael E. Mirabella 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Richard J. Miscioscia 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Genevieve Missirlian 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Sociology 



Maia Misura 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Eustace W. Mita 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Melissa A. Mirabile 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Julie Mitchelson 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Senior 407 





Neeka Mittal 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketin 



Joshua Moe 

School of Management 
Finance 




Jennifer Moisan 

School of Management 
Marketin: 



Michelle Mokaba 

Arts & Sciences 




Christine T. Molloy 

School of Nursing 


Justin Molloy 

School of Management 


Terrence Monagaa 

School of Management 


Kathryn Monahan 
School of Management 


Jennifer Mong 
School of Management 


St 


Nursing 


Marketing 


Marketing 


Finance 
French 


Accounting 


{In 




Alyssa M. Monks 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 



Christian N. Montemayor 

School of Management 

Finance 



Karen E. Montenegro 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Hispanic Studies 



Julie Montgomery 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Studio Art 



Elizabeth A. Moon 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



\ 



John T. Moore 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Paul L. Moore 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Tina L. Moore 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 



Melissa A. Morabito 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Robert J. Morgan 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 




Colleen Moriarty 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



David N. Morin 

School of Management 

Finance 



Dominick Mormile 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Sandra E. Morones 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 



Clara M. Morris 

Arts & Sciences 
Geophysics 




Sherih Morrison 
School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Rachel Morrissey 

School of education 

Elementary Education 

History 




Jennifer Motto 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Barry A. Motz 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Seniors 409 




Jt Is better to i^c A^ppy Ur a 

^mpit"^ tkdn to CIV'S, a ton^ tlpHC 
^nA {f-c ^OTcA M the t^f-AlU. 



410 Seniors 



Joann Moule 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Julie Moxon 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Lisa Mucci 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kimberly Mucha 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Terrianne Muezen 

Arts & Sciences 
PoUtical Science 




Kaitlin Mulcahy 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Mark Mulcahy 

School of Education 
Human Devlopment 



Karen L. Muldoon 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kelly Muldoon 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 



Mary Mulhearn 

Arts &C Sciences 
Philosophy 





MatthewJ. Mulhern 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Mark F. Mullek 

School of Management 
Finance 




Jennifer Mullen 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology 



Kerri M. Munzert 

School of Management 
Finance 



412 Seniors 




Nozomi Murakami 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Alison J. Murphy 

School of Education 

English 
Human Development 



Charles A. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 



Christina Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Psychology 



Corin R. Murphy 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Doug Murphy 

School of Management 

Finance 

Computer Science 



Elizabeth R. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Heather J. Murphy 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Michael Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Theology 




TraceyM. Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Sociology 



Brendan T. Murray 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Brian Murray 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Danielle Murray 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

English 



Gregory F. Murray 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Seniors 413 



Jennifer Murray 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



David J. Myers 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater Arts 



Sandra Nagy 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Kate Murray 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michael Muscarella 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jennifer Muscia 

School of Education 

Education 

English 



Anglea D. Myers 

School of Management 
Finance 




Jake D. Myers 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Robin P. Myles 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Psychology 



Jennifer L. Myron 

School of Management 
Marketing Psychology 



Geoffrey Myrus 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 




Ronald A. Nahass Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 

Music 

Theater Arts 



Sudhir Nair 

School of Management 

Finance 

MIS 



Grant Nakagawa 

School of Management 

Accounting 
Information Stystems 



Duane Naquin 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 




Melissa Naseila 

Arts &c Sciences 
Histoiy 



Jessica M. Natale 

Arts & Sciences 

Russian 



Lisa E. Nazar 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Rebecca Nealis 
School of Management 
Human Resources Mgnt 



Laura K Needhan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



414 Seniors 



James Neely 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Lori M. Nehls 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology English 



Eric A. Nelson 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Nicole Nelson 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Toia Nelson 

Arts &C Sciences 
Psychology 




WiUiam T. Nest 

School of Management 

Finance 

MIS 




Mary E. Newman 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 





Huan Nguyen 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Mary T. Nguyen 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Special Education 



Sarah K. Nicoletta 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Patrick Niedermeier 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

English 



Jessica Nielsen 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Seniors 415 



y/yAcH c^m deer o^ A^pplmss 

ctous>/ dnothdr opCHS/ ^nt oUcn c^e 

took so ton^ at tki ctouA Aoor tkat 

we do not see the one i^AlcA kas {f^een 

opened hr ns. 

}-feUn T^eUer 




416 Seniors 





Seniors 417 




living ^lit tka IdPi^kttr dnA 
love 0^ ^TtenAs. 



Seniors 4 1 




Seniors 419 




Brian Nigborowicz 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Megan E. Nizio 

Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Ryan K. Nobriga 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Christopher D. Nogiec 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 



Elizabeth Nolan 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Educatioj 




Leanna Norton 
Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Francis Nostrame 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

MIS 



Diana Novillo 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Joy Nowak 
School of Education 



William Nowak 
Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



420 Se 




Andrew O'Brien 
Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Brendon W. O'Brien 
Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 



Erin O'Brien 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



James T. O'Brien 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



KarenE.O'Brien 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Special Education 




Kathleen O'Brien 
School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Michael O'Brien 
Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Susan M. O'Brien 

School of Mangement 

Marketing 



Michael O'Brien III 

School of Management 

Operations & Strategic 

Mgnt 



Joseph C. O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 

English 




Ellen H. O'Donnell 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Lauren 1-. ( )'l '•oiincll 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Joan M. O'Grady 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Betherin O'Hare 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



Matthew R. O'Keefe 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 




Brian D. O'Leary 

Arts & Sciences 

History 



Dacey O'Leary 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Karen O'Leary 
School of Management 



Matthew M. O'Leary 

School of Management 

Finance 



Jack O'Malley 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Senior 421 





Brian E. O'Reilly 

Advancing Studies 
Economics 



Caitlin O'Reilly 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Patrick R. O'Rourke 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kelly H.O'Meara 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



James O'Neill 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Gerald O'Shea 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Erin O'Neil 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Carrie A. O'Regan 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Olubunmi M. Oguntol I 
Arts &C Sciences I 




Carlos G. Olivares 

School of Management 
Finance 



422 Seniors 



Neil W. Oliwa 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Charles A. Omage 

School of Management 



Joanna Ortbals 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Emily A. Ostiguy 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Christopher Ostuni 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Cari K. Ota 

School of Education 

Education 

History 



Michele K. Owens 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 



Zeynep Ozkan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Colin M. Padgett 

Arts & Sciences 
Hisotry 
English 




Scott M.Padlick 

School of Management 
Finance 



Peter J. Paganessi 

School of Management 

Finance 

Operations 



Maria-Christina Palaganas 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Frederick A. Palascakjr. 

School of Education 

Education 

Mathematics 



Augustus Palaza 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Damian Paletta 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Karen L. Palmer 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Alan Pan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Effie Panagopoulos 

Arts & Sciences 
French 




Seniors 423 




i^kdt lies ^MnA yoK Is mtAm^ 

copHp^rcA to i^kat Cits 

PvlMn yon.. 

PinhnOVvn 



424 Seniors 




4,2 s 




Seniors 427 



Lauren R. Pandolfe 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Brian Parnell 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



428 Seniors 



Yun Pang 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Maria Papaadopoulous-Pedr 

Arts & Sciences 
Romance Languages 



Bindi Parekh 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Susan Park 

School of Management 
Finance 




Timothy Partridge 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Rita Pasqualone 

Advancing Studies 
business Administration 




Rebecca Pasquesi 

School of Management 
Finance 



ReenaM. Patel 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Mary Patten 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 



RakheeV. Patel 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Justin B. Patnode 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Bradley Patten 

Arts & Sciences 
Russian 






Margaret IV arson 

Arts & Sciencci 
Theater 
English 



Mary A. Pepe 

Arts & Sciences 
Enghsh 



lason I Pedesson 

School ot Management 

Management 

Finance 



Keri Peevler 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Andrew}. Pena 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Management 



Melida Pena 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 
Hispanic Studies 




Robert Pereless 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Robert J. Pernioca 

School of Management 
General Management 



Cynthia Perry 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kenneth Peschier 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Political Science 



429 



Mark Peters 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Lynn A. Peyser 

Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



Christopher J. Peterson 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Elizabeth Peterson 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Science 



Zahir Petiwalla 
School of Management 



Mina M. Peuva 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Computer Science 




Shilpa Phadke 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Patrick A. Phelts 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Vincent Phillips 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Pinyot Pibulsonggram 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Nicholas]. Pierandr 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Margaret A. Pilic 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



430 Seniors 



Kimberly Pierce 

School of Education 

Education 

Mathematics 



Jessica Pignataro 

School of Education 

Education 

English 



Elizabeth Pike 

School of Education 

Intensive Special Needs 



Matthew Pike 
Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 




Dina Pimeniei 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Drew M Pinkin 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Melissa Pino 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Robyn Piontek 

School od Education 

Elementary Education 

Mathematics 




Justin Piper 
School of Management 
Operations Management 



Elizzabeth Pizzorno 

School of Mangemetnt 

Marketing 



Christy Plotner 
School of Management 
Human Development 



James P. Polechronis 

School of Management 

Finance 



Anthony Pollack 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Elizabeth Prasas 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Sarah Preston 

Arts & Sciences 

History 



Douglas A. Price 

School of Management 

Finance 



Samuel Price 

Arts & Sciences 

Independent 



Alison J. Prince 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Seniors 431 




l^ Ac Hti^st ^c^ntHnl Mn^s In tAls 
i^ortA cannot {^n seen or tOPtcAcA/ tAey 
an Utt ^y the Anman Acart. 
yitUn -^ztUr 



432 Seniors 




Seniors 433 




J tkmk i/vActcvcT yon, ^o ^tcowits> <i 



434 Seniors 




Seniors 435 



Cameron Proctor 
Arts & Sciences 



Kristin S. Proude 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Robin Puccio 
School of Education 



Rachel E. Quebec 
School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Erin Quinn 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 





Michael H. Quinn 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 




Christian T. Racine 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Raymond Rafferty 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Akbar Rahman 

Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Stephen P. Raia 
Arts &C Sciences 
Communications 



Bryann Rail 

Arts &C Sciences 

English 



Claire E. Ramich 

Arts & Sciences 

Psycholgoy 



436 Se 




i 



Leah M. Ramirez 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Joy Ramsbotham 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Jolynn Rana 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Management 



Jill C. Randall 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Special Education 



Jennifer E. Raterman 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Kristina M. Reader 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Jessica Reale 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Patrick B. Reddy 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Adele R. Reed 
Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Allison L. Reed 

School of Management 

Human Resources Mgt. 

Psychology 




Christine Reeder 

Arts & Sciences 

Human Development 



Todd Regan 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Economics 



James Reichert 

Arts & Sciences 

History 



Sharon Reidy 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Ed. 

History 



Eileen R. ReiUy 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Noreen Reilly 

school of Management 

Marketing 



Seth R. Renells 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Mark C. Renz 

School of Management 

Finance 



Joseph R. Reopel 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

History 



Lorie Resenders 
School of Nursing 



Senior 437 




Paul G. Rice 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

English 



Matthew Jonathan Richard Dena M Richardson 




Michael Revelli 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Christiana P. Reynolds 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Gene C. Richter 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Brian M. Rigert 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 



Allison Riley 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Amy J. Riley 

School of education 
Early Childhood Education 



Briana L. Riley 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



438 Seniors 



Jaime C. de los Reyes 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Jennifer Rezendes 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Gretchen E. Riddel]| 

Arts & Sciences | 
Mathematics ' 




Gint Rimas 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Stephanie Rinaldo 

Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 

Mathematics 



Lena Rivera 

School of Management 
Marlcetine 



Mary C. Ring 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Stephan Raia 



Eric Rios 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Sociology 



Roaida Rizkallah 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kevin Robbins 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Seth Robbins 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Sean Ritter 

School of Management 
Finance 




Jeffrey W. Roberts 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Jennifer Robinson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Ryan Robinson 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 





439 



Raul O. Rodriguez 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Rosa M. Rodriguez 

School of Management 

Human Resources 

Marketing 



Sara Rodriguez 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Ernest Rodulfo 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kate Regan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Ian S. Rogers 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 



Garrett Roll 

School of Management 
Finance 



AdrewJ. RoIIauer 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kerry Romano 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Special Education 



Sarah E. Rooney 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




440 Seniors 




Michelle Rosatto 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Management 



Amy Rose 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Edward Rosbeck 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Gregory Ross 

School of Management 
Information Systems 



Elizabeth A. Rosevear 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Micahel L. Ross 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 




Heather E. Rossetti 

Advancing Studies 
Social Science 



Steve Rossetti 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Alberto Rossi 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Sharon Rossi 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Kristin Rowell 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Elizabeth C. Royds 



Emily S. Rueb 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Elizabeth Ruel 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Seniors 441 



Nicole M. Ruffo 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Leah Ruscuitto 

Arts &C Sciences 
Biology 



Michael A. Russo 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Robert Russo 

Arts &C Sciences 
Mathematics 



Daniel Rystrom 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Shelby A. Saad 



Wade E. Saadi Jr. 

School of Education 

Marketing 
Information Systems 



Jacyln Sabatino 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Marielle Sack 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Christine Friet 

Arts & Sciences 
Geophysics 




Adrienne A. Sage 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Romelia Salazar 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Lonny J. Saldivar 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Stacey Salko 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Pedro Sanchez-Mejorada 

School of Management j 
Finance 




Katherine M. Sandman 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Christopher E. Sanetti 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Sociology 



Anthony Sansevero 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kristen M. Santillo 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Thomas Santora 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



442 Seniors 



Stacy Santos 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 



Jackie T. Sanzari 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Eduardo Sardina 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Makiko Satoh 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Rebecca A. Savage 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




IVIary Catherine Savard 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Elizabeth Sayers 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 





Darien K. Scagliotti 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Eddie Scannel 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael P. Scarlata 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Carolyn Scarola 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Education 



Leonard A. Scarola 

School of Management 
General Management 



443 



444 




^ 



A^tAct to hup ^nA 
ImfjossMe to ^or^ct. 




Christian Schaeffer 



Rebecca Schrader 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



George J. Schaeffer III 

School of Management 

Marketing 

MIS 



Laryn M Schimpf 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Tina Schipani 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Erika M. SchJomer 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Kelly M. Schraufnagel 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kevin Schuler 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Michael A. Scialabba 

School of Management 
Finance 



Lori Scott 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



446 Se 



Megan Scott 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Paul Scotto 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Danielle Scrivani 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Maired Scully 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Steven Sechko 

School of Management 
Finance 




Francina Sebrefia 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Ann Selzer 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Special Education 



Tricia Segree 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Margaret Segretti 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Economics 



Jamie L. Seguin 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Psychology 



Philip S. Seng 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Yohan Sengamalay 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Ajay Sequeira 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Mark Sekula 

School of Management 
Acocunting 




Michael Serafino 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Jonathan Sevigney 

Arts &C Sciences 
Psychology 



Nicholas T. Seyfried 

Arts &: Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Kerri Seymour 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Joey Shanley 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Megan D. Shaughnessy 



Senior 447 





Danielle N. Shea 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



StephanJ. Shea 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 




Michael D. Sheehan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Michael J. Sheehan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Judy A. Sheedy 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



XihongShen 

Advancing Studies 

MIS 

Accounting 



Liberty A. Shepard 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Nicole L. Sherrin 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Bridget E. Sherry 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 




Katie C. Shields 


JihoonShin 


Sarah M. Shiple 


Erin M. Shipee 


Chelsea J. Shofner 


Arts &C Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


English 


History 
Sociology 


Physics 


Human Development 


Elementary Education 
Human Development 



448 Se 




Christopher D. Shore 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Kirsten Shrout 

School of Management 
Marlceting 



AllysonM.Shuler 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michael Siciliano 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Christine A. Siegel 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Jeffrey T. Sieglen 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Chemistry 



Mark Sieminski 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



JeffreySikaitis 

Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Kerin A. Sikorski 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Kelly A. Silva 



Rick Silva 

School of Management 
MTnasicnunt 



Fernando A. Silva 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 




Cathryn C. Simard 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

French 



Deborah Simmons 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Psychology 




Seniors 449 




^ Ac secret U tHc Is enhmn^ ike 
(passage 0^ time. 



Seniors 450 




Seniors 451 




'^dtpk V^titAo ^merson 





Wendy M. Simon 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Garrett P. Simulcik Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Sean Sinclair 

Arts & Sciences 
history 



AmySionfield 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



i 



Joseph Sista 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Paul Siu 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



James Skinner 

School of management 
Marketing 



Katharine Skirius 

School of Managemem 
Economics 



Kevin Slater 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Kevin R. Small 

Arts & Sciences 
English 





^*4 


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Anna D. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 



Asania Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Brian A. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 

History 



Felicity Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



454 Seniors 



^. 



Ir 




Joshua D. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy- 



Matthew Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Robert A. Smith 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Rubert Smith 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Stephanie Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Theodore J. Smith Jr 

School of Managment 

Finance 

Marketin: 




Jaime T. Snarski 

Arts & Sciences 



LindsayJ. Sr 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Karen Solcz 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Marketing 




Jessica Sombat 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Neeia Sookdeo 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Connie L. Soroka 

School of Education 



Ruben Soto 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 
Hispanic Studies 



Claire Sousa 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 



I 455 



Gregory E. Southall 
Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communication 



Sarah L. Spahn 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Nicole K. Sparacino 

School of Management 

MIS 



Kathryn Spates 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



James Spillman 



Katherine M. Spirito 
Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Emily K. Spitser 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Chris Spoelberch 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



James D. Spaziante 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 




Roger N. Squire III 

School of Management 

Finance 




Karen L Stafford 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jeff Stamp 

Arts & Sciences 

History 



Dustin Stamper 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Lynn Staubly 

School of Education 

Mathematics 

Educations 



Sarah W. Steckroth 
School of Education 

Special Education 
Elementary Education 



Samantha Stee 
Arts & Sciences 
Communication 



Anthony Steele 

School ot Management 

MIS 



Whitney B. Steele 
School of Management 



Matthew Q. Stautbe 
Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Maria J. Stephan 
Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



456 Seniors 




\ 



i 



Karen Stevens 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Natlian SLevens 

Arts & Sciences 

Geology 



Victoria Stevens 

Arts & Sciences 

French 

Economics 



Shayla Stewart 

Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 



Michael Stolarz 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Information Systems 




Gloria Stone 

School of Management 

Marketing 

International Studies 




Sarah E. Stout 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 





SarahStone 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Jonathan Straub 

School of Management 

Finance 



Jennifer M. Stubbs 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Keri Stucenski 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Christina Suh 
School of Management 
Human Resource Mgnt. 



Meredith Sulcer 
Arts & Sciences 



Michael Suleta 

School of Management 

Finance 

MIS 



Seniors 457 



Andrew C. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Psychology 



Brian J. Sullivan 

School of Management 
Finance 



Caitlin Sulivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Conor S. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Elizabeth Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Psychology 




Jonathan S. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 




Kara Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Hero Sultando 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Information Systems 




Marybeth Susarchick 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Neil Sutton 

Arts & Sciences 

History 



Kerri Svenning 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Daniel E. Swanstron II 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Kathryn Sweeney 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



458 Seniors 




Kelly Swiatek 

School of Management 
Economics 
Psychology 



Michelle A. Swissa 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Karen E. Symanowice 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Michael Szarowicz 

School of Management 



Sahil K. Tak 

School of Management 

Finance 

MIS 




Meredith L. Takahashi 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



William Taketa 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Andria H. Tamer 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Spanish 



SuryatyTanoto 

School of Management 
Finance 



Lindsay E. Taylor 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Matthew R. Taylor 

School of Management 
General Management 



Tessa Tayyab 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Philosophy 



Carlo L. Tebino 

School of Management 
Marketing 



BrendaTessel 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Reza Teymour 

School of Management 




Harjot I hakral 

Arts & Sciences 



Timothy Thein 

School of Management 



Matthew Thomas 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Cien C rhompson 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Stacey L. Thompson 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Senior 459 




IrlcnAsAlips. 'T^O tov-i dnA to ^t 

lovcA Is tAc ^rmtest 

k(i(pmncs,& 0^ chcisteytce. 



460 Seniors 





^C^o not Mtoi^ t^AcTC tkt ptitk 

PHiiy U^A. ^0 In&U^A i^Acre 
tAerc Is no (path anA Un-vc d tmll. 




462 Seniors 





Kali Thorne 

School of Education 

Psychology 
Elementary Education 



Anshu N. Tiku 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Philosophy 



Aine M. Timoney 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Peter Tinari 

Arts & Sciences 

Music 

Philosophy 



Jennifer Tine 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Ellen Titus 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 



PetrisiaTjitarum 

School of Management 

MIS 

Finance 

464 Seniors 



Karen Tlucek 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Amy Tobin 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Catherine Tobin 

School of Education 

Elemetary Education 

Special Education 



Jonathan Tice 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Andrew Tilli 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Erman Tjiputra 

School of Management 
Finance 




Katherine E. Tobin 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Kathleen A. Tobin 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Adam Toczylowski 

School of Management 
Finance 



Stephen Todorovich 

School of Management 
Economics 



Hillary Tompkins 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Richard C. Tonzoia 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Muhammad A. Toor 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Patrick C. Torbert 

Arts & Sciences 
Classics 



Marissa Torney 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Andres Torres 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



MatthewJ. Tortora 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Katherine Tortorello 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Amanda D. Tracy 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Tuan L. Tran 

School of Management 

Finance 

Management 



James Tremble 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Seniors 465 






Kevin Trimble 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Anita Trotta 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



FrantzT. Trouillot 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Alexis Troup 



School of Management 
Human Resources Mgt 



Karen Tsacalis 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Adrith Tsai 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Marketing 



Leslie Tsai 

School of Education 
Early Childhood Education 



Catherine Tucker 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Erin M. Tudor 

School of Management 
Operations 



Kristen Turick 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




466 Seniors 




Eileen Turo 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 



David P. Twomey 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jeffrey P. Uhas 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Julie-Ann van Dorn 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Sociology 



SumayaTwal 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 




Yusuke Uetani 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 









^^^^'^v ^^^^H 




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H^^^^l^^^^^HI 



James Ullrich 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Larissa Urcia 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Alexander Van Der Ven 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Joshua Vadala 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 




Allison van Fleet 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Ryan T. Van Geons 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Theology 



Christina L. VanVorst 

School of Management 
Marketing 



MatthewJ. Van Kirk 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Seniors 467 



John A. Vassallo 

Arts & Sciences 
Environomental Science 



Nicholas P. Vegliante 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Joseph D. Venezia 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Cara M. Veneziano 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Brian Veprek 

Arts & Sciences 
Theater 




Edwin Vi 11 afane 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Peggy Villalba 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Gina P. Villamar 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Marcus Villanueva 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Karen Villazor 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



468 Se 




TaraVilling 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Thomas J. Villiotte 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Nicole Vince 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Joshua L. Viney 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 



Thomas Viscardi 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 




lyan Vogt-Lowell 


Vivian M. Vogt-Lowell 


Kyle Volk 


Craig Vollono 


Thomas Anthony Voltero Jr 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Marketing 


History 


Communications 


Political Science 




Christina L. Vorst 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Heather Wade 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jennifer A. Wade 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Caryn Waechter 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jeffrey Waldron 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Benjamin C. Wallace 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael Walsh 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Michael J. Walsh Jr 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



No Photo 
Available 



Alecia Walters 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Danielle S.Walther 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Senior 469 




470 Seniors 



l^ lit 1^1 UnA Tit 

ioY^d ... InvUvc m,e 

an A Tti unAtrstdnA. 




Seniors 471 




^ ktre. Is so PHPick more to sec 

i^Ay stay ^cAlnA wAcH yon contA 

^0 on i^ltA PHC^ 



A72 Seniors 



X 



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474 Senior 



J knot^!- It t^^s 

Aont knovv Aovv 7 
AiA it, 
Jijdpitincc Silver 




Seniors 475 



v 

Janet L. Wang 

School of Management 
Finance 
Market: 




ReginaWarga 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Brandon Warner 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Jennifer R. Warren 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kelly L. Warren 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Emily J. Warrender 

School of Management 

Finance 

Human Resources 



Melissa Wehr 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Traciann Watanabe 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jodi Matchmaker 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Corey H. Watlington 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Laura Webby 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 




Scott A. Weigman 

School of Management 
MIS 



Tracy Weiner 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Margaret E. Weisenberger 



School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Trisha L. Weiss 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Peter C.Welch 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



476 Seniors 



Jeremy Wells 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jennifer M.Welsh 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Michael J. Welsh 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Computer Science 



Eric J. Werthmann 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



v^J L. 



Alyson Wetter 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jonathan Wheaton 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jacob A. Wheeler 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Julie Wheeler 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Laurie Whelan 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Lisa Whelan 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Matthew S. Whitbread 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 






Mark A. Whipple 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Jared White 

School of Management 
Finance 




Jeffrey B.White 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Samuel F. WhoUey 

School of Management 
Information Systems 



Kathleen A. Wicknian 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources Mgmt. 



Catherine Wiecher 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



James Wiegand 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Seniors 477 



SaraWierzbicki 

Arts & Sciences 
Biological Psychology 



Jonna T.Willis 

Advancing Studies 
English 



478 Seniors 



Shannon Wild 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Special Needs 



John T. Wildfire 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Information Systems 



Bethanne Wilding 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



JulieA.Wilfong 

School of Management 
Human Resource Mgnt. 




Kelly Wilson 

Arts & Sciences 

English 



Sahara Wilson 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Law 



Jessica Wiltz 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



TaraWistanley 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



A 



Whitney Wise 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Steven Wisnor 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



DeniseWojcik 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Christine Wojie 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michael Wong 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Sonja M. Wong 

Arts & Sciences 
Hispanic Studies 



Jeffrey A. Wright 

School of Management 
Finance 



Nicole J. Woods 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 
Political Science 



Curtis Woodworth 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Thomas T. Worboys 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Linnsey Workman 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Natalie M. Wright 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



James Wu 

School of Management 
Finance 



KentWu 

School of Management 
Finance 



Brian Wyatt 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Matthew J. Wyneski 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michael Wysocki 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Christopher P. Xeller 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Dena Xifaras 

School of Management 
General Management 



Sunny Xu 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Psychology 



Senior 479 




Sophia Yen 

School of Management 

Finance 

MIS 



Quinby Yost 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Lori A. Young 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Joy Yamamura 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Music 



Tricia A. Yarger 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michael Young 

Arts & Sciences 
Italian Literature 



Wen-Ting Yang 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Cathie Ye 

School of Management ™ 
Finance 




William R. Young 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Craig Youngren 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Jeremy A. Yuenger 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Edward G. Zacharias 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Katrina Zai 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources 



Christopher V. Zakak 

School of Management 
Finance 



480 Seniors 



Emiley Zalesky 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Christina Zampardi 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Christine Zanchi 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Ann N. Zarzycki 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Samira Zebian 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Economics 




Ryan M. Zenga 

School of Management 
Finance 



Meredith Zinman 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Laurel E. Zinn 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



John Zissler 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kristine Zizic 

School of Education 
Human Development 




Manvel Zubiria 

School of Management 
Finance 



Marcos Zubrycki 

School of Management 

History 

Accounting 




Thomas J. Zubauskas 

School of Mangement 
Accounting 



Elizabeth A. Zurla 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 




Seniors 481 



Jeni Brown 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Jason Crawford 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Robert Espinosa 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Daniel Gonzalez 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Patrick M. Gray Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 




Ayesha N. Hackman 
School of Education 

English 
Secondary Education 



No Photo 
Available 



Kinu Hatano 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Maura A. Hogan 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Film 



Euyoung Jenny Kim 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



Mark A. Lawthorne 

Advancing Studies 
Political Science 





Monica Lissade 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Human Development 



LaniMasso 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Clarence A. Perera 

School of Management 
Finance 

MIS 



Keith A. Raymond 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



482 Seniors 




Seniors 483 







484 Scnioi 




Seniors 485 




nA H J ktlA the ckoict, J^A ^tt^H^S 
i^dnt to ^d tkire. 'T^Aosc cverc tki ^cst 



486 Seniors 




Seniors 487 




e i^ko kas, a tkofiS^nA IrlcnAs 
AdS nCft d itunA to sp^TC, 



488 Seniors 




Seniors 489 



99 Things to Do 



1. Tut a penny on the T tracks 

Z. Eat fish at Cower 

3. Visit theTVorth End 

4. Take a nap in O'JsleiU 

5. 'Watch the sunrise from the Comm. Ave. garage 

6. TDip a part of your body in the Reservoir 

7. J^eturn your library books 

8. Get lost in McElroy 



9. bleep until 4 p.m. on a weekday 

10. Visit the Alumni Stadium bubble 

11. Get a job (any one will do) 

IZ. Buy a "BC alumnf sticker for your car 

13. Eat Stuart Cat e 7^ it e 

14. ^ide the B Cine to Cechmere 

15. Drink from a glass at ^ary Ann's 

16. Attend a 99 day party 

17. Use the stairs to get main campus 

IS. figure out the "order" in the JUods 

19. Go to the top of the Trudential Building 

ZO. Jiave a barbeque 

Zl. Ask a question in class 

ZZ. finish your resume 

Z3. Do everything on your resume 

Z4. Get a degree audit 

Z5. J^ide the last Comm. Ave bus on Saturday 

Z6. figure out every channel on BC Cable 

Z7. Beat your roommates at Tlaystation 

Z8. Go rollerblading on the Esplenade 

Z9. Take a day trip to Cape Cod 

30. J^un around campus 

31. Visit the woods ofj^ewton Campus 

3Z. Talk in Bapst 

33. Cearn the words to 4 Basfon 

34. Attend an on-campus performance 

35. Drive through the Big Dig 

36. Revisit your freshman dorm 

37. Throw sneakers on the shoe tree 




490 Seniors 



38. Actually sing at Ts Tub 

39. Go ice skating at frog Tond 

40. Tell your first hook-up that you really did care 

41. Go to the franklin Tark Zoo 

4Z. Eat at the restaurant at the MfA 

43. Take down the Christmas lights 

44. Stop and read one of the signs on campus 

45. Get the recipe for the Caesar dressing at the Eagles 7^ est 

46. Burn those incriminating Spring Break pictures 

47. Meet every senior 

48. Thank you favorite professor 

49. Tell off your worst professor 



zfore Graduation 



so. Bring the trays back to Cower 

SI. Burn your couch 

SZ. Do the walk of sham 

S3. Understand BC logic 

S4r. :K-un through the Mods naked as a jailbird 

SS. Go to the BC museum 

S6. yCnow the BC bus drivers by name 

S7. Invest in Moogy's stock 

SS. Create a new drink and name it atter yourself 

SP. Be an individualist on Thursday night 

60. Give peace a chance 

61. Make survivalist plans for Jslew Years ZOOO 

6Z. Go a week without counting calories 

63. ^ook-up sober 

64. Do an all-nighter playing cards 

6S. Swim at the Tlex 

66. Return the books from the past 4 years and get that $S.7S 

67. But a $S beer (don't forget to tip the bartender) 

68. Dance, a lot 

69. in 

70. Say "Til call you" and mean it 

71. See how many licks it takes to get to the center of a toot si e roll pop 

7Z. fondly reminisce about the Club at OConnell Jiouse 

73. Give to a point drive (don't Just say you did) 

74. Take the tunnel from JCostka to Gonzaga 

7S. Start with the Jiiggins dig and go all the way to China 

76. Jiook-up in the library 

77. Meet the ghost of O Connell 

78. Say good-bye to Che Che 

79. Get dressed up for class 

80. 'Wear sweatpants to a bar 

81. Swim in the Charles ^iver 
8Z. Thank your parents 

83. 'Eat a Big Burr it o 

84-. Cisten to late night 'WZBC 

8S. Call home just to say "hf 

86. Call home just to ask for money 

87. Meet Addle 

88. ^efer to the buildings by their original names 

89. Take a nap In 0"J\leill 

90. Borrow a BC bus to drop your friends off on upper 

91. Change the Gasson bells to farm animal sounds 

9Z. Check out the second door In the bathrooms ofjilggins 

93. find the tunnels under the Mods 

94. Go to Cheers 

9S. Xevlslt Who's 

96. Do something embarrassing and not care 

97. Sunbath on the Dustbowl 

98. Shop for groceries and housewares In the dinning halls 

99. Tarty like Its 1999 



Seniors 491 



Class of 1999 



492 S. 



Lamees Abdul-Karim 


Jason Crawford 


XXX 


MMM 


Cristina N. Abruzzese 


Meg Creedon 


XXXX 




Wendy A. Adam 


Derrick Crittenden 




Ryan Andreoli 


Kristin Ann Adamo 


Stefanie Crosier 


Kathryn C. Alexander 


XXX 


Maysaa Al-Adawi B 


Justin Cunningham 


XXXX 


XXXX 


Fahad M. Al-Falah 


Regine Cuvilly 


XXXX 




Mai Al-Mutair 


Joanne Dasilva 




Kimberly Andreotta 


Ahmed F. Al-Saleh 


Anupama Dalta 


Jessica Aliberti 


XXXX 


Alexander J. Alvarez 


Bonnie Davis 


XXX 


XXXX 


Anne Marie Ambros 


Christina M. DeLima 


XXX 




Robert M. Amen 


Christopher DeSpoelberch 




Peter Andrews 


Daniel Archabal 


Andrew J. Bebernardo 


Gregory U. Almeida 


XXXX 


Sylvia Arias 


Sonia Decastro 


XXX 


XXXX 


Douglas Armbrust 


Erin Del LLano 


XXX 




Bryan Arndt 


Maria I. Dell'Oro 




Lauren E. Angelo 


Juan Arteaga 


Paul Denoly 


Jennifer A. Almeida 


XXXX 


Michelle Audrey 


Gregory Desharnis 


XXX 


XXXX 


Matthew Baldwin 


Myrline Desormeau 


XXX 




Colleen Banse 


Pavel Despot 




Marisa T. Annino 


William Barclay 


Correy Detwiller 


Sarah L. Almy 


XXXXX 


Rosa Barriga 


Stephen J. DiRico 


Art & Sciences 


XXXXX 


Peter J. Behmke 


Elizabeth Dial 


Political Science 




Jonathan Moise Berg 


Maria Dias 




James Anoitne 


Emily Berger 


Ljubomir Djurovic 


Joel Amico 


XXXXX 


Timothy Bilecki 


Donald Donnalson 


XXX 


XXXXX 


Marino Billini 


Colleen Dooley 


XXX 




Heather Bliven 


Jim Dovolis 




Cara Antonacci 


Christopher J. Bonelli 


Erin Dunphy 


Mark Amirault 


XXXXX 


Erwin E. Bonifacio 


An Duong 


XXX 


XXXX 


Janine Bouey 


Catherine Durkin 


XXX 




Alyinde Bourne 


Heather Duryea 




Sand Antonmattei 


Nathaniel Bo wen 


Alison Dwan 


Christian T. Amundsen 


XXXXX 


Meaghan Boyle 


Christina Eardley 


XXX 


XXXX 


Steven Brandwayn 


Ikay Enu 


XXX 




Ertha Brathwaite 


H. Robert Espinosa 




Chris Anzelletti 


John Bray 


Christine V. Faletra 


Melissa Amyelan 


XXXX 


Mark Broehm 


Elizabeth A. Fanous 


XXX 


XXXX 


Charles Brumskine 


Anthony Farrington 


XXX 




Brian Bruno 


Katherine M. Fitch 




Luz E. Arce 


Frank Turner Buford 


Steven Fitzgerald 


Stephanie Anastasia 


XXXX 


Kristin J. Cafasso 


Keisha Flanagan 


XXX 


XXXX 


Benjamin Careathers 


Kenneth Florian 


XXX 




Kendra Cargill 


Brian Fox 




David Appleyard 


Joshua A. Carroll 


Christian S. Frahm 


Elizabeth B. Anathan 


XXX 


Natalie Casey 


Alejandro V. Franch 


LLL 


XXX 


Teresa Cella 


Michele E. Furman 


AAA 




Anna Ceruelos 


Melinda Gallo 




Robert A. Arcoro 


Alexandre Chan 


Christopher Ganglofif 


Erin J. Andersen 


XXXX 


Dewin Chandra 


adley Alan 


SSS 


XXXXX 


Katherine Chang 


XXXX 


MMM 




Simone Cho 


XXX 




Michael Arguilla 


Jason Chou 




Heather M. Anderson 


XXXX 


Da-Woon Chung 


Jason Alberti 


SSS 


XXXX 


Jodi Cilley 


XXX 


MMM 




Jonathan C. Cleasby 


XXXX 




Melissa B. Argyelan 


John Cook 




Rachel Anderson 


XXXXX 


Paula Coutinho 


Jennifer Alden 


SSS 


XXXXX 


Megan E. Cowan 


XXX 


MMM 




"ijiierr P. Cowin 


XXX 




Patricia Armelin 


1 .iiferCoyle 




Tim Anderson 


XXXXX 


J'.iin Coyne 


Kimberly S. Alemian 


SSSS 


XXXXx 


eniois 









1 



Chelsa M. Arscott 
XXXXX 
XXXXX 

Renetta M. Ascher 
XXXXX 
XXXXX 

William B. Attwood 
XXX 
XXX 

Jason A. Aucoin 
XXXX 
XXXX 

Michael L. Auda 
XXXXX 
XXXXX 

Mark A. Audi 
XXXXX 
XXXXX 

Robert Aumiller 
XXXXX 
XXXXX 

Javier Avino 
XXXXX 
XXXXX 

Shawn T. Aylward 
XXXXX 
XXXXx 

Erin E. Babin 
XXXXX 
XXXXX 

Brian A. Babineau 

School of Management 

MMM 

Michael C. Babst 
XXXX 
XXXX 

Stuart C. Bachelder 
XXXX 
XXXX 

Jennifer Badann 
XXXX 
XXXX 

Mona A. Badawy 

Arts and Sciences 

mmmm 

Ariana Bahret 
XXXX 
XXXXX 

Jaime Bailey 
XXXX 



XXXX 

Laura L. Bailey 

Christian J. Baird 

Vandana Balachandar 

Nicholar R. Balaji 

Gregory D. Ball 

Joel Baptiste 

Christine Barakat 

Zeynak Barakat 

Gregory P. Barber Jr. 

Rafal Barczak 

Brian Barker 

Trey Barlow 

Tamika D. Barnes 

Christopher Barrett 

Brian M. Barrio 

Kunta K. Barros 

Johanna Barry 

Shannon Barry 

Kelly Bartlett 

Gregory D. Bartoli 

Manalie L. Baruah 

Stephen Barwiskowski 

School of Management 

MMM 

Paula L. Basco 

Robert A. Bateman 

Laura Batenic 

Erik Bator 

Brad Battaglia 

Alison Beals 

Meredith M. Beaton 

Michael Beattie 
William J. Beauchesne 

Sarah Becherer 

Art and Sciences 

mmm 

Jennifer L. Becker 

Amy Beckman 

Brian Belanich 

Christina Belaval 

Leah Belazarian 

DavidJ. Belford 

Janna 

Bell 

Kathryn Bems 

Kate Benoit 

Carolyn Berchoff 

Daniele M. Bergeron 

Regine Bergeson 

Adam Berry 

Roberth Berthiaume 

Yourajwaittei Bhairo 

Paul Bibbo 

Michael Biggan 

Amy L Bilics 

Adrianne K Billingham 

Cor Bilodeau 

Jill Binkley 

Brian N. Binkowski 

Alsion M. Bich 

Sarah Birch 
Shannon M. Bird 



Scott Birmingham 

Deidre Birnstiel 

William F. Biscegha 

Joel B. Biswas 

Ryan D. Bittman 

Brian Bittmann 

Sven Bjorkenstam 

Jennifer J Blakeslee 

School of Management 

Communications 

Marketing 

Frances Blanchette 

Karen H. Blanron 

Stephanie A. Blazewicz 

Kefryn Block 

Christine F. Boctor 

Heather L. Bogan 

Charles Boguslaski 

Michael Bohigian 

Erin P. Boles 

Matthew D. Bonacci 

Mattew Bonavita 

Allison C, Booth 

Kibib 

Borde-Nelson 

Julie A. Boris 

Angela Borzon 

Caroline A. Bosworth 

Lauren M Bosworth 

Jeanine Bouche 

Jennifer Boutin 

Christopher P. Bowler 

Noah S. Bowling 

Laura Boyd 

Jason Boyer 

Claire M Boyle 

Jennifer Boyle 

Moira B. Boyle 

Tara M. Bradley 

Marcos Bragado-Meana 

Patrick J. Brennan 

John D Breslin Jr. 

Patrick T. Bresonis 

Elwyn Brewster 

Nicole Brewster 

Caroline A. Breyley 

Jeffrey A. Bridge 

Jefifiner K. Briggs 

Elizabeth H. Brogan 

Kevin T. Brophy 

Dawn A. Brown 

Eileen B. Brown Elena Brown Gena 

M. Brown 

Matthew B. Brown 

Megan Brown 

Timothy A. Brown 

Wade A. Brown 

Norman Brown IV 

Erica M. Browne 

Kelly Bruno 

Allison Bruns 

Jennifer N. Bucci 

Tammy Buchan 

Brendon B. Buckley 

Daniel J. Buckley 

Anne Buckman 



Carol Buzik 
Christopher T. Bulens 

Michele Burderi 

Christopher J. Burke 

Daniel Burke 

William Q. Burke 

Jacqueline Burkhardt 

Matthew Burnell 

Megan Burns 

Bridget Burstein 

Steven W. Bussen 

Thomas Bustros 

Joseph Byer 

Patrick Byrne 

Sarah Byrnes 

CynthiaB. Cabral 

William J. Cadigan 

Alison Cahill 

Bridget Cahill 

George Cahill 

Richard Cahill 

Lee Calamis 

John J. Calcaterra 

Jennifer Callahan 

Sara Calncn 

Sar L. Camden 

Collette Cameron 

Aldred A. Caminos 

Hayley Cammeyer 

David Campbell 

Peter L. Campbell 

Sherice S. Campbell 

Lean Cannan 

Canh N. Cao 

Christopher M. Capozzi 

Michele A. Cardella 

John Cardillo 

Anothy Cardone 

Frederic P. Cardone 

Amy E. Carignan 

Robert M. Carley 

Matthew W. Carmell 

Collenn C. Carney 

Cathleen Carpenter 

Christopher Carr 

Mary K. Carr 

Sybil A. Carrade 

Yvonne Carrero 

Kerry A. Carroll 

Kevin Caruso 

Matt Casamassima 

Jaclyn Casey 

Sarah Casey 

David W. Cashman 

Patrick Cassidy 

Christina A. Cassis 

David Castagnetti 

Juliana Castelli 

Eric A. Cataldo 

Escel J. Catambay 

David Catrini 

Cherilyn D. Caufield 

Erin Caufield 

Mark-Anthony J. Cautela 

Joshua Cella 

Megan E. Cellitti 

Kate G. Cellucci 

Mettew Chabot 

Senic 



493 



Class of 1998 



494 Se 



Moustapha Abounashi 


Art & Sciences 


XXXX 




xxxxxxx 


Political Science 




Renetta M. Ascher 


xxxxxxx 




Lauren E. Angelo 


XXXXX 




Joel Amico 


XXXX 


XXXXX 


Nicko Abraham 


XXX 


XXXX 




XXXX 


XXX 




William B. Attwood 


XXXX 




Marisa T. Annino 


XXX 




Mark Amirault 


XXXXX 


XXX 


Loren Acker 


XXX 


XXXXX 




XXXX 


XXX 




Jason A. Aucoin 


XXXXX 




James Anoitne 


XXXX 




Christian T. Amundsen 


XXXXX 


XXXX 


Erin M. Ackerman 


XXX 


XXXXX 




XXXXXX 


XXX 




Michael L. Auda 


XXXX 




Cara Antonacci 


XXXXX 




Melissa Amyelan 


XXXXX 


XXXXX 


Caitlin Adams 


XXX 


XXXX 




XXX 


XXX 




Mark A. Audi 


XXXX 




Sand Antonmattei 


XXXXX 




Stephanie Anastasia 


XXXXX 


XXXXX 


Bradley Alan 


XXX 


XXXX 




XXXX 


XXX 




Robert Aumiller 


XXX 




Chris Anzelletti 


XXXXX 




Elizabeth B. Anathan 


XXXX 


XXXXX 


Jason Albert! 


LLL 


XXXX 




XXX 


AAA 




Javier Avino 


XXXX 




Luz E. Arce 


XXXXX 




Erin J. Andersen 


XXXX 


XXXXX 


Jennifer Alden 


SSS 


XXXX 




XXX 


MMM 




Shawn T. Aylward 


XXX 




David Appleyard 


XXXXX 




Heather M. Anderson 


XXX 


XXXXx 


Kimberly S. Alemian 


SSS 


XXX 




XXX 


MMM 




Erin E. Babin 


XXXX 




Robert A. Arcoro 


XXXXX 




Rachel Anderson 


XXXX 


XXXXX 


iCathryn C. Alexander 


SSS 


XXXXX 




XXXX 


MMM 




Brian A. Babineau 


XXXX 




Michael Arguilla 


School of Management 




Tim Anderson 


XXXX 


MMM 


Jessica Aliberti 


SSSS 


XXXX 




XXX 


MMM 




Michael C. Babst 


XXX 




Melissa B. Argyelan 


XXXX 




Ryan Andreoli 


XXXXX 


XXXX 


Gregory U. Almeida 


XXX 


XXXXX 




XXX 


XXXX 




Stuart C. Bachelder 


XXX 




Patricia Armelin 


XXXX 




Kimberly Andreotta 


XXXXX 


XXXX 


Jennifer A. Almeida 


XXXX 


XXXXx 




XXX 


XXXX 




Jennifer Badann 


XXX 




Chelsa M. Arscott 


XXXX 




Peter Andrews 


XXXXX 


XXXX 


;')ar;ili L. Almy 


XXXX 


XXXXX 





Mona A. Badawy 


Bell 


Arts and Sciences 


Kathryn Bems 


mmmm 


Kate Benoit 




Carolyn Berchoff 


Ariana Bahret 


Daniele M. Bergeron 


XXXX 


Regine Bergeson 


XXXXX 


Adam Berry 




Roberth Berthiaume 


Jaime Bailey 


Yourajwaittei Bhairo 


XXXX 


Paul Bibbo 


XXXX 


Michael Biggan 




Amy L Bilics 


Laura L. Bailey 


Adrianne K Billingham 


Christian J. Baird 


Cor Bilodeau 


Vandana Balachandar 


Jill Binkley 


Nicholar R. Balaji 


Brian N. Binkowski 


Gregory D. Ball 


Alsion M. Bich 


Joel Baptiste 


Sarah Birch 


Christine Barakat 


Shannon M. Bird 


Zeynak Barakat 


Scott Birmingham 


Gregory P. Barber Jr. 


Deidre Birnstiel 


Rafal Barczak 


William F. Bisceglia 


Brian Barker 


Joel B. Biswas 


Trey Barlow 


Ryan D. Bittman 


Tamika D. Barnes 


Brian Bittmann 


Christopher Barrett 


Sven Bjorkenstam 


Brian M. Barrio 


Jennifer J Blakeslee 


Kunta K. Barros 


School of Management 


Johanna Barry- 


Communications 


Shannon Barry 


Marketing 


Kelly Bardett 




Gregory D. Bartoli 


Frances Blanchette 


Manalie L. Baruah 


Karen H. Blanton 


Stephen Barwiskowski 


Stephanie A. Blazewicz 


School of Management 


Kefiryn Block 


MMM 


Christine F. Boctor 




Heather L. Bogan 


Paula L. Basco 


Charles Boguslaski 


Robert A. Bateman 


Michael Bohigian 


Laura Batenic 


Erin P. Boles 


Erik Bator 


Matthew D. Bonacci 


Brad Battaglia 


Mattew Bonavita 


Alison Beals 


Allison C. Booth 


Meredith M. Beaton 


Kibib 


Michael Beattie 


Borde-Nelson 


William J. Beauchesne 


Julie A. Boris 




Angela Borzon 


Sarah Becherer 


Caroline A. Bosworth 


Art and Sciences 


Lauren M Bosworth 


mmm 


Jeanine Bouche 




Jennifer Boutin 


Jennifer L. Becker 


Christopher P. Bowler 


Amy Beckman 


Noah S. Bowling 


Brian Belanich 


Laura Boyd 


Christina Belaval 


Jason Boyer 


Leah Belazarian 


Claire M Boyle 


David J. Belford 


Jennifer Boyle 


Janna 


Moira B. Boyle 



Tara M. Bradley 

Marcos Bragado-Meana 

Patrick J. Brennan 

John D Breslin Jr. 

Patrick T. Bresonis 

Elwyn Brewster 

Nicole Brewster 

Caroline A. Breyley 

Jeffrey A. Bridge 

JefiPmer K. Briggs 

Elizabeth H. Brogan 

Kevin T. Brophy 

Dawn A. Brown 

Eileen B. Brown Elena Brown 

Gena M. Brown 

Matthew B. Brown 

Megan Brown 
Timothy A. Brown 

Wade A. Brown 

Norman Brown IV 

Erica M. Browne 

Kelly Bruno 

Allison Bruns 

Jennifer N. Bucci 

Tammy Buchan 

Brendon B. Buckley 

Daniel J. Buckley 

7\nne Buckman 

Carol Buzik 

Christopher T. Bulens 

Michele Burderi 

Christopher J. Burke 

Daniel Burke 

William Q. Burke 

Jacqueline Burkhardt 

Matthew Burnell 

Megan Burns 

Bridget Burstein 

Steven W. Bussen 

Thomas Bustros 

Joseph Byer 

Patrick Byrne 

Sarah Byrnes 

CynthiaB. Cabral 

William J. Cadigan 

Alison Cahill 

Bridget Cahill 

George Cahill 

Richard Cahill 

Lee Calamis 

John J. Calcaterra 

Jennifer Callahan 

Sara Calncn 

Sar L. Camden 

Collette Cameron 

Aldred A. Caminos 

Hayley Cammeyer 



David Campbell 

Peter L. Campbell 

Sherice S. Campbell 

Lean Cannan 

Canh N. Cao 

Christopher M. Capozzi 

Michele A. Cardella 

John Cardillo 

Anothy Cardone 

Frederic P. Cardone 

Amy E. Carignan 

Robert M. Carley 

Matthew W. Carmell 

Collenn C. Carney 

Cathleen Carpenter 

Christopher Carr 

Mary K. Carr 

Sybil A. Carrade 

Yvonne Carrero 

Kerry A. Carroll 

Kevin Caruso 

Matt Casamassima 

Jaclyn Casey 

Sarah Casey 

David W. Cashman 

Patrick Cassidy 

Christina A. Cassis 

David Castagnetti 

Juliana Castelli 

Eric A. Cataldo 

Escel J. Catambay 

David Catrini 

Cherilyn D. Caufield 

Erin Caufield 

Mark- Anthony J. Cautela 

Joshua Cella 

Megan E. Cellitti 

Kate G. Cellucci 

Mettew Chabot 

Michelle L. Chadwick 

Veeken Chaglassian 

Glenn M. Chaleff 

Erin M Chalmers 

Stephen Chamerland 

Joy Chamers 

Mun Chan 

Terrence Chan 

Willy W. Chan 

Launen Chancier 

Michele D. Charbonnet 

Geraldine E. Charles 

Sean Chase 
Patrick J. Chatfield 

Jason Cheney 

Gwen M Cherfrne 

David Cherubin 

Molly Childs 

Geoff K. Chipman 

Seniors 495 




^y-^ 






■ --m^m 



»V l m "m 



^-.^ 



J 


1 



"1»#^;^^V^i# 



mM 






5^^*^" 



V^.-*^^ 









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ii*f^ Iftil^PP'w'''!'*' 



Ihr ''"• 



'TMiievety end ... 



Editor -Dani Flemmi 






hanks to the 
parents, family members, and 
friends who supported each us 
during our time at Boston 
College. Without your 
influence, we would not have 
become the individuals we are 
today. Graduation came so 
quickly and it is hard to believe 
our college years will soon be 
behind us. May the future bring 
us luck, love and happiness. 
Never forget the times we shared 
and the memories we made 
during our time on the Heights. 



Closing 



PiA tmjmBenefactors 



Mr. William J. Acker 

Thomas J. and Patricia S.Anathan 

Susan and Michael Argydan '7i,P'99;P'o3 

AmirN.Badaan 

Greg and Geraldine Barber 

JeffBarron 

Gita andjitendra K. Baruah 

Michael and Susan Blitzer 

The Bortolussi Family 

Dr. and Mrs. William L Bresonis 

David and Gail Brown and Family 

Mn and Mrs. Thomas A. Brown 

Anne and Pat Byrne 

Kristian M. Byrne 

Don and Nancy Campbell 

Mr and Mrs.Joseph Cardella 

Dr and Mrs. Vito Cardone 

William F. Connell 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Conners 



Gerry and Sue Cremins and Family 

Jefferson and Alison Crowther 

Toni and Brian Curry 

Maria and John Curtis 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth B. Cutler 

Mr and Mrs. Peter M. Dalton 

Dr and Mrs. James C. Day 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Del Priore 

Mr and Mrs. George J. Doehner 

Micaela and Frank English 

Mn and Mrs. E. F Fascett 

Mr and Mrs. K. Michael Forrest 

Dr andMrs.JohnJ. Fote 

Robert and Janet Gould 

Mr and Mrs. George Grigos 

Mr and Mrs. Vincent Grippo 

Dr and Mrs. Paul Harlow 

David and Lynda Hungerford and Family 

Mr and Mrs. Eric Jensen 



498 Platinum Benefactors 



Pla jtnlm Benefactors 



Mr. and Mrs. Vkken Karakashian 

Dn and Mrs. Mulazim H. Khan 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Kiely 

Achim and Pauline Knust 

Heinrich Lange 

Mr and Mrs. Joseph A.Larocque 

Dennis A. Lauria 

Mr and Mrs. James Ludwig 

James V.Malpeso,MD 

Mr and Mrs. Teddy Mang 

Gary and Sandra Matthews 

Dennis and Connie McGuinness 

Joe and Jill McKinstry Family 

William and Mary Mitchelson 

Mr and Mrs. Richard Morahito 

Mr and Mrs. Peter J. Morgan Jr 

Tom and Cheryl Murphy 

Mr and Mrs. Erich William Nehls 

Francesco D.Nesci 



Mr and Mrs. Robert T. O'Brien 
John and Kathleen Patten 

The Peschier Family 

James E. and Lois M. Pinkin 

Douglas G.Renz 

Dr. Jesus Rodriguez 

Mr and Mrs. Ernesto V.Rodulfo 

John W Schubert 

Dr and Mrs. G. Ph Hip Scott 

Linda Steel 

DrandMrs.John G.Sullivan 

Dr and Mrs. Michael K. Sutley 

Martin and Elizabeth Teevan and Family 

Karl and Pat Walczak 

Frank E. Webers 

Michael and Christine Whelan 

Lew and Toby Adams Whitney 

Mr andMrs.John H. Woods 

Kenneth and Donna Yarmosh 



Platinum Benefactors 499 



Qd^D (BE^!FJ^lC10!}iS 



Marl<i9. andVakrieJ.Andreotta 

Tfr. and Mrs. Joseph 'Bacotti 

Michaef and ^atfiken 'Ba/q^r 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bartoti 

Marino 'Basetice MT) 

Hedij Ian Beiden 

'RgSert C. Bogusfaslq 

James C. Boiand 

TeterM. Boosaiis 

Mr. and Mrs. 'Fatricf^'Brennan 

John J. Bresiin 

'Dr. and Mrs. Wiffiam Brozvn 

9(ancij and Jim Buc/qnan 

Mr. and Mrs. 9\(at Caruso 

Mr and Mrs. James Chatfieid 

Dougtas and 'Kathleen Chitds 

Michaet and Artery Cojohn 

Judy and Hilt CotBert 

The Coof^ 'Jamity 

'Donafd and Louise Costetb 

Michae[and%athy Costeffo 

'Dave and Barbara Costigan 

Dr andMrs. 'William Q. Crawford 

Antonio A. Cruz 

Mrs. Michael'}. Curran 

Mr. andMrs. Douglas J. Danzig 

Mr. andMrs. Thomas A. Dean 

Michael and Barbara Demeter 

Lauren M. Deshamais 

Mr. andMrs. John De^se 

Dr. Santo and Debbie Dijino 

Carol and Daniel Donovan 

Dr. andMrs. Qary 'K Dubin 



Dr. andMrs. H^obertA. Durbin 

Mr. andMrs. Joseph % 'Ettore 

Terrence and Barbara Tinegan 

Celeste Tinison 

Dr. andMrs. John J. Tinn 

Mr. andMrs. Ifrederic Q. friedman 

Feter and 'Elizabeth garrison 

Qeorge and'Viclq Qaudette 

David and Tatricia Qaulin 

CarlT- Qerster 

Mr. andMrs. Taul Qilleberto 

Mr. andMrs. Martin % Qilmartin 

Murray andlQiren Qlazer 

David and Angela Qrande 

Mr andMrs. Thomas D. Qranger 

Mr. andMrs. Qeorge 1{, Qray 

Janet and David Qrijfith 

Mr andMrs. 'Vincent Qrubb 

Mr andMrs. David'W. Qwatkjn 

Dr andMrs. Qeorge 'W. Oiager III 

Zoya iHajianpour 

Daniel A. and Judith % Oiersh 

Jane and Dan Hicl^y and family 

Bill and Harriet Hilfinger 

John % Oiozuells 

Mr andMrs. James H. Oiyland 

Stan and Judy Jirout 
Dr andMrs. Jredericli^A. 'Kayal 

'Patricia 1(elly-Stiles 

Todd and Donrw. 1(iseau-0rvald 

Mr andMrs. l^chardT Xlein, Jr 

Dennis and Tatricia 1(rissil<i 

'Pam and Marc Landry 



500 Gold BencCactor 



Qdw 




!A.ntfwmj and Lynn Latona 

CD avid % Lovejoy 

Mr. and Mrs. MidhaeiT). MadDonatd 

'Dr. and Mrs. Wiffiam Macey 

Mr. and Mrs. Alberts. Maimtii 

Joseph and Mary-Jo Maisto 

Mr and Mrs. 'Kgger MaOwtra 

Mr and Mrs. Tat Marantette 

Tauta Suitivan Massoni 

Susan and John McCann 

'Thomas and Helen MdDermott 

'Edward and %athken MdHugh 

'Peter and Marion McLaughlin 

June 'V. McLean 

Jim and 'Kelly McShane 

Mr and Mrs. H^oger Melichar 

'Drs. Angel and Anita Millora 

Mr and Mrs. 'Dominicl<iMormile 

Mr and Mrs. 'E. James Mulcahy, Jr 

'Dr and Mrs. Alan (B. Munro 

Sudhir 9{air 

'Dr and Mrs. John 9\[iziol 

Mr. and Mrs. 'William Q. 9{prton 

Eugene andjuanita 9\(pstrame 

'Bryan J. 9{gwlin 

'Paul and Marie 0"Brien 

Mr and Mrs. Dennis J. O'Leary 

'BrianE.0%eilly'99 

Christian 'Paletta and 'Blair 'Jorlaiu 

'Paul and 'Esther 'Pampas 

Mr. and Mrs. 'Kgbert 'Pereless 

Mr and Mrs. Qeorge 'Pignataro 

Mr and Mrs. Herbert 'Porter, Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. James % 'Plotner 



Mr and Mrs. David J. Tosel<i 

John andArline 'Puccio 

'Kerry % lieynells 

Joe and Qinny H^ipp 

Luis and!^sita 'Rgdriguez 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 'J. 'B^Haue.r 

'V. Timothy and Mary Ann 'Kgoney 

Joseph and'Randi Sacl^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Eduardo Sardina 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Scatuorchio 

Mr. and Mrs. John Schimpf 

'Pat and Marty Schuler 

Mr and Mrs. L. Scotto 

Mr and Mrs. John L. Segreti 

John and Janice Sheehan 

Hap and Donna Shepherd 

Mr and Mrs. 'William A. Siegel 

Mr and Mrs. James 'W. Sil^prslq. 

^bert and 'Patricia Smith 

Mr Jran/<iSousa andDr Irene Sousa 

Eileen T. and Stephen J. Tuc/(er 

'Professor David Ttvomey 

Janet andTerrence llllrich 

Mr and Mrs. 'Vincents. 'Walkgwiak^ 

'Kgger and Cindy 'Warrender 

Dr. and Mrs. John 'Weisenberger 

Tlorie, Laura, and Ian 'Welch 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 'Whitbread 

Scott and Susan 'Wilfong 

Jessica 'Wiltz 

Dr and Mrs. 'Kenneth A. 'Wynes/q 

Mr and Mrs. H^aymond 'Wysoclq 

Hubert L. and'Bemadette 'Joung 

Jay and Dee 'Jbst 



Gold Benefactors 501 



Silver BmEFACiORS 



Judy and Chip Attwood 

David and Mary Babin 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester R. Babst 

Jim Lowe and Susan Bannon 

Bill and Jeanne Barulich 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Beattie 

Philip and Melanie Becker 

William P. Benedict 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Blazewicz, Jr. 

James and Mary Jane Boris 

Bill and Gloria Boyd 

Jane and John Boyle 

John Donovan Breslin, Jr. 

Charles and Renee Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Cambron 

Helen Campana 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Capozzi 

Mr. and Mrs. William Carmell 

Charles and Eleanor Carr 

Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Cassamassima 

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick J. Cassidy 

Vito and Maureen Catanese 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Nick Catrini 

Eva and Bill Chalejf 

Katherine K. Chamberland 

Dr. and Mrs. C S. Chan 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell E. Cicero 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward T. Conlon 

Pat Cowan and Steve Miller 

Mary, Don, and Kevin Coyle 

Jose and Orpha Crespo 

Mr. and Mrs. John Curelli 

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Curan 

Tom and Sally Curtin 

Mary and Bill Darkoch 

Dr. and Mrs. Jagannath Das 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert DeSena 

Paulette and Thomas Deely 

Thomas G. Delia Penna '63 

Tara Ann Del Savio 
Kerrie and Frank DeLuca 
Bob and Emily DeSantis 
Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Devine 
Terry and Chrissy DeVoto 
John and Kathy Dickman 
Mr. and Mrs. Larry DiGregorio 



Mr. and Mrs. Michael Dooling 
Mr. and Mrs. D. J. Drage 

Pete and Katie Driscoll 

Mr. and Mrs. David Driver 

Mr. and Mrs. John Durante 

Barbara Piemonte Eisenzopf 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Estock 

Alain J. Falkenburger 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank A. Fortuna II 

Mary A. Franklin 

Bill and Roberta Frey 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Gilson 

Michael and Barbara Green 

Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Grenon 

Frank J. Grueter LIL 

Mr. and Mrs. Greogry S. Guido 

Mr. and Mrs. George G. Guimaraes 

Herbert H. Hagermoser, MD 

John and Terry Hall 

David and Maureen Harris 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Harvey 

Guy and Gail Heald 

Gr etch en and Jim Henry 

Mary Howard Holberton 

Alex and Sheila Humen 

Ewa and Albert Jacunski 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Jannace 

Jerry and Janice Johnston 

Stephanie C Johnston 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Kandel 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Karosen 

Tara Jane Kitley 

Steve and Aggie Koutroupas, Dean, Vanessa, Karl 

Don and Susan Lamers 

Bob and Catherine Leuchs 

The Liggetts 

Jong and Mimi Lim 

Sophie and Alex Kwok Min Lim 

Jerry and Marueen Linehan 

Thomas and Sarah MacMahon 

Leo and Marie Majeski 

William and Marie Maloney 

Mr. and Mrs. Goerge Maniatis 

Ms. Lani L. Masso 

Brian and Gail McCabe 

Jerry and Chris McCarty 



502 Silver BeuiJy.ctors 



Silver Benefacidm 



George and Natalie McCeney 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. McClean, Jr. 

Maria McCullough 

Karen and Bob McDonald 

William and Rose Ann McDonald 

Constance and John McPheeters 

John and Kathy McSweeney 

Alberto and Ruth Mena 

John and Shirely Mercieri 

Vasilios and Victoria Migdalis 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Miklus 

Alan Medville and Roberta Miller 

Louise and Bill Miller 

Tom and Janice Milone 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Mirabella 

Lucille and Frank Miscioscia 

Rob and Ginny Moe 
Mr. and Mrs. William Moon 

Lynn and Dick Moran 

Martha and Nicholas Morin 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Muenzen 

Deborah A. Mullen 

Joyce Murphy 

Jim and Roselle Neely 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Newell 

G. William Newton 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard O 'Conell 

Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence R. O'Connor 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel O'Rourke 

Mr. and Mrs. Bandele Emilola Oguntolu 

Judd and Helen Ostrom 

Dr. and Mrs. Roger Patnode 

Ray and Betty Paulhus 

John and Kate Reiser and Family 

Michael and Donna Penna 

Paul "Pete " and Joan Peterik 

Dr. and Mrs. Gregory F. Pfister 

Don and Moneth Piper 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Pohlad 

Jim and Donna Polechronis 

Barbara and Alan Quebec 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Rail 

Kathleen and James Ramich 

Dr. and Mrs. M. Joseph Ramirez 

Mr. and Mrs. K Michael Randall 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy D. Reed 



Pat and Phil Riley 

Judith Rogan 

Ray and Merrie Romano 

Dr. Mark and Renee Romanowsky 

Rosbeck Family 

Mr. and Mrs. John Rossi 

William and Janice Sage 

Judith L. Sbrogna 

Michael and Patricia Scarola 

Michael and Judy Scavotto 

Steve and Kate Schoenhaus 

S. Sengamalay 

Michael Damian Sheehan 

Jane Shore-Gripp 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Siciliano 

Diane C. Sieminski 

Albert and Dorothy Skirius 

Dianne Slater 

Chris, Mike, and Laura Spates 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo J. Spirito 

Paul A. and Jeanne M. Steele 

Susan and William Steele 

Gayle and Stella Stone 

Carole F. Swanstrom 

Michael and Diane Sweeney 

Mr. Sharad and Mrs. Mahinder Tak 

Mr. and Mrs. Jagdish C. Thakral 

Claude Thau 

Wade and Priscilla Thomas 

Mary Jane and Robert Tinari 

Adriana Pilar Torres 

Dr. and Mrs. Shafic Twal 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Veneziano 

Maria and Robert Viscardi 

The Vollono Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Weigman 

James and Dolores White 

William and Mary Ann Wiegand 

Mr. and Mrs. John Williams 

Peter and Glenda Wilson 
Bridget and Dennis Withers 

Lyle and Susan Wong 
Roger and Mary Lee Worboys 

Yetman Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Sanford Zinman 

Cathy and Tom Zurla 



Silver Benefactors 503 



Patron Benefactors 



Joanne and Ross Alan 
Linda and Jerry Alemian 

The Amore Family 

Al and Diane Anderson 

Anonymous 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Archabal 

Mr. and Mrs. Marco Arquilla 

Robert and Blanche Aucoin 

Mr. and Mrs. Joaquin Avino 

Dr. and Mrs. M. R. Balaji 

Dr. and Mrs. Maurice Barakat 

Patricia and Richard Baran 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Barlow II 

Mark and Kathy Batenic 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Batde, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Beauchesne 

Dr. Jeff and Dr. Susan Becherer 

Jim and Lynne Belazarian 

Robert and Kathleen BeUino 

Joanna M. Belmonte 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Berthiaume 

Daphne and John Bertrand 

Mr. and Mrs. James G. Binkley 

Steve and Diane Birkeland 

Bissett Family 

William and Lisa Blackmer 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo Bohigian 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Boland 

Mr. and Mrs. C. David Bonacci 

Moira Bridget Boyle 

The Brady Family 

The Brie Family 

Larry and Betsy Bridge 

Dennis and JoAnn Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Bucci 

John and Ann Marie Buckley 

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick J. Burns, Sr. 

Burnstein Family 

Manuel and Loretta Campo 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph R. Caravano 

Pat Carignan 

Frank and Susan Carrazza 

Mr. and Mrs. Enrique Carrero 



Cara and Lee Cashman 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Paul Cataldo II 

Jack and Colleen Caulfield 

Thomas and Nancy Chancier 

Gary and Eileen Chase 

Kathi L. Chipman 

Marie and Ray Christie 

Michael and Ann Cibulka 

Carl and Jane Cirillo 

Catherine Clark 

Jeffrey and Orquidea Coats 

Maria and Joe Coccaro 

Margaret and Brady Cole 

Wini and John Colleran 

Marian and Anthony Comprelli and Family 

Maggie and Bob Conger 

Dr. Daniel and Robin McGinnity Connelly 

Gail M. Conroy 

Roger and Loretta Consolla 

John F. Cooney, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Cooney 

Dorothy Cooper 

Thomas J. Cormican 

Tony and Mary Costagliola 

Cotroneo Family 

Joan and Ralph Cozza 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Cronin 

In Memory of Donald E. Cronin 

Martha M. Cronin 

Lynda and Tom Crowley 

Patricia Cwiklinski 

Kathleen M. and John Dabagian 

Thomas J. Dammrich 

Dolores and Joseph Dauenhauer 

Dick and Millie Delaney 

Paul and Denise Delaney 

Steve and Mary K. Dennison 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth DeRosa 

Charles and Lynn Devine and Family 

Timothy and MaryEllen Devine 

Walter and Veronica DeWind 

Gail A. Dillon 



504 Patroii Benefactors 



Patron Benefactors 



Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. DiMartino 

G. Curtis Dippold 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward G. Dombrowski 

Gingi and Barry Donohue 

Paul and Rita Downey 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Duddy 

Very Rev. and Mrs. James S. Dutko 

Joanne and Daniel Dwyer 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen L. Dwyer 

Mr. and Mrs. James B. Elliott 

Rosanne and Bill Everett 

Robert and MaryLu Fallon 

John R. Feore, Jr. 

Richard and Christine Ferrarone 

Dr. and Mrs. David S. Field 

Nancy and John Finnegan 

Cindi and Tim Finnigan 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Foody 

Michael N. Ford 'dl 

Mr. and Mrs. John Fox 

Terri Freda 

The William H. Frieswyk Family 

Angelo and Joanne Frischetti 

Dr. and Mrs. Gerardo A. Gamez, MD 

Paul and Cathie Gatto 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Gerlt 

Allen and Susan Gilbert 

John and Kathleen Gillespie 

Thomas and Eileen Gilmore 

Dr. and Mrs. Michael J. Gleason 

Dr. Mel Glenn and Judith Ashway 

Lauren Godden 

Mr. and Mrs. Joel Goldblatt 

Barbara Golden, MD 

Robert and Paula Goodman 

Andrew and Diane Gori 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Gorman 

John P. Grattan 

Peter and Diane Guay 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald J. Fiaak 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Haggerty 

Richard and Lucille Halgin 



Mr. and Mrs. William K. Hamilton 

John and Janet Fiandwerk 

Bill and Janet Fiannon 

John Fiansell 

Janice M. Fiarrison 

Mr. and Mrs. P. Joseph Fiart 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Fiaug 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard K. Hayden 

Attorney and Mrs. Richard D. Fiayes 

Barbara and Mark Fielms 

Joseph Hermenegildo 

The Fieusner Family 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Flill 

Stephen and Barbara Fiischier 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hodge, Sr. 

Charles and Judith Hofifhine 

Ellen S. Holmes 

Gary and Janet lUingworth 

Jo-Ann Dias-Isaac 

Thomas and Theodora Jackson 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert James 

Marty and Neal Jansen 

Robert and Gay Johnson 

Tom and Chris Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. G. K. Joshi 

Jack and Laurin Keddy 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Kelleher 

Paul and Mary Jo Kelleher 

Peggy and Joe Kelleher 

John P. Kelly, DMD, MD, '64 

Judy and Larry Kennedy 

Chris Keswani-Patron 

Margaret Postlewaite and Gerard Kiernan 

Erina Kim 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Klingler 

Dr. and Mrs. John Knasas 

Dennis and Linda Kneib 

Monk and Betsy Koch 

Mary A. Koss 

Mr. and Mrs. George J. Koufos 

Kathleen Kurtz 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Lacz, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. LaFalce 



Patron Benefactors 505 



Patron Benefactors 



Tom and Maureen Lambrix 

Cheryl and Jerry Lebo 

Boo Young and Seung Ji Lee 

Mr. and Mrs. Joesph V. Leone 

Gordon and Susan Lipscy 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony J. Lombardo 

Fred and Cynthia Lorman 

Paul and Kathy Lotzer 

E. Noel Luddy II 

Janice and George Lyons 

Andrew and Eileen MacAvoy 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Smoot 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard J. Magee 

Mr. and Mrs. Steve J. Mahoney 

Rich and Donna Maley 

Jeffrey and Karen Malnick 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles-Henri Mangin 

Richard and Tracy Marisa 

Gene and Kathy Martell 

Mr. and Mrs. Jino Masone 

Daniel and Marilyn Massey 

Steven and Charlene Mastronardi 

Charles and Patricia Maurer, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael McCafferty 

Charlene and Don McClure 

Tom and Part McCormick 

Ginger and Richard McCourt 

Don and Gerry McGowan 

George and Eileen McGregor 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph McHale 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. McKinney 

Rick and Colleen McLaughlin 

Suzanne S. McLaughlin 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas G. McPeek 

Joe and Peg Medved 

Lee and Linda Meier 

Mr. and Mrs. Almir Menezes 

Vivian and Frank Meringolo 

Dr. and Mrs. John Messitt 

Richard R. Metz, Sr. 

Tom and Beth Mewhinney 

Maureen and Alan Mikucki 

Eduardo and Maria Mila-Prats 

Eileen and Doug Miller 



Dr. and Mrs. Russell Wm. Miller 

Laurie and John Minger 

Harry and Jean Missirlian 

Mr. and Mrs. Eli Mistovich and Family 

Patricia and Richard Montague 

Mr. and Mrs. Doug Montgomery 

Bernard and Susan Moule 

Peter W. and Mary Ann C. Moxon 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Muldoon 

Joseph B. Mullek 

Mr. and Mrs. Al Mulvey 

Stephen and Kathleen Murray 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Myles 

Joe and Maria Navin 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Newman 

Richard and Maureen Nichols 

Jean and Richard Nold 

Bill and Jacque O'Brien 

Colleen and Pat O'Brien 

Mr. and Mrs. Gary J. O'Brien 

Mr. and Mrs. George A O'Brien 

Linda McCarthy O'Brien 

Mrs. R. Michael O'Brien, Jr. 

Tom and Marge O'Brien 

Greg and Carole O'Connell 

The O'Donnell Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. O'Donnell 

Michael and Jane O'Farrell 

Joseph and Carolyn O'Leary 

Sally O'Leary 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. O'Neill 

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick J. O'Sullivan, Sr. 

Charles and Gilda Omage 

Mr. and Mrs. Em Orosz 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Owens 

David and Ann Padlick 

Christine Palmer 

George J. Palmer 

Chian-ping Ye and Dajun Pang 

Mr. and Mrs. Konstantinos Papdopoulos 

Dhan and Kashimira Parekh 

Mahendra Patel 
Stanley and Rosemary Patten 



506 Patron Benefactors 



Patron Benefactors 



Mr. and Mrs. William Paul 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Pearson 

Marjorie Perron 

Marie and Tony Petitti 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent D. Phillips, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond M. Piacentini 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald R. Pierce 

Ann and Lorey Pollack and Family 

Gwendolyn J. Poteat 

Christine Powers 

Gail and Jerry Prassas 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Quinn 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul R. Ramirez 

Mr. and Mrs. Eliseo T. Rana 

Robert and Mary Reeder 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Regan 

Karen Thomas Reinecke 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Rigo 

Colonel Thomas J. Rini 

John and Joanne Rogan 

James and Janice Ross 

Bill and Sandra Rueb 

James and Debra Ruel 

Martin and Maria Rystrom 

Joseph L. Sabatino 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul W. Sandman 

Rocky and Rose Sansevero 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Schnieders 

Karen P. Schrader 

Domenica Schulz-ScarpuUa 

Patrick E. Scura 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Serafino 

Joseph and Eileen Shea 

Brenda Sherwin 

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Shuler 

Gerald Simard 

Mr. and Mrs. George S. Simmons III 

Catherine A. Singagliese 

Ernest and Claire Smith 

George and Mary Ellen Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Smoot 

Dave and Jo Soroka 

Mr. and Mrs. George Spencer, Sr. 



Jack and Diane Stauffer 

The Stautberg Family 

Don and Lynn Stead 

Gordon and Barbara Sulcer 

Mr. and Mrs. David R. Sullivan 

Timothy M. and Susan M. Sullivan 

Robert and Ellen Svenning 

Dr. and Mrs. Donald B. Symanowicz 

Robert and Noriko Tanigawa 

Gary and Kathy Thompson 

Ron and Kathy Thompson 

Rich and Patty Tilghman 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Tlucek 

Charlie and Sandy Toczylowski 

Tomaslewski Family 
Dr. and Mrs. Richard Tonzola 
Norman and Alexandra Tsacalis 

The Tomas J. Turick Family 

Stephen and Marianne Underbill 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas P. Vaglio 

Lois and Bert Van Fleet 

Vassallo Family 

Bob and Mary Carol Venanzi 

The Viafore Family 

Ralph Vizzari 

Charleen and George Volk 

Eileen Wade 

Bill and Sue Wales 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond E. Walker 

Karen and Ray Warco 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Warshaw 

Drs. Carol and Michael Weingarten 

Susan and Alan Weiss 

Fred and Jane Wiecher 

Mr. and Mrs. Randy Willetts 

James X. and Janice Wilson 

Jennifer Wilson 

Mrs. Noreen M. Winstanley 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Wise 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Wojie 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Xeller 

Nhan Tu Yen 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Young 

Diane and Bill Ziobro 



Patron Benefactors 507 



y^dvettlsements 



This section has traditionally been reserved for advertisements from businesses in the 
Boston College area. As the staff at Sub Turri has tried to make this year's book a 
reflection of the Boston College community, I decided to change this section from 
focusing on businesses in the area to focusing on our students—specifically seniors. 
Parents answered enthusiastically to my call for pictures and words of wisdom for their 
seniors, and thus the Parent Ad section was born. I must thank all the parents for 
contributing photos of their children and offering words of love and advice for their 
graduating seniors. 

^ Dani Flemming^ 




508 Parent Ads 



DeanKojjto^ 

Stay Greek 




You're a special son and brother who cares, is 

centered in his values, and loves his family 

and God. Happiness always. Agape. 

Dad, Mom, Vanessa, and Karl 



Ryan A. Vogt-Lowell 

Congratulations! - 




God blessed you with many talents; you chose 

to use them. We're thankful for that and for 

letting us be an important part of your life! 

Love, Mom, Dad, Rene, Jen, Nicole, Mima and Pipo 



Son, 

Just a few words -- Dedication, 
Determination, Motivation, 
Inspiration, Compassion, Excellence. 
It's as though you have lived your 
whole life by the definition of these 
very words. The love you give and 
your love of life radiates from you and 
affects all of those that you have 
known or touched. You have cer- 
tainly made us so very proud. Thank 
you for being a model son. 
Congratulations. 

We love you so much. 
Mom and Dad 




Michael Ryan MacMillan 



Parent Ads 509 




"Oh, the Places You'll Go! 
You're ofFto Great Places! 
Today is your Day! 
Your mountain is waiting. 
So. . .get on your way!" 

With love and joy in who 
you are, 

Mom, Dad & David 

Cara McCafferty 



JEN, 

These last four years went 

by so quickly! We are so 

proud of you! We love you 

and know you will SHINE 

wherever you go! Success is 

yours! Keep smiling that 

beautiful smile— Reach for 

trie sts^rs 

Love you always, MOM, DAD, and KATES 

Jennifer Cibulka 




WITH ALL OUR LOVE 




What lies 

behind us, 
and what Ues 

before us 
are tiny matters 

compared to 
what Ues 

within us. 

You've always worked hard to achieve your goals. 
Your accomplishments have made us all so proud of 
you. We know you will continue to succeed in 
whatever you choose. 

May the future hold the happiness and love you 
deserve. 

Always, 

Mom, Grandma, Tamara, 

Brian, Michelle, 

Sondra & Alaina 

Heather Murp. 





Colleen—Congratulations on your graduation 
from Boston College. Continue to live your 
dreams. We love you and are proud of you. 
Love, Mom, Dad, Dan 

Colleen Dono 



510 Parent Ads 



ii- 



Jill Catherine Randall 






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.iB 


M 1^ 


^^^ft 


""^ i^H 


^Hi 


_«^^^H 



You've grown into a lovely 
young woman who is kind, 
thoughtful, and generous. 
Along with your deep 
compassion for others, you 
will truly make a difference.... 
We are proud and love you 
very much. 

Mom, Dad, Beth, 
Adam, and Mark 




Parent Ads 511 




SUuBumoamo'ii..'^ ■■■-.' I'^nimmmAmmm&m 



512 Parent Ads 



You have grown into an exceptional and 

beautiful young woman. You set your goal? 

and accomplished them through hard work 

Don't ever forget that we love you and thai 

we will always be there for you. We are sure 

that success and happiness will be a part oi 

your life. You are and have always been c| 

source of joy and happiness for us. 

All our love, 

Mom, Dad and Anthony 

Grandma 

Aunt Carmel and Uncle John 



/' 



JAMES i). KINSEY 

We are very proud of you. May 
your future be filled with 
wonderful adventures. Use your 
talents and gifts wisely. We are sure 
that you will make the most 
of whatever comes your way. 
Much love, Mom, DadandMarisa 



Nicole Woods 

Life's a dance, you learn as you go. 
Sometimes you lead, sometimes you follow. 

Congratulations to our wonderful daughter 

Our cup runneth over 



Love, 



Dad, Mom, and Peff 



Keep reaching for your dreams 




As you graduate trom college, we couidnt be more 
proud of you or love you more. Our wish for you is a 
life full of love and happiness. Congratulations! 
Love, 

Michelle Leigh Chadwick 



Rm^,Set,Golll 

Congratulations to Claire, 
ourfavoritc daughter 
andhest' ever sister. 



with much love and pride, 
Mom, Dad, Michael, and David 



Claire Raniich 




Parent Ads 513 



Semper Fi 



Joseph 

Wayne 

Finnigan 




v 






— ir^-^Jl 



^-- -' ^ 




We are proud of you! 

We love you. 

Mom, Dad, Ellen & Tom 



May the road rise to meet you, 

May the wind be always 

at your back... 

May God hold you 

in the palm of His hand. 




You are the joy, love and peace in our lives! 

We could not be prouder of you and your 

accomplishments 




Enjoy life, be happy and always remember we 

are there for you. 

Love, Grandma, Mom, Dad, Jeff, 

Chris and Tamara /,,,„,/, 5 j^^^^^ 



Now you're really ready to handle 
the world. Good luck in the 
future. We're very proud of you. 

Love, Mom, Dad and Rod 

Terrance Ian t 



514 Parent Ads 



". . . If in your thought, you must measure time into seasons, 
let each season encircle all the other seasons. 

And let today embrace the past with 
remembrance and the future with longing. " 



Kahlil Gibran 




Wade E. Saadi, Jr. 



Parent Ads 515 



4P^^ 



W^w»*- 



GO PEEKEE! 

St. Theresa, O'Dowd, B.C., 
Wall Street or Cordon Bleu 

We're with you! 

Love, 

The Good Egg Club 

Courtney Hischier 




SANDI, 

The pigtails may be 
gone, but you're still 
our little girl. Love, 
MOM & DAD 

Good work "little" 
sister. Love, DAN 

We're proud of you. 
Love, GRAMMY & 

ED MESS 

Sandi Nagy 



Co9ig^'mLmio9^ ^^K^ifMjpo^i 




Jour zest for fife and Learning has helped you achieve a ' 
significant mikstom in your fife. So ivitfi pride for alt 
you've been, zvithjoyfor aCCyou are, ivitfi hope for ait 
you' it be, andtoith love ativays, xve uHshyou all the 
happiness and success that you deserve. 
Love, 

Mom, T)ad, Tnc, Adam and Cody Brandon Warn 



Anne Buckman 



WITH LOVE 

Graduation can't really be here for you! We are very 
proud of you and your wonderful accomplishments. 
We love you and know you will be successful in all 
your endeavors. 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Elizabeth, and Julia 





5 1 6 Parent Ads 



I 



Kerin Sikorski 

A dream is a wish your heart makes. . . 

Follow those dreams wherever 
they may lead, and that dream 
that you wish will come true! 
We are very proud of you. 
Congratulations. 

Love, Mom, Dad, 

and Kristin 



KAREN SYMANOWICZ 

YOU ARE OUR SUNSHINE! 






CONGRATULATIONS 



LOVE, MOM AND DAD 



Karen Symanowicz 



A Ray of Sunshine 



Watching you grow into a 
wonderful young lady has 
made our lives such a re- 
warding experience. We are 
so proud of you and we love 
you so very much. God bless 
you. 

Dad, Mom, and Michele 

Daniele Berqeron 




Dear Vikas, 

Congratulations! We celebrate 
your accomplishments and 
applaud your achievements. 

Love, 
John & Judy 

Vikas Madan 



Parent Ads 517 



Robert James Morgan 

Congratulations ! 




1 


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r 


w-ajjgH 


fev^ 


limig^H 




Roses are red, violets are blue, 
your flat, funny hat. . . 
looks awesome on you! 

You have given us a lifetime of 
happiness and we've never been 
more proud of you and your 
many accomplishments. Your 
future is bright—reach for the 
stars! 

All our love. 
Mom and Dad 



Laura h 



518 Parent Ads 




With much love, 

You did it! We can't believe 
this time is here. We always 
told you to follow your dreams 
and you did. We are all so 
proud of you. We know you 
will succeed in whatever you 
do! 
We Love You 

Dad, Mom, and Jon 

Allyson Shuler 



Kristin Stead 

Oh, the places you'll go! 

-It's your world, I'm just a squirrel 

try in' to get a nut! 

We are very proud of you. 
All our love. 

Dad, Mom, and Nick 



SARAH AISLINN STONE 

I am very proud of you. 





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Love, Mommy 




Always be one with yourself; 
Always strive to give of yourself; 
Always walk to your goals 
firmly and with bold steps. 

Love, 
Mom, Dad, Joe, and Mike 





i 


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Stephen Raid 



Parent Ads 519 



Corin Murphy 

With all our love & kisses! 
If your future successes equal 
the love and pride we have for 
you and the countless joys you 
have provided, then 

the sky's the hmit! 

Love, Mom, Dad, Craig 
Bailey & Clover 




yjttgjii/fm^^^A 



J\evin, 

Congratulations!! We are so proud of you! You 
have always brought joy and happiness into our 
lives. Continue to maintain your strong values, your 
spirited smile, and "always do the right thing." 
Follow your heart, and your dreams will come true. 
God Bless you always. 



Love, 
Dad, Mom, and David 



Kevin Trimble 




Andrew CuRRAN 

Congratulations 

We are very proud of you. 

We love you! 

Mom, JoHannah and Mary Helen 



Danielle Dineen 

CONGRATULATIONS! 




Love, Mom and Dad 



520 Parent Ads 




The World Is Your Stage 

Conor, 

All the world is your stage 
now. Continue to play your 
part with passion, integrity, and 
a willingness to help others. 
We love you and we're proud of 
you today and always. 

Love, 
Mom, Dad, Brock and Ashley 



Conor Dubi, 




From Ashton to BC GRAD, 

what an accomplishment for 

our precious Sarah Lynn, . . 

Love, Mom, Dad, and Hannah 

Sarah Lynn Matthews 



JAMES POLECHRONIS 
WE LOVE YOU!!!! 

There's so much we'd like to 
promise you in life. To give you 
wisdom, that only passing years 
bring. Promise you success, that 
you alone will find. Promise you 
happiness, but the path that leads 
you there, only you can discover, 
but our love has always been there 
fi-om the start and will be something 
you can always count on. 
WE PROMISE YOU THAT! 
Love, Dad, Mom, and Chris 





JANIS CORNWELL 

May you always 

walk in sunshine. 
We are so very 
proud of you. 
Love you, baby! 
Mom and Dad 



Parent Ads 521 



^ou have ativaxfS been out ''stax\ (Son^tatuiatLons, and may you 
have happiness, Love and success ait ifour U-^e. YOe ate and atwaifS wilt be 
ptoud o-^ x^ou. 

yAtt out tvve, 

/Hommif, ^en, /lestie and ^ames 




522 Parent Ads 



Mark Mullek 
Congratulations 




We are very proud of all your hard work and look 

forward to your return to the Gulf Coast. 

Best wishes for a great future. 

Mom, Dad, Tim, Vicki, 

Michael, Roberta and Anna 



Joe Martell 

You've always been sensitive to the subtle quali- 
ties of life and bring out the best of all who know 
you... especially us! So proud of you... and love 
you lots! 

Mom, Dad, Dan, Matt and Cassie! 





^Iz, /Koon and Karen ^sacatis 



Jessica, 

You have accomplished so much and we are very proud of 
you. With the help of God and your family you will continue 
to achieve your dreams andyour life goals. May God 
continue to hless you forever 




Love always, 
Mom, Dad and Vanessa 



Jessica Crespo 



"3 count mifsei-^ in nothing else so kappif 
■/\s in a soul lemembetin^ mxf ^ood -^liends." 

XOe're so tuckif, and so ptoud. 

TVitk Cove -^lom xjoui ^ast (Z-oast and 
YOest (Zoast jjamiUcs 



Parent Ads 523 



Frederic Cardone 

We are very proud of you! 






What an accomplishment! 

You are now at the point where a new life is opening in front of 
you. Take the best of it and enjoy. 
We love you and will always be there for you! 
Mom, Dad, Vanessa and Laetitia 



524 Parent Ads 



Lisa M. Hagermoser 
Last, but definitely not least! 




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You've come a long way, baby! ! You have the 
ability and the drive to accomplish what you 
wish. Your mother would be very proud! 
Love, 

Dad and Family 



Parent Ads 525 




JENN- Life's a Dance... 
Rock on! 

The longer I live, the more I 
believe You do have to give if 
you wanna receive. There's a 
time to listen and a time to 
talk. And you might have to 
crawl even after you walk. 
I've had sure things blow up 
in my face. Seen the long shot 
win the race. Been knocked 
down by the slammin ' door. 
Picked myself up and came back for more. 

Life's a dance, you learn as you go. Sometimes you lead, 
sometimes you follow. Don 't worry 'bout what you don 't 
know. Life's a dance, you learn as you go. 

We love you so much, honey. You go, girl! 
Love: Mom & Joe 

Bill/Jeamiine/Grandma/Aunt Diane & Barry/ 
Aunt Dorreen 
Cousins Brian, Andrea & Derek , ,. „„. 

Jennifer tllis 



Congratulations Jennifer 

With Love From 
Dad, Mom, and Prisciiia 



Jennifer Kuge 




Eric Antl^on^ Cataibo 

As an eagfe tabfis fligjrt; omvarb anS 
mwarb aver vi&ias of o/^jrortJinitj? 
U)at (ie tejjoHc)/ Ui^e streMfjt^ m "igowt 
parents' wriDe \n '^ow ac^iei/ements 
anh coMifort \n oar [oi;e anb supjjort 
to 0Mi9e 2J0H ^ougl; 'v. ^ 

oMt ^om life, 1^ .^^ 



O^ou made it! 



Congratidations, 

Mom & DoD 



W 




526 Parent Ads 



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Dear Margaret, 

Congratulations! There are no words that can ever tell you how proud we are of you or how very much 
we love you. Our trust and confidence in you have never wavered and you have never disappointed us. 
What a privilege it has been to watch you grow into the bveautiflil, funny, intelligent woman you are 
today. 

We wish you achievement (the knowledge that you have studied and worked hard and done the best 
that is in you) and success (the praise of others), the wisdom to know the difference, joy, love and under- 
standing and peace of mind. 

We know how bright your future is and can only hope that you realize that you hold the world in the 
palm of your hand. As you soar skyward we will watch with joy and pride. May your every wish come 
true. 



se^T^^Ti 



Love, 

Mom and Dad 





Parent Ads 527 




Congratulations Eduardo! 

From kindergarten graduation to your present 

college graduation, how time has flown! 

You have truly been a joy in our lives and we wish you a 

lifetime of success filled with love and happiness. 

With all our Love, 

Mom, Dad, and Annette 



Eduardo Sardi 



528 Parent: Ads 




Congratulations 
Megalino! 

Continue your adventure 

always! 

With all our love, 

Mom & Dad, Matt, 

Mike, & Mark 



Megan Niziol 



Herbert Harrison 



WITH ALL OF OUR LOVE 




Walk your path one step at a time ~ with courage, faith, 
and determination. Keep your head up, and cast your dreams 
to the stars. Soon your steps will become firm and your 
footing will be solid. A path that you never imagined will 
become the most comfortable direction you could have ever 
hoped to follow. Keep your belief in yourself and walk into 
your new journey. You will find it magnificent, spectacular, 
and beyond your wildest imaginings. 

Love, 'All of Us" 



Robin Puccio 



Somethings Going To Happen. . . 




. . . around you . . . something good always does. Keep 
your zest for life and your enthusiasm to be your 
best and that will never change. We love you and 
we're proud of all you've done! 



Love, 



Mom, Dad, Jack, Donna, and Jim 




Congratulations 
Karrianne on your 
graduation from 
Boston College! 
We are all very 
proud of you! 

Love, 

Mom, Dad 

Deirdre and Max 



Kan 



■ Humeri 



Dear Kirsten, 

With all of your 
unique talent and 
special gifts, we're 
sure you'll find a way 
to make the world a 
better place. 
Congratulations! 
With our love. 
Mom and Dad 




Kmten Ann Kleppe 



Parent Ads 529 



D.J. MORMILE 

YOU ARE SUIPIEMS 




STATEN ISLAND 



The infant of K»ypte<^ 
is now the IVIan of Steel! 

You always make us proud! 

Love, Squeezy, Captain Wapo, Floom and 
Bango 



KATIE ELIZABETH HART 

Congratulations, Katie! It 
seems like yesterday that you 
were boarding that station 
wagon to Ann Crane's. Now 
you're all grown up and ready 
to conquer the world. We 
love you and know you will 
be very successful. Have fun. 
Love, Dad, Mom, Ali, 
Danny, and all your family 




Live, Love, Laugh and Learn. . . that is all we ever asked of you. But you have 
given us much more. Thank You. . .for all the wonderful memories that we have 
shared together over the past 21 years. You have made us proud of you every day 
of your life. Love You Lots 

xox Mom & Dad xox 




Liuii Masso 



H^an Cremins 




May the road rise up to meet you. May tfie zmndSe 
afways atyourSacI^ May QodfwUyou in the 

hoCfcw of^is 9{and. 

Congratulxitions to ^ and aff your 'BC "Buds. 

Love, 

Mom, (Dad, T^erence & Megan 



530 Parent Ads 



Melissa L. Millora 



1995 High School 
Yearbook Excerpt 



Dear Lisa, Sisa, Missy, Lisa M., 
Melissa, Melody or Smiley, 

We wanted to be sure you know 

we're filled with pride and joy 

But now it doesn't even show 

you "used to be a boy"! 

You thought you'd never graduate 

but you did, how fine it feels 

Now tell us aren't you glad you ate 

those three course breakfast meals? 





Please choose career paths freely 
whether lawyer, doctor, nursin' 
You may even be a fireman 
(or is that "firep^r^on"?) 

No matter what you may do 
regardless what you say 
Our one true hope is that you 
always HAVE A HAPPY DAY "! 



"Ode to Bunsie" 

Four more years and be it known 

Our joy has jumped, our pride has grown. 

You're cuter, smarter and more worldly 

Just how much cooler could a girl be? 

You thought you'd never graduate 

But all those nights you stayed up late 

Have seen you through- Well done we say 

With hard work and patience. 

You've earned your B.A. 



1999 College Yearbook 



Our Bunsie has bungeed, our Sisa has surfed 

You've experienced college 

for all that it's worth. 

With friends that you've made and 

places you've seen 

Your life is made richer. . . 

(ya know what we mean?) 

Wherever you go, whatever you do 

A family that loves you is right behind you. 

A lawyer, a singer or Miss U.S.A. 

Enjoy every moment and "HAVE A HAPPY DAY' 



Parent Ads 531 



Mary-Catherine Louise Schmidt 




Ad'issy, 

We are all so proud of you and all that you have accomplished. Your life shines as 
an example to other Christian women. You will be successftil whatever direction you 
choose and. . . don't ever forget. . .we are always there for you. 

Love, 
Mom, Johnny, and all the family 




532 Parent yVds 



Brian R. Fauvel 




We can't believe this time is here. We could not be 

prouder of you and your accomplishments thus far. 

Whatever direction you choose in life, 

we know you'll do it well. 

We love you, 
Mom and Your Godparents 



KRISTEN SBROGNA 

Congratulations, Sweetheart! 




We love you and are very proud of you! 

Love, Mom, Chip, Derek and Matt 



Alison Birch 

YOU ARE OUR SUNSHINE 



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YX)e cvie vetif pioud o-^ ait uout accompUskments; keep 
sttiVLH^ to achieve ait o-^ ^oui dteams. yHtioaxfS lemenibet to -^ind 
the ti^kt balance between wotk and ptaxf. (Sontlnue to enjoij tke 
beautii in ti-^e and tke goodness in otkets. TOe Love i^ou. 
/Horn, 'T^ad, and "Z^avid 




Parent Ads 533 




Cheers, Em! 

Mat 
Mom 
Dad 



JULIEA.KEANE 



in I leaven 



Mani) people in fit 
and on taplh 
are ppoud oT ijou. 
Lyonqpalulalions, Julie! 

Love, 
IVIom, IVIiTzi, lina, l\im 



Emily Creighton 




From 
B.C. 
to 
Down 
Under 



// 



// 




Congratulations, Marc 




Love, 
Mom 

& 
Dad 



Marc Cicet 



Matthew Smith 

Way to Go! 

From nursery school to BC it's been great fun for us. Keep being j 
happy. Remember how much you've aheady done, and don't ever 
stop chasing after your dreams. And should you roam, don't forget 
to call home! 

We love you. Mom, Dad & Stephen 







M 

n 



You ARE OUR Pride and Joy 






Tou have grown to be a wonderful young lady. We are so very proud of 
you. Your kindness and thoughtfulness have touched us all. 

We know you will succeed in your endeavors. 
We love you so very much and will always be there for you. 

Love, Mom and Dad 



Parent Ads 535 



Samantha Steel 

Continue to let your light shine! 
Love, Mom and Dad 



■HR. 



•v 







PJ. BRENNAN 

CONGRATS 




P.J. 

Where has the time gone, from your first day at The Village 
Pre-School to your graduation day at Boston College, from a 
little boy to a fine young man. We are all very proud of you and 
all that you have accomplished. We wish you every good thing 
that life has to offer and may the joy of life be yours to grasp 
today and always. Remember that we will always be here for 
you. God bless you. 

V'/e Love You, 

Mom, Dad, Katie, and Megan 



Heather Wade 




Our pride in you is exceeded only 
by the size of your accomplishment. 
With love. 
Mom, Nan and Pop 



536 Parent Ads 






MICHAEL SHEEHAN 

Michael, 

It has been wonderful watching you grow from a 
little boy into the beautiful, thoughtful and caring man 
you are today. Each stage of your life has brought us 
joy and beautiful memories. Your graduation is the 
perfect time to celebrate the pride and happiness 
that comes from having a son like you. 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 

"What lies behind us and what lies before us are 
small matters compared to what lies within us." 
Ralph Waldo Emerson 



"Remember you are unique 
You are precious 
You are loved." 
Isaiah 43 





Parent Ads 537 




CONGRATULATIONS CAROLYN! 

We are very proud of you for all your accomplishments. 

Your caring ways, gentleness and dedication have lifted the spirits of family and 
friends. 

Your positive attitude will help you overcome all the challenges of life and enjoy all the 
moments of living. 

We love you and will always be there for you. 

Mom, Dad, Jean and Michael 

--The Scarola Family-- ^ / c / 

/ Carolyn bcarola 



538 Parent Ads 



Jennifer Badaan 



What dreams lie in the heart of this little dancer? 

Her first recital. . .every step, every movement pure magic. 

Your love of dance never ends but grows in new 
directions. The dedication and endless energy you put 
into all that you do has made us very proud of the woman 
you have become and the success we know you'll achieve. 

Love, 

Dad, Mom, Jaime, Jeff and Amira 




Parent Ads 539 



Heather Raven lllingworth 




You're simply the best 
and we love you. 

Mom, Dad and Sarah 



Michele Eickman 




Congratulations ! We are 
very proud of all your ac- 
complishments. Best of 
luck. 

Love Mom, Dad, Theresa, 
Christina & Sandy. 



Rebekah McDonald Maginnis 

"BRAVO"!! 

It has been 16 years since 

we took this picture of you as 

you waited for the bus - on 

your first day of school. We 

are so very proud of all your 

successes and love you 

more each day. 

XOXOXOX Dad, Mom, 

Abigael and the "Mutt" 




John "JJ-" Johnston 

"Those who bring sunshine to the lives of 
others cannot keep it from themselves." 
James M. Barrie 



You are the sunshine in our lives and are such a joy. You have 
accomplished a great deal and this is just the beginning. We 
are all so very proud of you. Remember the Folgers. . . 
Love Mom, Pop, Jessie, and Missy 




540 Parent Ads 




Congratulations- 
From the ones who love you best, 
Mom, Dad, Jacob, David, Sonja, 
Maggie, Spot, Chester, Arabella, 
Limon, and Clarence too. 




Anthony Pollack 



Parent Ads 541 



Patrick Byrne 







Dearest Patrick, 

We love you so much. We are so very 
proud of you and your accomplishments. 
You are a good person and a v^onderful 
son, brother and grandson. 

With your whole life opening in front of 
you v^e can only wish that it be filled v^th 
love and fulfilled dreams. With God at your 
side you can do anything, be anything, 
dream everything. 

We will always be here for you. Our love 
and our pride are bursting v^th joy. 
All our love. 

Mom, Dad, Anne Marie, Peggy Nana and 

Scruffy 



542 Parent Ads 




We do not remember days; 
we remember moments. 

For all the moments you 
have given to us and to 
those around you. ..we 
thank you! 

With love. 
Mom, Dad, and Kevin 

Patrick McMahon 



Ayesha Narjis Hackman 

Like the morning sun you 
rose into our lives and 
now you rise again, a star, 
iscending to wherever you 
allow life to take you. 

We love you. Mom, 
Nfonnis, Jimmy, 
\unts Gloria and Carole, 
md Grandpa 





We're proud of the young woman you've 
Become. 
Congratulations to you and the class of '33. 
All our love, 
(Dad, Mom, and Amanda 

Melissa Cod) 



G^ ham watched pou grow into a Imng^oung' woman 

with pour own identity and indopmdmt voice. 

Ai world of opportunity awaits pou. 

0^0 out and make pour mark. 





-"o 



C^Mbm, ^ad&cAmp 



Karen Ann Solcz 



Parent Ads 543 



Matthew Joe 



CONGRATULATIONS, MATT!!! 




"The future 
belongs to 
those who 

believe in 

the beauty 

of their 

dreams." 

Eleanor Roosevelt 

Love, 
Dad, Mom, Zak and J.J. 




CARA MICHELLE VENEZIANO 



BRAVO, BELLE! 




Time flies. 
How proud you 
have made us 
through the years 
and especially nov^! 



May your life be filled with 
happiness and adventure. 
May your successes always 
bring you satisfaction. 

We love you! 

Dad and Mom 

Chris, Joe and Ashley, 

Julie and Gram 




TIMOTHY LL\M EPSTEIN 

FROM PANTHER, TO RAMBLER, TO EAGLE 



The road has been long 
and windy, to Chestnut 
Hill via Evanston and 
Wiimette, with side trip5 
to Belize and Galway 
City. The going was 
sometimes tough. But 
you did it, and we 
couldn't be prouder of 
you. 

Comhcdirdeas, 

Love, Mom, Aunt Imie, 
and the rest of the 
Frainclin Clan. 




544 Parent Ads 



ANDREW TILLI 




^ ^^^ '"'^'^^Hr 





"Do not follow where the path may lead. 

Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail." 

Anonymous 

May your trails be filled with happiness, adventure and great expectations. 

Just remember to turn back, fi:om time to time, on the trail 

where it all began, at home where you are dearly loved. 

Love, Mom and Rich 




Parent Ads 545 




See the sixth Ring shining 
Brightly in May 
She s proud, she stands tall, 
It s her graduation day 

A wish IS made that future 
Dreams will come true 
By Mom, a Hawk, both Hoyas, 
And fellow Eagles two 



Now all share the seal Dad felt made us legit. 
Because when asked he said, 
''You \e got three choices kid, 
Jesuit, Jesuit, Jesuit " 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



GEORGETOWN 



SAINT JOSEPH'S 
SAINT PETER'S 





Congratulations Caitlin, on your 

graduation and completing the 

24th.year of our Jesuit education 

Love, 
Mom, Monica, Aloysius, Chris, Sheila, and Brendan 



Caitlin h f^ 



546 Pareru Ads 



Joshua Lewin 



You did it your way. 




...and you did it so well. May you 

continue to have success in and 

satisfaction from your endeavors and 

enjoy good health and happiness in 

your life. We will always be here for you. 

With much love and pride, 
Mom, Dad, and David 



CONGRATULATIONS. TQM 

WE ARE SO PROUD OF YOU, 

LOVE ALWAYS, 

MOM, DAD, 

JEN ANDCAITLIN 



Thomas Santora 



Bill Atwood 



Now that it's time to go out 
into the big World, 
REMEMBER 1 thru 1000! 
We're very proud of you 
and wish you all the best in 
the future. 

Love Always, 

Mom, Dad, and Amy 




MATTHEW CASAMASSIMA 

Last but not least! 





You light up all our lives everyday and we are very proud of you! 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 

Laurie '89 and Mike '89 

Carolyn '90 and Mat '90 

Manny '94 '96 

Christy and Doug 



Parent Ads 547 




SEEMAJOSHI 



(Son^^atutations 



you7^UJ)t!!! 





■/\s the ■^towLH^ tivet -^ottoivs its path to the ocean 

so wlU uou have manv paths in tl^e. 

■/\t times it wilt be t ou^kei, otkei times smoother . 

l^evet "^ot^et that v^ou have so muck to o-^-^e^ the wortd- 

T^e patient, as pe^ptexitij is the be^innin^ o-^ knowledge. 

y^ou have ^^ot\>n into a wondet ^ut uoun^ tadu 

and we ate veiu ptoud o-^ wko uou have become. 

T^emembei to attvaifS walk ^it mtif and with bold steps 

towatds uout ^oats and uou skatt be success-^ut. 

Ale mattei wkat patk uou ckoose in ti-^e we witt atwaus 

be tkete -^oi x^ou. TOe Love x^ou. 

/Horn, "T^ad, ^an^ita., ^utie, y/^nita andyAiun 



548 Parent Ads 



KaUM. "lUo^im 




Behold, children are a 

gift of the Lord; 
The fruit of the womb 

is a reward. 

Psalm 127:3 




"For I know the plans I 
have for you," declares 
the Lord, "plans to 
prosper you and not 
harm you, plans to give 
you hope and a future." 
Jeremiah 29:11 




Trust in the Lord with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own 

understanding. 

In all thy ways acknowledge Him, and He shall direct thy paths. 

Proverbs 3:5-6 

WE LOVE YOU SO MUCH! 
Dad, Mum, and Jared 



Parent Ads 549 



Otivui Qanc ^opvtie 



^ou are a shining example of what a daughter can be -- loving and compassionate, beautiful and good, 
honest and principled, determined and independent, sensitive and intelligent. You are a shining example 
of what every parent wishes their daughter was and we are so very proud of you. 

Love, Dad, Mom, Tiffany, Ben and Nicole 



f,P^^^V'^ 




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Rebecca, 



You continue to astound us 
with your capabilities and 
accomplishments. The animal 
kingdom anticipates and awaits 
your car'inq and healing. 
Love from all, 

Molly, Kenny, Oliver, JB, 
Vicki, Lily, Lori, Mom, Dad, 
Carolyn and the other 
creatures who have 
touched your life 




Rebecca Schrade, 



James ~ Congratulations! You make us very proud. 
Love, Mom and Dad 




James Neely 



JEFF, You've always given us so much 
to cheer about! 




^> 



Congratulations and much love, 
Your "SUPERFANS", 

Mom, Dad, and the whole family 

Jejfrey 



550 Patent Ads 




Carrie 
Jriedman 

To Se successjuCj 
the best thing to do 
isjattin [ove 
lOithxjour worf^ 

"With [ove, 

9^om, T^ad, Meggan, Andy, andQraeie 



Parent Ads 551 




Lori Marie Nehls 
From Diapers to Diploma 



Congratulations! We could not be prouder of all your 
accomplishments, thus far. With your determination, 
dedication and hard work, you have not only 
succeeded, but have taken our family to a new level, by 
paving the way to be the first college educated. How 
proud your Grandparents would be. . . 

Good luck in Law School. We know whatever paths 
you choose in life, you will do it well. Please know 
that we will always be here for you if you need us. We 
love you so much! 



r: 




552 Parent Ads 



Megan Burns 

Congratulations ! 



'i^.-;.:^ti 




We're 
proud 
of you 



Love, 

Mom 

and 

Ryan 



KENNETH PESCHIER 

Live your life eacii day as you would climb 
a mountain. An occasional glance toward 
the summit keeps the goal in mind, but 
many beautiful scenes are to be observed 
from each new vantage point. Climb 
slowly, steadily, enjoying each new passing 
moment, and the view from the summit will 
serve as a fitting climax for the journey. 

(Harold V. Melchert) 

We all love you very much and are so proud 
of all that you have already accomplished. 

Keep climbing, Kenneth, and enjoy your climb! 

Love and hugs, Mom, Dad, Jen and Katie 



DEIRDRA GRODE 



n Wherever you shine your light, 
the world is a little brighter. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Eric 




Parent Ads 553 




534 Parent Ads 



Jim O'Brien 




You've done a great JOB, Jim! We are so proud 
of what you have accompHshed, and the person 
you have become. May you always keep your 
values, your strong work ethic, your sense of 
humor and your love of family and friends. 
Love you! 

Mom, Dad, Matt, and Kara 




Erin Girard 

"The supreme happiness 
of life is the conviction 
that we are loved." 

-Victor Hugo- 

Les Miserables 

Love, 
Mom, Dad, and Jeff 



Gary Luck 

Always reach 
for the stars. 

We'll always love and 
support you. 
Mom, Dad, Jason, 
Carolyn, and Buddy 




Here you are 
in kindergarten! 



You've come 
a long ivay... 



Noiv the ivorld 
is at your doorstep. 



Your clan 




BCs 

Most 

Handsome 

Cowboy 




JoiepI) Conlon 



Jason P. Eichiier 



AMY CARIGNAN 

WITH OUR LOVE 

We are so proud of you and the 
woman you are becoming. You 
have met your challenges with 
perseverance and gained 
strength and confidence. 
We love you. 

Mom, Justin, Peter, 
Mary Ellen, and Joseph 




CONGRATULATIONS! 

You have come a long 

way. We are proud of 

you. 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Michael, 

Marc, Laixsa 



Hector Jimenez 



Parent Ads 555 



jZoten and yAbbif, 
C^on^^atutatLons on a ^teat -^out x^eats to^etket! 
^ke -^utute Looks btl^kti 
jZove, ^our patents 




Abby Garrison and Loren Acker 



556 Parent Ads 



THE MANY FACES OF MICHAEL PATRICK BIGGAN 




Be Happy... Be True to Yourself... Follow Your Heart and Dreams... 
We Are PROUD... You Are Loved... Mom, Dad, Suzanne, and Erin 



Parent Ads 557 





te 






wmm?^ 


■■■* "*^~'^W 






Congratulations! It's been a joy watching you grow. We love you! Mom and Robert 
RS. We've based the attached repayment schedule on prime plus 1 % . 



Dani Flemming 



558 Parent Ads 



I Congratulationsy Class of 1999! I 



Business Communication Center, Inc. 

Offset Printing • Typesetting • Business Forms 

Stationery • Desktop Publishing 

Banners & Signs • Mailing • Bindery 

Graphic Design • Invitations • and much more! 




You'll find us in Boston at 

The Prudential Tower Lower Lobby 

(617) 262-3920 




and in Chestnut Hill at 

BC Press • Boston College 

(617) 552-3418/3419 




Parent Ads 559 



The Heights 
congratulates the 

Senior Board 

Members and the 

Graduating Class 

of 1999. 



560 Ads 





Jostens, k. would like 
lo coifcilulate die 

gradnatiiig members of 
IlieOassofm 



Best of kklnflie Mire! 




Ads 561 



1999 Sub Turri 




The staff of Suh Turri Would Lt1ic To Thank: 

Bob McGrath and everyone else at McGrath Studios- For doing a wonderful job your first year working with us 

Arnie Lohmann- This year was filled with new adventures for us and you were so patient and helpfijl 

Kristen EUerbe and everyone else at Jostens- For understanding our need for extra time this year and making our book a 
reality 

Rick Brooks- For designing a cover and dividers that were beautifiil beyond our imagination 

Mer Zovko- For working with us through all of the issues that arrised,for always having an open door and for listening with 
concern. 

Father Joseph O'Keefe, S.J.- For another year as our advisor 

The McGrath Photographers- For your tireless efforts to ensure that as many seniors got their pictures taken as possible. 

The Heights- For your help and support. 

The Deans, Faculty, Staff, Parents, and Alumni- For all of your help, support and contributions throughout the year. 



562 Thank You 



Happiness IS not a station yon arrive at, but a manner of traveling. --Margaret Lee Runbeck- Youcancomplani hcciiiis 




■ Ihivc thorns. 




"Some people come into our lives and quickly go. Some stay for a while 
and leave footprints on our hearts, and we are never ever the same. " 

'-Flavia'' 

"It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is 
invisible to the eye. " -Antoine de Saint-Exupery, The Little Prince - 






"The universe is full of magical things, patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper. " --Eden Phillpotts- 

To the girls of Kostka 3rd, Welch, 616 and A51 (and B55!), thanks for 
putting up with my endless supply of labels, mailing lists, and flyers, 
and for your help during "Friends" and "E.R." I've had a great four 
years with you and will cherish our memories always. Sounds cliche, 
but you know 1 mean it! Thank you for your friendship, the laughs, the 
midnight talks, and even the down times. I've learned mountains with 
you. :) "If we don 't change, we don 't grow. If we don 't grow, lue aren 't really 
living. " -Gail Sheehi/- Katie— I couldn't have done this without you! 1 
had a great time doing interviews and writeups with you. . .we "work" 
well together! "Wlien your dreams turn to dust, vacuum." -Unknown- 
Bill— thankyouior you. You're too good to me. :) Elephant shoe. "Love 
is a friendship that has caught fire." -Unknown- 

Thanks must go out to the members of the Perspectives Pages, for 
sharing so much of yourself and for putting up with my "It's Dani! But 
don't worry, this one will be short!" messages that ended up lasting 3 
minutes. Katie and I had a great time getting to know you. 

Mom, Robert, Dad, and Barbie, thank you for all your love and 
patience, for your support, and for giving me life and letting me share 
it with Ryan, Kelsey, and Dave. To you "kids"— 1 love you! Ryan— had 
a great time with you this summer and in December— you can always 
make me laugh! I'm proud of you. "Time goes by so fast, people go in and 
out of your life. You must never miss the opportunity to tell these people how 
much they mean to yon. " -from the last episode of "Cheers" - 

And to our ever-dwindling yearbook staff, thanks for everything. 
Lauren, you'll never have to hear me say "Where are my pictures?" 
again! 1 wish you luck next year. And a staff! c.^ 








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With all my thanks to the small, but dedicated staff 
of graduating Seniors at Sub Turn. 

It's time to spread your Eagle wings and fly ... 




f 



/auren murphy 



Best of luck to the graduating Class of 1999 — we're right behhid you! 
Best wishes to the 2000 staff of Sub Turri. I beheve in you . 



I could never sufficiently thank everyone who has helped with this project. 11 has been a long and hard year, but we survived. 

Somedays I still can't believe it. 



My deepest love to my family and friends - 
you are my life! 




"A// the roads we have to walk are winding, 
all the lights that line the way are blinding, 
ere are many things that I would like to say to you 
hut I don't know how/' 

-Oasis 



Samantha Steel 
Editor-in-Chief 



Yesm, old friends are the best, unless you find a 

new friend to make an old one out of 

-Sarah fewitt 




I once heard someone ask, Wliat happens when your reahty exceeds your dreams? The four years I have spent at BC, the people that have touched my 
life, and the experiences I have been blessed to have had, have been beyond my wildest imagination. This book is my opportunity to give back to the 
university and to the class of 1999. After I graduate, I will miss the excitement of a fall football Saturday, the knowledge that my friends are all close 
by, and all the little things that make BC college life so unique. Hopefully, the spirit and memories of my senior year at BC will forever be captured 
in this book and in five years when I open it, everything will come rushing back to me. This is the gift I wanted to give my class. I am lucky that I have 
the opportunity to thank everyone who has made my college experience one I will never forget. 

Mom— You are the person I admire most in the world, for your strength, unconditional love, and unending support. I am the person I am today because 
of you. Let your light shine and keep the faith!! 

Dad, Megan, Nanny, Pop-Pop, and Jack— Thank you for everything you have given me. I couldn't have asked for a more wonderful family. I love you 
all and I hope I have become someone you can be proud of. 

Lauren, Dani and Lori — This year has been crazy, stressful, and tough to say the least! Yet, somehow we made it through and made a book which we 
have every right to brag about. You worked harder than any group of people I have ever seen. I look at this and can't believe that the four of 
us managed to get 568 pages done by ourselves. Thank you isn't enough to show how much I appreciate the sacrifices you made and the time 
you put into this. Good luck next year Lauren, I know you can do it because you are the true "Superwoman!" 

To the girls of C-41 and C-43— Thank you for making my senior year filled with so many great moments. I will never forget all the times we shared 
and the all fun we had together! 

Kim— I wish we could have become this close three years ago. Our friendship is something I will always treasure and this year was only the beginning. 
There will always be a spot for you at the end of my bed. 

Lauren and Abby— You are also two people I wish I had known longer. No matter where we all are, we have to get together for double-dates and TV 
watching. You are the best!! 

Jessica— I don't know where to start. It seems as if every moment, every single experience I have had at BC, I have shared with you. But then again when 
in the last eight years, haven't we been together? I wish I had a word to describe you other than "best friend" because you are so much more. 
You are my other-half Remember: Rice- Nights at Who's- Our "Mint" Adventure- McDonald's- The give-the go- the give back- Cancun- 
Welcome to the Jungle- singing till dawn- flip cup queens- tailgates- stalkers- Green beer , stickers, Ned and ?- changing hair colors- the neon 
signs- traveling around the world in our sunglasses- late night phone calls-our overuse of condiments- our spontaneous trip to 'Nova- The Walsh 
Bathroom- Look at me Green- Boones- Springfield- Coors Light Costumes- Mission Impossible-erasing voice-mail- Charles in Charge- The 
nick-nack shelf- Naked Guy- High-Five words- Tom Cruise Marathons- Marathon Monday- Kisses Hello- Chi-Chi's- Grilled Cheeses- North 
Dakota- tears-guys- secrets shared- road trips(Georgetown and Philly!)- and Summer Fun! Thank you for being there through it all, no matter 
V, !);u! Where ever the future leads us, I'll always be here for you. 

Brian— ! 'm so glad you came into my life. You are my best friend and I love you! Meeting you has been one of the best things to happen to me. Your 
support and encouragement has gotten me through even the most difficult times. We'll always have our BC memories but the best is yet to come. 



iianrha 



COLOPHON 



The 1999 edition of Sub Turri, the 
Yearbook of Boston College, was 
printed by the School Products 
Division of Jostens, Inc. in 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 
The 87th Volume, consisting of 
536 pages, had a press run of 2,200 
copies and was printed at the 
Winston-Salem plant. 
COVER: The cover, endsheets, and 
dividers were designed by Rick 
Brooks of the Creative Arts 
Division of Jostens, State College, 
PA. All theme and cover ideas were 
the product of the Editorial Board, 
Rick's talent, and inspired by the 
Bapst Tower . The cover is Maroon 
#541. The Tipon Photos are 
printed in PMS Metallic #8042. 
All text is embossed and in Gold 
Brush Foil 461. 

PAPER: Pages were printed using 
100% black ink with pages 1-16 
on lOOlb. gloss paper and pages 
1 7-500 were printed on gloss stock 
80lb. paper. The endsheets are Base 
Natural 298 paper. The Opening, 
pages 1-15 were printed using 
Matte Black ink with a matte 
varnish and a glossy varnish on the 
photos. Pantone inks and dyes were 
used for spot color throughout the 
book at the discretion of the section 
editors. 

DESIGN: All theme related copy 
and designs including the Opening 
and the Dividers were created by 
the Executive Board. All sections 
were designed and created by their 
respective section editor. All pages 
were created on the Power Mac 
7600, Quadra 660AV, and two 
Power Mac 6500/300 using Aldus 
Pagemaker 6.5 and Jostens' 
Yeartech Templates. The pages 
were printed by our Hewlett 







Packard 4MV Laser Jet Printer. 

PHOTOGRAPHY: Senior portraits were taken by McGrath Studios, 
Inc, 531 Pleasant Street, Brockton, MA 02401. Phone: 1-800-588- 
7681. McGrath Studios was contracted by Boston College to be the 
Official Yearbook Photographer for the 1 999 Sub Turri. Current Events 
photos were purchased through Associated Press Yearbook Photos, New 
York City. All other photos were taken by the Sub Turri staff under the 
direction of the photography editors. Any other photos were graciously 
submitted by students or a variety of University departments. All color 
photos were submitted on Fuji transparency fdm and speedily developed 
by McGrath Studios and Boston Photo Imaging. Black and white photos 
were developed by McGrath Studios. The photos were taken using a 
variety of cameras and lenses manufactured by Nikon, Canon, Quantum, 
and Mamiya. 



TYPOGRAPHY: All Body Copy 
is 12pt. AGaramond, Captions are 
lOpt. AGaramond, Photo Credits 
are 6pt. AGaramond, and Folios 
are lOpt. AGaramond. The type 
used for the cover and endsheets is 
Isadora Regular (Image Club). The 
remaining fonts and sizes of all 
other types were determined by the 
section editors. 

Copyright, 1999, by Sub Turri, 
the Yearbook of Boston College. 
No portion of Sub Turri may be 
reproduced or transmitted in any 
form, electronic, mechanical, 
digital, or otherwise, without the 
expressed written consent of the 
current Editors-in-chief Sub Turri 
was produced entirely by a staff of 
undergraduate student volunteers 
and receives no funding from the 
University or the Student Activities 
Fee. Sub Turri generates revenue 
from yearbook sales, ads, and 
donations. Please direct all inquiries 
to: Sub Turri, the Yearbook of 
Boston College, McElroy 
Commons, Room 103, Chestnut 
Hill, MA 02467. 
Phone: (617) 552-3493, 



Colophon 567 



For Boston 

For here all are one And ever with the Right 

For Boston, For Boston, And their hearts are true, For Boston, For Boston, Shall thy heirs be found. 

We sing our proud refrain! And the towers on the Heights Thy glory is our own! Til time shall be no more 

For Boston, For Boston, Reach to Heav 'n's own blue. For Boston, For Boston, And thy work is crown'd. 

Tis Wisdom's earthly fane. For Boston, For Boston, Tis here that Truth is know. Tor Boston, For Boston, 

Til the echoes ring again! For Thee and Thine alone 




Hail! Alma Mater! 



Hail! Alma Mater! 

Thy praises we sing. 

Foundly thy memories 
round our heart still cling. 

Guide of our youth, 
thro' thee we shall prevail! 

HaiUAlama Mater! 
Hail! All Hail! 



Hail! Alma Mater! 

To! on the height, 

Proudly thy tow'rs are 

raised for the Right. 

God is thy master, 

His Law thy sole avail! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 

Hail! All Hail! 



f^l